Ringing in the ears in dead silence?


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possom813
January 25, 2008, 06:55 AM
I was just wondering if anyone else had an affliction like this. Almost every morning that I don't have to go to work I'm out hog hunting.

Anyway, I usually sit on a feeder for a little while and where we hunt there is nothing around for several thousand yards. At 6am, there is no noise at all. As I'm sitting on the ground with my thoughts, my ears will start ringing. It starts off small and then seems like it progresses to the point that I wouldn't be able to hear anything at all if it was around.

It lasts until the first bird chirps, or I hear an early morning coyote hollering. And when that happens it's the loudest sound you could ever hear.

Does this happen to everybody, or am I going deaf or something.

I know it's not exactly firearm related, but I think that firearms may be partly responsible for it.

And yes, I always wear more than adequate PPE when shooting. The only time not is when I'm actually hunting, at least until I can afford a set of the fancy electronic ear plugs.

-John

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kfranz
January 25, 2008, 07:09 AM
Always, for as long as I can remember. Not very noticable most times, what with the ambient noise of day to day living. Very noticable when it's quiet. My 9 year old son also has it, but his 7 and 4 year old brothers have not made any mention. Had my hearing checked and number of times, and it is fine...

1911Tuner
January 25, 2008, 07:30 AM
Constantly...and so loud that it often keeps me awake, and even wakes me up sometimes.

One of Many
January 25, 2008, 07:57 AM
Tinnitus - the ringing in your ears when absent any external audio input, is a sign of damage to the nerves in your inner ear. It usually is the result of repeated exposure to very loud noises, or may be a result of one exposure to extremely loud noise. It is common among shooters that have not used adequate hearing protection. You can get it after firing just one round without using hearing protection. Even 22 rim-fire can cause damage to your ears. Hunting without some form of ear protection is just asking to have problems with loss of hearing. You seem to have a mild case now, but if you continue to shoot without ear protection, that ringing may be all that you hear at some future date, and it may be heard 24/7/365 like a church bell next to your head.

mekender
January 25, 2008, 08:16 AM
go see an ear nose and throat specialist as soon as possible... it will only continue to get worse... and who knows, one day, the sounds you cant hear might just be the ones you would do anything to be able to hear, like your grandchild's newborn cries...

LKB3rd
January 25, 2008, 08:18 AM
I have slight tinnitis mostly from loud music and concerts when i was a teenager. It's a sign of hearing damage.

1911Tuner
January 25, 2008, 09:09 AM
The sounds that are hardest for me to hear are telephones ringing and most female voices...which isn't entirely a bad thing.
:)

foghornl
January 25, 2008, 09:12 AM
What???

Speak up, sonny...Can't hear you with this 747 constantly buzzing my right ear....

From what you describe, you defintiely have some 'tinitis' (sp??)....a bit (right now) of damage to the nerves in your ears.

WEAR YOUR PLUGS/MUFFS EVERY SINGLE TIME YOU SHOOT!

kfranz
January 25, 2008, 10:27 AM
I'm not going to argue that it isn't nerve damage, but my son has never been exposed to what would generally be considered loud noises. Near as I can tell(and the doctors too), mine hasn't gotten any worse with age.

goon
January 25, 2008, 11:06 AM
It's tinnitus and it will never go away. Mine is permanent and sounds more like kind of a high pitched hissing noise, like air rushing through a very small leak. Wear hearing protection and hope it doesn't get any worse.

Tommygunn
January 25, 2008, 11:09 AM
I have a mild case that comes and goes.
Definantly, hearing protection while shooting any gun is a MUST.

Buzztail
January 25, 2008, 11:14 AM
The sounds that are hardest for me to hear are telephones ringing and most female voices...which isn't entirely a bad thing.

I have Tinnitus. You Sir have a blessing. Where do I sign up?

I wear ear plugs even when riding my motorcycle to avoid my hearing getting any worse. I abused my body greatly when I was younger, and am now paying for it. (now 37:banghead:)

TexasRifleman
January 25, 2008, 11:20 AM
I have it in my right ear, after years of flying a rather loud airplane and lifting the headset on the right to shoot the breeze with the copilot on my right.

Very bad idea looking back...... 19 and stupid I guess.

vzenmn
January 25, 2008, 11:36 AM
I have had a bit of ringing in my ears since a my dad was playing with the new mossberg 500 he gave me that unknowingly had a deffective trigger group causing it to occasionally fire when you close the action even with the safety on. #4 buck (What is the lesson to be learned here class?) + deffective gun+ Small room= instant hearing damage. Took 2 days to be able to hear a a normal face to face conversation. Its only noticable when it is quite like possom813 describes. Its a real pain when I'm trying to figure out where a faint noise is coming from like a leak in a tire or a mouse nosing around in the laundry room.

Snap caps and hearing protection are a must have!

Cougfan2
January 25, 2008, 11:42 AM
possom813 Get thee to a Dr. My best friend suffers from tinnitus and it is painful to hear him talk about it. As far as I know there is no cure, but there are things the Dr. can do for you.

Gingerbreadman
January 25, 2008, 11:44 AM
For me its like the high pitched noise that comes from certain electronics, like when a TV is turned on...and it never goes away. For me the culprit is mostly ear infections during early childhood. They were poo...

From all the recent tinnitus threads lately, I think THR should have a "Tinnitus Support" forum.

joab
January 25, 2008, 11:45 AM
The ringing is getting any louder you are just keying in on it the morning sounds simply cover it up

I have it about as bad as Tuner does

Diet can effect or help to lessen it, smoking and caffeine causes it to be more pronounced

There is only two fixes I have been able to find
An operation to deaden the nerves in the ear but the trade off is total deafness

And always having something going in the background
That's the one I follow
I haven't been in a quiet environment in over 20 years, even sleeping I have to have a television or radio on

harmonic
January 25, 2008, 11:59 AM
To the OP, if it's a gradual thing when you're in your stand, then you haven't damaged your hearing as bad as some of the rest of us. I only hope you're using hearing protection while hunting. In my day it a) was not available and b) when it finally did become available it was considered "sissy."

Now I have a very pronounced ringing. Here's some info you might like to read.

Facts on noise levels:

Decibels measure sound pressure and are logarithmic. That means that only a 3db increase almost doubles sound pressure, a 6db increase quadruples sound pressure, etc.

Gradual hearing loss may occur after prolonged exposure to 90 decibels or above.

Exposure to 100 decibels for more than 15 minutes can cause hearing loss.

Exposure to 110 decibels for more than a minute can cause permanent hearing loss.

At 140 dBA noise causes immediate injury to almost any unprotected ear.

There is also the more extreme ‘acoustic trauma’, which is an immediate loss of hearing after a sudden, exceptionally loud noise such as an explosion.

From: http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu...aring-loss.cfm

“When someone goes to a concert, cuts grass or runs a power saw, they can suffer from NIHL,” said Dr. George Hashisaki, assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Virginia Health System. “Afterwards, if their hearing is muffled or their ears are ringing, they have suffered NIHL. Even if their hearing comes back to what they perceive as normal, a small part of that hearing loss is permanent."

"People who are most in jeopardy of losing their hearing are those who use firearms regularly without ear protection or who are in the military and unable to wear hearing protection, such as those on the frontlines, Hashisaki said. The noise level of gunshots can reach 170 dB and is capable of immediate damage. Hashisaki recommends wearing both earplugs and earmuffs to protect hearing while target shooting."

Comparative noise levels and corresponding damage

12 gauge shotgun 165 dB Instant damage
Jet engine taking off 140 dB Instant damage
Thunder/Ambulance siren 119 dB 3 minutes
Hammer drill 113 dB 15 minutes
Chain saw/Earphones/Concert 110 dB 30 minutes
Bull Dozer 105 dB 1 hour
Tractor/Power tools 96 dB 4 hour
Hairdryer/lawnmower 90 dB 8 hours





Here are noise levels of firearms:

.223, 55GR. Commercial load 18" barrel 155.5dB
.243 in 22" barrel 155.9dB
.30-30 in 20" barrel 156.0dB.
7mm Magnum in 20" barrel 157.5dB.
.308 in 24" barrel 156.2dB.
.30-06 in 24" barrel 158.5dB. In 18" barrel 163.2dB.
.375 18" barrel with muzzle brake 170 dB.
.410 Bore 28" barrel 150dB. 26" barrel 150.25dB. 18" barrel 156.30dB.
20 Gauge 28" barrel 152.50dB. 22" barrel 154.75dB.
12 Gauge 28" barrel 151.50dB. 26" barrel 156.10dB. 18" barrel 161.50dB.
.25 ACP 155.0 dB.
.32 LONG 152.4 dB.
.32 ACP 153.5 dB.
.380 157.7 dB.
9mm 159.8 dB.
.38 S&W 153.5 dB.
.38 Spl 156.3 dB.
.357 Magnum 164.3 dB.
.41 Magnum 163.2 dB.
.44 Spl 155.9 dB.
.45 ACP 157.0 dB.
.45 COLT 154.7 dB.

Factoid

Properly fitted earplugs or muffs reduce noise 15 to 30 dB. The better earplugs and muffs are approximately equal in sound reductions, although earplugs are better for low frequency noise and earmuffs for high frequency noise.

Using muffs and plugs together: Take the higher of the two and add 5 dB. 30 plug with 20 muff gives an effective NRR of 35.

If you are shooting by yourself, roughly 100 rounds of 140 dB instantaneous noise in a day should not produce hearing damage. Put your plugs and muffs on and you get to shoot up to a thousand rounds without damage (louder ammo/gun and the allowable drops by a factor of 5). Shoot with other people and you have to add all the rounds shot cumulatively (10 people shoot 100 rounds and everybody's done for the day; toss a handcannon or 30 cal rifle in and you're back down to 200 rounds cumulative). If you shoot on an indoor range then all the rounds fired while you are on the range go into your total. So you can see that it doesn't take very long on a range to have a thousand rounds popped off around you.

If you want to know what the noise level you are exposed to is you can rent noise dosimeters that you can wear. They will record the total noise exposure and present the information to you as dB. You can then subtract the adjusted combined NRR of your hearing protection to determine if you're getting too much exposure.

LINKS

http://www.deafnessresearch.org.uk/N...+loss+1640.twl
http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu...aring-loss.cfm
http://www.audiologyawareness.com/library.asp

JA
January 25, 2008, 12:08 PM
Going to a doctor is pretty much a waste of time and money. You have nerve damage in your ears and there is nothing that can be done to fix it. Once a nerve is damaged or dies it doesn't heal itself or grow back.
Most people really freak out when they first notice it but you will get used to it. Your's doesn't sound very bad as you didn't complain about not being able to hear high pitched noises or trouble conversing in crowded areas.
Horrow story = I don't have to turn up the TV to hear it as I plain can't here the high pitched squeaks of animals on the nature channel. In a crowd,store,or resturant I have to depend on my lip reading skills to hold a conversation.
The only thing you can do is make sure to use hearing protection anytime you are around loud noises so as not to cause anymore damage.

Wes Janson
January 25, 2008, 12:18 PM
I already know I have tinnitus, but I've got a bit of a strange variation of the op's problem... Every once in a while, I'll be doing something in a normal environment, and suddenly one ear or the other will start ringing really loudly, just as if I'd suddenly been exposed to a really loud, damaging noise. But with nothing else around. And only one ear at a time. Anyone else ever have this happen?

Mannix
January 25, 2008, 12:24 PM
I thought I had tinitus, until I noticed it went away when the power was out :).

Ah... the gifts of youth. (:evil:)

You've probably got a pretty mild case if you only noticed it when it was DEAD silent. I wouldn't worry about it, but I would take steps to prevent further damage. I suggest you invest in a pair of electronic ear muffs if you haven't already. They'll let you hear everything "normal" around you, but will block out the sound of the gunshot(as much as muffs can, anyway).

MilsurpShooter
January 25, 2008, 12:27 PM
Tinnitus. Been my bane since I was about 6 or 7 years old. So about 16 years now. Mine is due to ear problems when I was younger. Had little to no drainage in both ears, 80-90% fluid blockage. 6 unsuccessful surgeries until a specialist recommended an adenoidectomy.

Haven't had ear issues since but the small ringing I expierience is my reminder on how close I came to losing my hearing totally. For the range I often go with earplugs and muffs, I've actually added a little padding to them just to be on the safe side, where I need to have my hearing I have a pair of the noise canceling headphones, allow you to hear but blocks out noises above a certain decibel.

TexasBen317
January 25, 2008, 12:40 PM
Yep,, quilty,, got it --"Tinnitus - the ringing in your ears when absent any external audio input, is a sign of damage to the nerves in your inner ear."

first noticed it when I tested my new 30-06 with the barrel opening inside the walls at the shooting raunge back in like 76.. over the years work noises, more shooting and Rock and Roll, just got worst.. I live with it, but it drives my wife crazy,, cause I can't hear her when she mutters. :(

first time I really noticed it was squirrel hunting,, I used to could hear them move through the trees and leaves,, one day figured out I could not when one crawled down the big butt limb I was sitting on while deer hunting,, .. you know what a 30-06 180 gr hollow point will do to a squirrel at like 15 feet? nothing left. :D

Mr. Ouchie
January 25, 2008, 01:05 PM
Wes, the same thing happens to me sometimes.

CRT TVs put out a whine (I think it's the flyback transformer) that seems to aggravate my tinnitus, it's basically at the same frequency as the ringing for me. My wife can't even hear it, but I can always tell if a TV is on in the house. I switched to a LCD TV recently and it's much better.

Geronimo45
January 25, 2008, 01:18 PM
But with nothing else around. And only one ear at a time. Anyone else ever have this happen?
Yes. Matter of fact, left ear's doing that now.

rcmodel
January 25, 2008, 01:32 PM
I got mine in Army Basic, back before ear plugs were NOT issued or authorized.
The range NCO's would kick you azz if you even mentioned it.

Then later, 106mm Recoilless Rifles & 4-Duce mortars would make your ears bleed!

Then later still, AMU Pistol Team and Sniper school instructor didn't help.

On top of that, and a lifetime of shooting everything that shoots, yea, I've got it!

It's very bothersome in crowded restaurants where the din over-powers any attempt at conversation.
And Turkey Hunting, when you can't hear them gobble over yonder!

But you get used to it and don't even notice it.

Except, now that you reminded me and I started thinking about it! :banghead:


http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/1224.gif
rcmodel

QUICK_DRAW_McGRAW
January 25, 2008, 01:45 PM
exactally, im 21years old and have had it for years. ive always listened to rock music extremely loud with headphones on. have always had loud stereo systems in my cars, as well as loud cars, and only until recently i started using ear protection while shooting.

i always know when a TV is on in my house, and i do have some hearing loss for soft spoken people. or is someone isn't looking at me when they talk i never do understand them. ive just grown used to it and ignor it until i read this thread, now i hear it really loud. thanks everyone ha ha ha

RNB65
January 25, 2008, 01:51 PM
Many things can cause tinnitus. Some people are born with it, it occurs naturally. Some develop it temporarily as a side effect of illness, medication, or stress. Some develop it permanently from exposure to loud noise.

Once you've got the permanent variety, it never goes away. You just have to learn to live with it. Sleeping with a fan or other white noise maker running at night can mask it so it doesn't disturb your sleep.

By all means, go see an Audiologist so he can determine if it has an underlying cause that is treatable.
.

Vern Humphrey
January 25, 2008, 01:56 PM
I have it in my right ear. I don't know what caused it, but I first noticed it right after running over an anti-tank mine.:p

Prince Yamato
January 25, 2008, 01:56 PM
Just to make you aware:

There is no such thing as "silence". There is a natural "earth" tone. This was discovered by the composer Alvin Lucier, who is famous for the electronic music work, "I am sitting in a room."

You're just communing with the earth...far out, man... :)

kfranz
January 25, 2008, 02:03 PM
I already know I have tinnitus, but I've got a bit of a strange variation of the op's problem... Every once in a while, I'll be doing something in a normal environment, and suddenly one ear or the other will start ringing really loudly, just as if I'd suddenly been exposed to a really loud, damaging noise. But with nothing else around. And only one ear at a time. Anyone else ever have this happen?


Yep, me too. Happened earlier today in fact, after reading this thread....

LegalAlien
January 25, 2008, 03:31 PM
I already know I have tinnitus, but I've got a bit of a strange variation of the op's problem... Every once in a while, I'll be doing something in a normal environment, and suddenly one ear or the other will start ringing really loudly, just as if I'd suddenly been exposed to a really loud, damaging noise. But with nothing else around. And only one ear at a time. Anyone else ever have this happen?


Tinnitus sufferer since early 20's - result of sniper and shooting team training in the South African military, (FN FAL clone) without ear protection. A constant never ending hi-pitched ziiiiinnnnnggggg . . . and occasionally a louder pop and louder ring in either ear. I suffer from it in both ears, but more severe in the left. Been to dr's and been told there is no cure for it. One ENT told me that they could fit a hearing aid that emits a counter ring, that effectively balances out and 'suppresses' the tinnitus ring. Never followed up on that option though.

1911Tuner
January 25, 2008, 03:38 PM
I first noticed it right after running over an anti-tank mine

Don'tcha just hate when that happens...

rdrancher
January 25, 2008, 03:45 PM
Constantly...and so loud that it often keeps me awake, and even wakes me up sometimes.

Man, I hear that! Sorry. ;)

Both ears for me, but so bad in my left ear that if two input sounds are present, like a person talking and the tv, I have to concentrate to hear. Add a third sound (fish tank filter, dishwasher, etc.) and I can't make out anything clearly. I'm fifty-two by the way.

Mine is from years of construction site work (saws, drills, etc), loud music, etc. I even wear earplugs while watching live sporting events now.

I have a neighbor that just had surgery to eliminate tinnitus. They sliced his ear in the crease where it meets the head, did whatever magic they do to correct it, and then sewed the ear back on. He tells me that he noticed that the ringing was gone on the drive home from the hospital. He did not lose his hearing in that ear.

Edit - I've been doing research on this today and can find no absolute cure, so I'm checking into his surgery to find out the cause of his tinnitus and then talk to his doctor.

rd

Vern Humphrey
January 25, 2008, 04:03 PM
Don'tcha just hate when that happens...
Runined my whole day - not to mention what it did to my insurance premiums.:neener:

Calibre44
January 25, 2008, 04:11 PM
I’ve had Tinnitus for about 5 months in my left ear. Sounds like a badly tuned radio (without the music and commentary of course). Had a hearing test done which showed I’ve good very good hearing despite the hissing and had to have an MRI scan to make sure there wasn’t anything nasty behind my ear drum - it came back negative (thank goodness!). It doesn’t really bother me most days but I’ve noticed that when I’m stressed at work the pitch goes up.

Last week at the range though, the hissing noise turned into a low whistling sound after I’d shot 50 rounds of 44 Mag through my Winchester 1894 Trails End and 36 shots from my BP Pistol. (I wear good quality electronic ear defenders). When I got in my car I thought there was something wrong with the electronics until I realised it was my ear making the noise. The whistling noise stopped in about an hour but the hiss still remains. I’m going to try soft push-in plugs as well as my ear defenders next week and see if it happens again.

I used this combination with my 10.22 at an in-door range yesterday and thankfully, no whistling occurred so hopefully I’ll be okay.

WildcatRegi
January 25, 2008, 04:18 PM
As everyone else has mentioned, this ringing is quite common.

I'm told that taking vitamin B3 helps - you can usually find this in drug stores and it is known as Niacin.

I've taken Niacin but I can't really tell if it has helped but it might be worth a try - don't take too much too fast because your skin will feel like you have a slight sun burn - if you do - try walking it off.

A trick I started to use was to take my Niacin just before doing a treadmill workout.

http://www.vitaminstuff.com/vitamin-b3-niacin.html

possom813
January 25, 2008, 04:51 PM
You're just communing with the earth...far out, man...

Right on, you sound like one of my supervisors, he's an old skool "child of the 60's". He's into the all natural stuff and doesn't eat meat. For some reason he gets stuck on the random drug tests about once a month. He also gripes at me for hunting and fishing.

230RN
January 25, 2008, 04:59 PM
Aspirin will cause tinnitus also. It is an ototoxin, but the effects go away after a while, which could explain its coming and going for some.

Cosmoline
January 25, 2008, 04:59 PM
I don't just wear ear plugs to avoid this, I wear plugs AND high decible ear muffs.

gym
January 25, 2008, 05:01 PM
Wow, I never realized that there were so many with hearing disabilitys. Sorry to find that so many nice people have such a debilitating illness. I can't help but think it has more to do with shooting without proper protection. I know a lot of people and although they all have something that bothers them, this seems too common amongst shooters.

Vern Humphrey
January 25, 2008, 05:06 PM
I don't just wear ear plugs to avoid this, I wear plugs AND high decible ear muffs.

Me, too. Now.

TEDDY
January 25, 2008, 05:32 PM
sportsman guide has electronic ear muffs for $18.I have pair and they work.
:uhoh:----:confused:---:)

carnaby
January 25, 2008, 05:50 PM
Diet can effect or help to lessen it, smoking and caffeine causes it to be more pronounced

Sugar really amps mine up. If I can avoid sugary and starchy foods for a week, I get a significant reduction in my tinnitus. There was a study done in Brazil that supported the hypothesis that sugar is really bad for tinnitus.

There is only two fixes I have been able to find
An operation to deaden the nerves in the ear but the trade off is total deafness

I've also read that it can make no change whatsoever in the tinnitus, or even make it worse, in addition to being totally deaf. Sounds too risky to me.

I used to have the very mild tinnitus from playing in a band and loud concerts. A couple years ago it amped up a whole bunch all on its own. Take good care of your ears, and try cutting out sugar and high glycemic-index foods (bread, beer, potatoes, etc) from your diet for a month. Helps me.

HogFan
January 25, 2008, 06:35 PM
Sounds like you have tinnitus as mentioned. I have developed a mild case over the last year. Going to the doc Wednesday to have put in my military medical records.

Jaenak
January 25, 2008, 06:39 PM
One Of Many explained it perfectly. My dad is a career nurse and I've picked up a few things from all his after work stories and I was going to go into the technical medical explination but One Of Many already did. Listen to him, he's right.

1911NM
January 25, 2008, 07:18 PM
Yep, me too. Too many years of running heavy equipment, blasting, and shooting without hearing protection. Constant ringing in both ears, moderate to severe hearing loss in left, and oh, what the heck, can't hear out of the other ear either. Loss is tonal, so still arguing about hearing aids, but living with the constant ringing and irritability in crowds, or parties due to not being able to pick out a conversation. Man, if I had it to do all over again!

Slugless
January 25, 2008, 07:56 PM
Possom#,

Tinnitus for me also comes and goes. What posture are you sitting in? Are you putting stress on your neck? Are you sitting still? Do you have a stiff neck? Full range of motion of your neck?

Tinnitus for me is associated with a stiff neck. Sometimes I can stretch my neck / pop it & it goes away. When it's consistent I see the chiropractor. After he cracks my neck it goes away w/in minutes.

Your ears are enervated through the neck as well as through the skull. A stiff neck/misaligned vertebrate can cause tinnitus.

Try stretching/adjusting your posture. If you don't have full range of motion in your neck you might want to work on that. If this doesn't work, well, the guys above have covered things pretty well.

thebaldguy
January 25, 2008, 08:20 PM
Wearing proper ear protection can keep it from getting worse. My damage was done by loud concerts from the early 80's to early 90's. I have been using ear plugs since and it certainly kept it from getting worse. I keep ear plugs in all the cars now for anyone who wants them. Keep ear muffs handy when using loud power tools as well.

Crimp
January 25, 2008, 08:31 PM
my ears will start ringing. It starts off small and then seems like it progresses to the point that I wouldn't be able to hear anything at all if it was around.

And it seems to get worse as you age.

I have constant ringing in both ears. Different frequencies. There are other noises too. I can occassionally hear a "chirping" noise, and it ain't no bird! ;) After the high off my first cup of coffee, I hear another noise, sorta like a diesel locomotive idling way off in the distance. Funny stuff, huh? I think it all started with the constant loud noises back in my shipboard Navy days. If there's a loud fan, humidifier, ac unit, TV or other constant noise in the room, I have a hard time deciphering a person's voice. Understanding someone on the telephone is particularly bad. It'd be nice if I could make it all go away.

TAKE CARE OF YOUR EARS!

Harpo
January 25, 2008, 08:32 PM
Me too. Many years as a chain saw tech, musician, and much shooting. I can ignore it most of the time, but I need music or some sort of cover noise so I can go to sleep.

Harpo

Blakenzy
January 25, 2008, 08:42 PM
This is why we have to get sound suppressors off the NFA list. It's a health issue...

Big Boomer
January 25, 2008, 08:53 PM
Welcome to the club! Not really...

It SUCKS to have hearing loss, I have permanent tinnitus as well have had it since about 16 when I did not know what hearing protection was at all.

I'm legally deaf, whatever that means. I have like 95% loss in one ear and 93% in another (don't remember which is which).

I can't afford hearing aids, and they tell me that they most likely won't help that much anyhow.

I can't hear cell phones ring, birds chirp, flutes play (or most instruments of a higher octave), scary one is smoke detectors don't exist in my life, most any alarm, creaking, clicking, squeaking things. It's a pretty quiet life...oh if it weren't for that damn ringing! It's like someone put a firecracker to your ear and the ringing just never stopped. Some days it's so bad it'll drive you mad, others you don't really notice it's there until you think about it (like now).

I hope that yours is able to repair itself but you never know what it's like till it's gone. Music is bland, no crickets or frogs singing their melody at night (my wife has to tell me about it when we sit on the porch), the sound of the wind rustling through the tree's, the sound of raindrops pitter patting on the roof or the light splashing sounds they make on the ground. All these things just a memory to me, I am not sure If I even remember them right.

It's sort of like trying to remember the voice of a long lost loved one, remembering their voice but thinking that it's just not quite right but never being able to hear it again.

The sounds of fingers against the sheets, or the sizzle of the grill while you cook, these are just a few small things that you will miss. I have to say one of the biggest losses is not being able to hear the birds chirp on a beautiful spring day. You walk outside and see movement and life all around but it's just mostly silent almost like being a living ghost knowing something is missing.

Hunting takes on a new meaning when you are trying to stalk prey and your buddy is yelling at you to be quiet and you have absolutely no idea what they are talking about! The cracking of twigs beneath your feet, the rustle of branches against your clothing, only the sound of your own breathing is what is heard in your ears.

Life goes on, yes, but it's so much sweeter with sound! Wear your hearing protection, double up! Do your friends a favor make them wear them as well, even if it's out on a hunt.

Javelin
January 25, 2008, 09:13 PM
Constantly...and so loud that it often keeps me awake, and even wakes me up sometimes.


YES EXACTLY! And another thing I can't figure out... why don't the voices ever tell me to do nice things?

:)

NAK
January 25, 2008, 09:33 PM
It been part of my life for 28 years. :cuss: The right ear has a slightly lower pitch than my left ear.

Certain medications (especially aspirin, red wine, elevated blood pressure all make mine worst.

A few years back I was on really strong steroids or a month or so, that improved it, while I was taking the steroids, but it came back within day of finishing the meds.

In a sickly ironic sort of way, ear plugs and muffs really make me aware of it. I finally bought amplified shooting protectors.

darwin-t
January 25, 2008, 11:52 PM
I have it,too. I got it from working in a factory and a foundry without earplugs most of the time.

It's weird. We have adigital thermometer that beeps when it's done. I can hold that right up to my ear and not hear it.

The ringing is most noticible when it's quiet, otherwise it's drowned out by other noises. If you look into treatments, most of them involve how to learn to ignore it.

MM
January 26, 2008, 12:27 AM
Check your blood pressure. Since I have survived long enough to get "old" my constant ear noise is akin to cicadas humming. A manifestation of high bp...
MM

gp911
January 26, 2008, 01:42 AM
EEEEEEEEEEEeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

Got it, don't like it, live with it...

Worse when I'm exposed to loud noise now, but present regardless... Mine is almost metallic sounding, like rubbing a metal rod against a glass or something... Uncool...


gp911 "EEEEEEEEEeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!"

Grizzly Adams
January 26, 2008, 01:31 PM
Got it. Seems to be getting worse lately. Worked on a flight line around jets for a number of years and have shot all my life. Tried to protect my hearing, but apparently didn't do a very good job.

Zedicus
January 26, 2008, 04:25 PM
Always, for as long as I can remember. Not very noticable most times, what with the ambient noise of day to day living. Very noticable when it's quiet. Had my hearing checked and number of times, and it is fine...

Same here, been Checked for Tinnitus and was found not to have anything remotely wrong with my ears (Above Average Hearing) I am told that this (the ringing) Runs in both sides of My Family though, No clue on the cause.

brett30030
January 26, 2008, 08:15 PM
40 y/o and after years of shooting, operation bobcats, and about half a dozen black flag shows; my ears ring in the absence of other noise. I tell my guys at work that the hearing protection we require is not to protect the company, it is to protect their future. They just look at me like i am crazy. If they could hear the squeal that i hear in silence, they would understand.

Pilgrim
January 26, 2008, 10:04 PM
Four years working on the flight deck of aircraft carriers will do it.

Pilgrim

Big Boomer
January 27, 2008, 01:10 AM
Alright, I really have to quit reading threads in regards to tinnitus as I usually forget about it until I read something like the above post.

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEeeeeeeeEEEEEEEEEEEeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee


and then I notice that it's REALLY friggin LOUD!!! Thanks...

carnaby
January 27, 2008, 03:24 AM
The sounds of fingers against the sheets, or the sizzle of the grill while you cook, these are just a few small things that you will miss. I have to say one of the biggest losses is not being able to hear the birds chirp on a beautiful spring day. You walk outside and see movement and life all around but it's just mostly silent almost like being a living ghost knowing something is missing.

Big Boomer, have you thought about Cochlear implants? I don't even know if they would work in your situation, but I think they might, and they can give you much of your lost hearing back AFAK.

GeezerwithGuns
January 27, 2008, 10:34 AM
Yes, I have it too. Fortunately very little actual hearing loss, but both my ears have been ringing for about 15 yrs. I'm 60 and the effects of almost 50 yrs of shooting, racing unmuffled motorcycles and loud music have taken their toll. It usually doesn't bother me much unless I think about it. Mine doesn't have a relationship to high blood pressure - fortunately my BP is 110 over 65 (low) and my ears still ring like crazy.

I tried Ginko Biloba and it didn't work. Less caffeine and getting more rest seems to help somewhat. I tried chiropractic and there was some immediate benefit, lessening the ringing but it returned after a week or so. I can't afford an adjustment every week so that's out. I recently read that there have been some successes with acupuncture - maybe I'll give that a try.

It's a tough deal and those who don't have to deal with it are lucky and should always take adequate steps to protect their hearing.

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