PSD/Executive Protection Work


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headcrash
January 25, 2008, 08:12 PM
I am somewhat new to the THR.org and wondering if anyone here works in the PSD/Executive protection line of work that may be able to share stories or assist me and others in finding work. I am not military but have formal security and weapons training, hopefully there are others out there who would benefit from any discussions. Thx:)

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AndyC
January 25, 2008, 11:06 PM
If you mean PSD work as in Iraq or Afghanistan, you're not likely to find it without military experience (anything's possible, of course, as there are disreputable firms everywhere).

If you mean here in the US, sure - take all the reputable courses you can afford and expect to work your way up the ladder by (typically) doing static guarding at a residence, night-shift, weekends - all the nasty but very necessary newbie stuff as you pay your dues, improve your skills and gain experience before moving up to formation-work, etc.

Edit: You can also look into the more specialized positions such as driver, threat analyst, etc. For example, you might have no idea that a top protective driver's skills have to include a lot more than just brilliant defensive and offensive driving - try route reconnaissance which involves pre-planning, driving and timing multiple routes to and from a single start- and end-point, noting all possible ambush-points based on the likely threat, location of police-stations, hospitals, etc - just for starters ;)

Hoppy590
January 25, 2008, 11:10 PM
military experience is the way to go. the number of ex police, and honest to goodness combat vets is only rising, if you dont have the time logged. dont expect to get in.

kingjoey
January 25, 2008, 11:30 PM
Been there, done that....it sucks. Its pretty stressful and usually is pretty uneventful. Openings in that field don't come available too often, you'll just have to keep your eyes open and apply for openings as you find them

Redtail
January 25, 2008, 11:46 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Bodyguard-Manual-Protection-Techniques-Professionals/dp/1853676624/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201319023&sr=8-1

I have this book but the previous edition, it's a good read and even tells you the bad sides about it.

AndyC
January 25, 2008, 11:53 PM
"Providing Executive Protection" by Dr. Richard Kobetz is also a worthwhile read - although it's more an overview as opposed to a step-by-step guide.

bogie
January 26, 2008, 02:26 AM
Buy as many back issues of Soldier of Fortune that you can find.

Dress all in black. All the time.

Shave your head.

Make sure everyone in the gun store knows how smart you are.

strambo
January 26, 2008, 12:38 PM
For Iraq/A-stan PSD, you will most likely need prior military experience in the sandbox. Not always though, I got hired with prior military, but that was my 1st time to Iraq. Once you get in somewhere and do a good job, it is easier to network into other gigs in theater.

You need to get EP specific training. The"big 3" courses are commonly considered to be: RL Oatman, Kobetz and ESI.

For domestic EP work....it is tough, lots of networking, get an entry level job, work your way up. Feast or famine going from job to job (few full-time positions). I decided I wasn't dedicated enough to go the domestic EP route, so I can't say from experience how tough it is.

highorder
January 26, 2008, 01:03 PM
I have no experience, but this was a great read;

http://www.amazon.com/Licensed-Kill-Hired-Guns-Terror/dp/1400097827/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201366937&sr=1-1

lonegunman
January 26, 2008, 01:04 PM
Blackwater accepts resumes from several non-military fields and requires you to complete an academy of sorts. If I am not mistaken this cost is deducted from your first few months pay. I have some friends in that line of work, they are all ex-military. One friend works for Blackwater and he did two training and selection weeks before hiring on. He felt is was useful in culling out the riff raff.


You could end up starting pretty low on the totem pole and the pay down there is pretty dismal. A lot of companies are using "third country nationals" (TCN's) for this type of work because they are cheap. Picking who you work for carefully is as important as getting a job, especially if you like coming home alive.

If you enjoyed reading about "PSD/Executive Protection Work" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!