What's The Best Way To Carry A Handgun On A Bike?


PDA






Phriend
January 26, 2008, 04:35 PM
I'm thinking about moving to Florida, where I'll be spending a lot of time riding my bike around. It's hot there, so I'll probably just be wearing a T-shirt and a pair of athletic shorts.

That said, what is the best way that I could carry a handgun under these conditions? (Also, what is the best way that I could carry a backup handgun while riding my bike?)

Which type of carry/carries would you most recommend?

Thanks! :)

If you enjoyed reading about "What's The Best Way To Carry A Handgun On A Bike?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Steve C
January 26, 2008, 04:43 PM
Many bikers just open carry in a belt holster here in AZ. I've also carried in a fanny pack on in the tank bag taking it with me when I leave the bike. A Walther PPK/s fits well in the inside pocket of my jacket for those times when its cool enough you have to wear a jacket.

Open carry is unrestricted here in AZ. Concealed requires a CCW.

Vern Humphrey
January 26, 2008, 05:11 PM
Years and years ago, when I was stationed at Fort Benning, I did a lot of bike riding. People there would sometimes coast up behind you, yell or take a swipe at you, and so on.

So I got what the law then called a "Pistol Toter's Permit" and rode with my .45 on a GI web belt, in a GI holster -- and never had another probem.:evil:

eagle45
January 26, 2008, 05:58 PM
My wife and I ride together, more in the warmer weather though. I usually wear just a pair of sweat pant shorts when I ride, with a light shirt of some kind. I use a smart carry, but I turn it so the holster portion is on my right side (since I'm right handed) and use a lightweight revolver. My shorts have pockets, so I carry a speed strip in each one. It is comfortable, and since the revolver is on the side it doesn't 'get in the way' ;) as I pedal. Works great for me.

MillCreek
January 26, 2008, 06:50 PM
I am a serious road bicycle rider and therefore wear the typical jerseys and spandex shorts. I carry in a handlebar bag while on the bike and a small pouch or fanny pack off the bicycle. My typical carry is a Taurus 651 in titanium that weighs 19 oz. loaded. There is no way I could carry this in a jersey pocket, and road shorts typically do not have pockets.

putteral
January 26, 2008, 06:55 PM
I live in Florida and ride my bike all the time. Always carry my KP95. Just wear a belt over my shorts use my Inside the waist holster and let the shirt cover it. Good to go. The hotter the better.

S&Wfan
January 26, 2008, 09:12 PM
In rural Georgia I generally carried a Kel-Tec p32 OR a lightweight officer's sized 1911 in the little bike bag under the seat . . . and a can of pepper spray hooked the handle bars.

I've only had to use the pepper spray a couple of times . . . on hostile rural dogs.

HOWEVER . . . a local cyclist couple finally got more aggressive against the dogs, after the man was knocked off his bike by a German Shepherd that cut in front of him. My friend landed on his HEAD . . . and only his split helmet saved him from serious injury.

After my friend went to the dog's owner and asked him to please keep his dogs safely on his property as required by law . . . the dog's owner (a deputy sheriff) just laughed at him.

So . . . my friend's wife got a NAA Black Widow revolver in .22mag and loaded it with rat shot . . . and she started shooting every dog that went after them aggressively. Dogs give 'em a huge berth now . . . every danged dog in several counties where they ride!!!

A NEW WEAPON IN THE ROCKIES . . .

My brother-in-law out in the Colorado mountains has found a VERY effective tool against folks in cars who hassle them (they'll race in front of a cyclist on a steep incline and then slow down to literally a crawl right in front of the cyclist.

The "secret weapon?" A cellphone having a camera to "shoot" the car's license plate. When that camera is aimed at the back of the car . . . the driver hauls arse immediately . . . never to be seen again. By then though, the car's license plate is recorded.

Shawnee
January 26, 2008, 10:03 PM
Speaking just for myself, I think it's a very bad idea for cyclists to "carry".

The animosity between cyclists and drivers is too "charged" as it is and, fact is, good cyclists are like good hunters - they get a bad rap for all the "slob" cyclists out there - and there are tons of 'em. For every story you can tell about being ruded by a driver there are ten drivers who can tell a story about cocky, snotty rude-as-Hades cyclists... and thas'sa Fac, Jac !

Also, if you want to get in a heap of trouble in a blazing hurry - just shoot someone's dog like one of the above posters speaks of. In a rapidly increasing number of places such an act will bring you a felony conviction for animal cruelty/abuse so fast your head will spin. Remember too that along with a fine and jail - felony convictions bring the loss of the right to own/handle firearms. And if you happen to plug someone's registered hunting dog they have about $5000 in you are going to be absolutely astonished at how bad your life gets and how fast it gets there.

ALWAYS use your best judgement before you use your best gun.

:cool:

Javelin
January 26, 2008, 10:06 PM
P3AT in your pocket.

:)

People there would sometimes coast up behind you, yell or take a swipe at you, and so on.


Sounds like you were riding on Victory Drive Vern.

The Lone Haranguer
January 26, 2008, 10:37 PM
Let the bicycle carry it, perhaps in a handlebar bag or in a soft case suspended from a frame tube.

Phydeaux642
January 26, 2008, 10:40 PM
Like eagle45, I use a Smartcarry when on the bicycle (next time I will try Thunderwear). I prefer to have the gun on my person instead of on the bike in a bag in case I get seperated from my bike in a desperate situation. Just my .02.

_________________

"Phydeaux, bad dog....no biscuit!"

Shawnee
January 26, 2008, 10:43 PM
His S&WFan...

Was in Rocky Mountain Nat'l Park this passed Sept. and witnessed exactly what you describe - someone in a car getting in front of a biker on a steep grade. Obviously a very crummy thing to do but, I gotta tell Ya - it reminded me immediately of the many times I've seen cyclists around Auburndale and Winter Haven, Florida amuse themselves by blocking the lanes until they had a long line of cars backed up on Old Dixie Highway.
So I had to wonder if the driver I saw harrassing that mountain biker was "just returning a "favor" they had been done by some slob cyclist somewhere.

Personally, I think cyclists (like hunters/shooters) should spend a lot of time policing their own ranks, and doing it in no uncertain terms, too.

As always, local opinions may vary. :cool:

Tokugawa
January 27, 2008, 12:31 AM
Hey MILLCREEK, am I gonna haf'ta worry about running you off the road in Utah now too? Big smile icon here please! (this is a joke about our Utah CCW class folks- don't get mad!)

Comanche180
January 27, 2008, 08:42 AM
I ride quite a lot although I've never carried while riding. A couple times I wished I had, but it's better I didn't, the judgement thing. I've had people try to grab me, throw things at me and try to force me off the pavement. A couple red necks in a pick up hit me in the ribs with an object launched from an air cannon. I've been knocked down twice by drivers who weren't paying attention. I stick to the rural roads these days where there is less traffic.

As far as dogs go, the most effective deterrent I have found is a squirt from my water bottle in the eyes of an approaching dog, stops them every time. You guys with those backpack water systems are SOL in this case. I have been bitten by a dog working in a pack which got in front of me, slowed me down and one of them got me. When I see a loose dog, it's usually a good time to throw in a sprint.

LKB3rd
January 27, 2008, 10:44 AM
I used to cycle a lot before i owned firearms, and have been thinking of getting back into it. I will definitely carry if i do. A lot of motorists get crazy about cyclists. Just yesterday, a friend told me he got repeatedly buzzed by some lady, and he says he thinks she would have run him down if there weren't other people around.
I have had motorists buzz me before, and one time this happened when i was riding with two other guys, and the driver stopped and got out of his car slightly up the road. We got off of our bikes, and i guess he thought better of whatever he was thinking of doing and got back in his car and drove off. I would want to be prepared for some wacko getting out of his car with a shotgun or something lol.
I'll probably carry in a fanny pack or maybe a pocket holster in my rear shirt pocket (cycling shirts have pockets on the lower back area).

Pilot
January 27, 2008, 11:12 AM
I carry in a fanny pack when I ride both my road and mountain bikes.

Shawnee
January 27, 2008, 01:01 PM
Hi Commanche...

"I've had people try to grab me, throw things at me and try to force me off the pavement. A couple red necks in a pick up hit me in the ribs with an object launched from an air cannon. I've been knocked down twice by drivers who weren't paying attention. I stick to the rural roads these days where there is less traffic."

Such knuckleheadery is even less funny if you're on horseback. And that pavement looks real hard when your head is 10-11 ft. off the ground.
Even in the state and national forests horsemen have to be alert to people on ATVs and mountain bikes. The ATV types are mostly considerate but the biker types are often a problem simply because they are not "horse-saavy" and do things without a clue about the potential danger of the deed. Even worse, the kick of a horse can send a biker to The Happy Peddling Ground in a heartbeat and then the horseman is in trouble for something he really didn't cause.

I had a mountain biker type come around a sharp curve in the trail right "in my face" and glance off my horse's left shoulder in passing and then wreck nearly under the horse behind me. Luckily I was on a bombproof horse or the biker and I both would probably have gone to the hospital.The horse behind me spooked and dumped its' rider badly enough that she couldn't remount for about 30 minutes. But that wreck wasn't my fault OR the biker's - we both got surprised.
If the bikes (or horses) made some kind of noise on the dirt trails it would be a lot easier to avoid any surprise meetings but I've met exactly zero cyclists who sing while peddling and there isn't a single "beep" in my saddlehorn.

I don't know what the Answer is and, Yea - sometimes, especially along the highways, I would smugly enjoy having my Super Blackhawk visible on my hip but - Discretion being the Better Part of Valor, it's probably best that I don't.

:cool:

slide
January 27, 2008, 01:11 PM
Well, Shawnee, if you can't trust yourself to behave responsibly when armed, then never go armed. That doesn't mean all of us are like that.

I also dispute your claim earlier that the rudeness is 10:1 against bicyclists. Sure, many times cagers (car drivers to you) resent bicycles because either they go slower than cars or they can make progress when the cagers are stuck in traffic. However, the frustration that cagers feel is their own problem. Bicyclers tend to be law abiding and it's the cagers who won't give them the proper right of way or who feel anger for some internal reasons of their own.

The fact is that I on my bike mass maybe 100 kg where even a modest cage is 10x that amount. I CAN'T be rude and live. The rudeness of a bicycler is mostly in the mind of the cager plus the arrogant attitude I get from both cagers and horsemen that they OWN the right of way.

I'll find horsemen rude when they stop to pick up the horses**t they lay over the trails. Say what you will about bicyclers, but the wake of a bicycle is a darn sight nicer than that of a **** horse.

Shawnee
January 27, 2008, 01:17 PM
"...cocky, snotty rude-as-Hades cyclists"


Thanks for illustrating my point, 'Slide", but it really wasn't necessary.


:rolleyes:

MillCreek
January 27, 2008, 02:13 PM
If you ever want to really stir up a tempest, go to www.bikeforums.net (I use the same user name there) and post this same question. It turns into a political discussion right quick, but you would be surprised to know just how many bicyclists do carry. There is some useful information on carrying while biking, for example the debate over on the bike vs. on the person carry from the standpoint of safety in a crash, for example and speed of access.

I myself ride defensively and do not block traffic or harass drivers, although plenty of cyclists do, especially in packs. I have had some unpleasant experiences on rural roads with drivers where there are no witnesses and some people think they can get away with things, especially in packs.

Very interesting comments about mountain bikers and horse riders unexpectedly encountering each other on a trail. I don't run into this very frequently, but I always dismount and move to the side of the trail until the horses pass or if I am overtaking them, I call out and ask the riders what they want me to do. If we are both going uphill, I will dismount and push the bicycle past them and then remount. Is this the recommended approach?

slide
January 27, 2008, 02:43 PM
I have and I"m a member there. I suppose with guys like Shawnee running bicyclists down in his car and on his horse, you can't be too surprised that some are armed.

Here the way to address the horse / bicycle problem is for the bicyclist to dismount and move to the side of the trail unless directed to differently by the horse guy. The problem is that where I am, many trails are in brush so you do get the surprise encounter which is bad for the horse, apparently. My take is if the horse is incapable of being controlled on multi use trails, don't put that stupid animal on those trails.

Horse riders demand all this courtesy from everybody else while leaving disgusting piles of s**t behind them. WE all get along (dog walkers, runners, walkers, nature lookers, bicyclers) but he horse contingent demands special treatment (right of way over everybody) and does the greatest damage to the trails. Even the dog bunch picks up after itself.

Shawnee
January 27, 2008, 02:52 PM
Hi Millcreek...

Yep... am familiar with some of the "politics" (good, bad, or ugly) as practiced by cyclist groups - and also some of the attitudes of horsemen.

Personally, I very much prefer to cede the "right-away" to the cyclists on the trails. It's easier for a horseman to move off the trail than it is for a biker. Also, it is generally safer for me to re-position a horse so they can watch the biker move passed rather than have the biker stop and then I have to ask the horse to move passed (at close distance) a stationary biker. That's because if the horse can see the biker moving by at a safe distance it is more at ease than if it sees the biker stop close by (the horse may wonder if the biker stopped to eat him:rolleyes:).
Since there are often several horses on a trail ride the "re-positoning" of all the horses takes a bit of time and the biker will probably have to slow down to allow for that... and that isn't so much fun for a biker on a woods trail. The alternative is for the biker to stop at a safe distance and wait for the horses to clear the way.
I've ridden with a lot of people and can honestly say 99% of them really want to keep the bikers (and hikers) safe - not to mention themselves and their horses. And the last thing a trailriding horseman wants is a "chain reaction" where one horse spooks and the others decide to follow suit. Few things are as unFun as hitting the ground in the middle of a 7-horse Panic Party.
Sad fact is - many people will go trailriding on horses that haven't been trained to stay calm. Most experienced horsemen I know are really, really careful about who they ride with for that reason but too often it doesn't turn out that way.
Anyway - I am best able to keep myself and my horse and any bikers/hikers safe if I just have enough time to clear the way and I am more than glad to do so. Out on the road I can usually hear cars approaching but not so the bikers. Will be happy to move over for them there too but I gotta know they are coming before they are on top of me.

:cool:

Shawnee
January 27, 2008, 03:13 PM
"WE all get along (dog walkers, runners, walkers, nature lookers, bicyclers)"

:rolleyes:

Not so at all, "Slide". I've met a lot of hikers who complain about the recklessness and the "It's All About Us" attitude of cyclists. And I met an elderly couple in Florida who were both knocked down by some bikers who then cussed the old people out and rode off without even trying to determine if either of the couple was hurt.

:cool:

MillCreek
January 27, 2008, 03:47 PM
Several months ago in this area, a mountain bike rider was cycling along over in the Kitsap peninsula when he rounded a corner and almost plowed right into a black bear on the same trail. It is hard to say who was more startled, but he was mauled pretty good by the bear and had a prolonged hospital stay. The bear was trapped and successfully relocated.

This would rank very high in the 'some days it sucks to be you' category.

USBP 1969
January 27, 2008, 04:05 PM
After years of searching for a good concealed carry method I came across what's called a "Safepacker." It was originally designed as a holster for mountain rescus folks, but has evolved into an outstanding CCW holster.

It has a large belt loop on the back, but I carry it suspended by a 1.5" shoulder strap from the off shoulder. (I cut the rubber sliding thing off.) It fits any handgun from a tiny semi-auto to an "N" frame S&W depending upon the size one orders. Folks can not believe that mine is, in reality, a holster.

It's available at: http://store.thewilderness.com/index.php?cPath=51

Respectfully,
Kent









m

QuakKillz
January 27, 2008, 04:09 PM
And if you happen to plug someone's registered hunting dog they have about $5000 in you are going to be absolutely astonished at how bad your life gets and how fast it gets there.


I have about this much tied up in my lab....he DOES NOT go out w/o a leash on.... the above poster said the dogs were loose.... NO ONE that I know with high dollar hunters lets them "loose" near roadways....

The way I see it, if I'm stupid enough not to keep an eye on my dogs, I deserve to lose them....

Shawnee
January 27, 2008, 04:14 PM
Whew ! :eek: Probably got nailed so fast it wouldn't have mattered if he was "carrying" or not !

Was riding my Kaw KZ-650 in Custer National Park - about 40mph - when I came around a little knoll and there were about 30 Bison standing on and beside the road. Barely got stopped just a few feet short of hitting one - and then was sitting there wishing my bike been made with a "reverse" gear... or a Tommy gun.:eek: The Bison looked unhappy and, thus motivated, I got turned around and outtathere faster than I've ever thought it possible. Didn't take but about an hour to get my heart started again. :o

Shawnee
January 27, 2008, 04:24 PM
"The way I see it, if I'm stupid enough not to keep an eye on my dogs, I deserve to lose them...."

Well Quak... you get to choose your attitude about your dogs and if you don't mind losing them it's your business.
But a judge is still not going to believe someone had the right to shoot your dog no matter what you think and the cyclist who does is still going to receive a large dose of consequences from the judge, and maybe worse from the lawyer of an owner who doesn't feel the way you do.

And anyway -

Dog Shoots Man in Self-DefenseThursday, September 09, 2004

AP - PENSACOLA, Fla. — A man who was trying to shoot seven puppies was shot himself when one of the dogs made the .38-caliber revolver discharge, deputies said.

Jerry Allen Bradford, 37, of Pensacola, was charged with felony animal cruelty, the Escambia County Sheriff's Office said Wednesday.

Bradford was being treated at an undisclosed hospital for the gunshot wound to his wrist, said sheriff's Sgt. Ted Roy.

Bradford said he decided to shoot the 3-month-old puppies in the head because he couldn't find another home for the shepherd-mix dogs (search), according to the sheriff's office.

On Monday, he was holding two puppies, one in his arms and another in his left hand, when the dog in his hand wiggled and put its paw on the trigger, making the gun discharge, the sheriff's report said.

The revolver and a rifle were seized from the home, deputies said.

Deputies found three of the puppies in a shallow grave outside Bradford's home, Roy said. The other four appeared to be in good health and were taken by Escambia County Animal Control (search), which planned to make them available for adoption.



:cool:

Kevin108
January 27, 2008, 04:33 PM
I think a bike and a rider are too easily separated so I always dress as I usually do - cargo shorts or jeans and a t-shirt or sweatshirt - when riding and carry at 4:00 with my CTAC. I have no illusions about the fact that I am no pro at 250 lbs on my $200 bike. The fancy garb is not for me but the security of my regular carry gun physically attached to me in it's regular place is.

Stevie-Ray
January 28, 2008, 11:24 PM
In the Michigan heat, I wear an Uncle Mike's Kydex OWB under a safety vest while biking.

geophysicishooter
January 29, 2008, 12:07 AM
The situation where a guys decides to 'euthanize' a litter of puppies is a totally different situation from a dog or pack of dogs running out in pursuit of a pack of cyclists riding on a public roadway. You don't own that road; the taxpayers do. Your dog has about as much right to harrass passing traffic as you do, which is none. Try standing on the side of the road and throwing sticks into the spokes of passing cyclist and see how long it takes for the sherrif's deputy to show up. Dogs are the responsibility of their owners and thereby so are their actions. Would you hold the same standard to a dog attack on pedestrains or runners/joggers travelling the same road? If so, what's the difference? If not, there inlies your prejudice.

A person on a bicycle has just as much right to protect himself as anyone else. Sporting spandex and mounting a $2500 bianchi doesn't negate your rights to self defense. I'd love to argue this case in court. People ride in the country because riding in the city is a deathwish and there's a light about every 200 pedal strokes whereas in the country, there is far less traffic, the road tends to be in better condition, and the distance between stop signs/traffic lights is measured in miles rather than city blocks.

And if you think this isn't an issue, I've got some scar tissue I'd like to show you. Fact is that 'bubba' thinks that the 'fancy boys in their skinny breeches' look funny and are worthy of their ridicule, abuse and assault.

Cyclists ride every saturday and sunday mornings and are typically gone by mid-afternoon. Country folk on the popular routes know this. Wrangle your mutts and let the 'fancy boys' ride their bikes and when supper time comes your can let your mutts back out.

doc2rn
January 29, 2008, 12:29 AM
I live in outside of Topeka, Ks. I have been run into by two cyclist while walking, hit once by one while getting the mail, and been stalled on a road and laughed at when they where coverring both lanes to keep me from passing, when two of them did not get out of the way of an on coming car. Yup hood ornaments. I sat there and waited to tell the Sherriff exactly what they where up to, and yes they all got tickets. I think that around here if you cant keep up with the old timer driving a Galaxy 500 at 30 mph you need to make some room. My neighbors ride Harleys and they tell me one of the things they do is toss tennis balls at the spokes of rude cyclist or sticks. This may sound callous but after what I have seen and put up with I think cyclist should be confined to training/ riding in the desert.

Phydeaux642
January 29, 2008, 12:35 AM
It seems the thread has gotten just a little off topic. That seems to happen quite a lot.:evil:

_________________

"Phydeaux, bad dog....no biscuit!"

geophysicishooter
January 29, 2008, 01:01 AM
So your biker friends just decide which cyclists are rude and act and judge, jury, and executioner? sounds high road to me.. tossing sticks or tennis balls into the spokes of a cyclist doing 25 mph could put that guy in the hospital. That's assault. I've known people that have been put in the hospital by motorists and cases where people have been killed are not unheard of.

Think about the fact that that's a person on that bike, a fellow american, your neighbor. Wouldn't you feel like an ass if you decided to take out some road rage on a 'rude cyclist' only to find out that person was your doctor, dentist, lawyer, your boss. ??? your son, your daughter, your wife or husband???

If cyclists need to be relegated to riding in the desert, maybe we should decide that you can only practice your shooting out in the swamp. Take away someone's rights because it inconveniences you and someone will decide that what you do inconveniences them and they'll take your rights away..

funny how a bunch of rkba'ers want to curb the rights of cyclists to go and pursue their happiness in the way they see fit but you jump up and down and run around in tight little circles at the very suggestion that your gun rights might be curbed in the slightest of ways..

Don't be a hyppocrite, be an American. Stand up for someone else's rights and someone might stand up for yours one day.

Shawnee
January 29, 2008, 02:38 AM
Hi "Geo"...

You write... "Cyclists ride every saturday and sunday mornings and are typically gone by mid-afternoon. Country folk on the popular routes know this. Wrangle your mutts and let the 'fancy boys' ride their bikes and when supper time comes your can let your mutts back out."

LOLOLOL !! :D

That self-serving announcment that others must get out of your way is an absolutely perfect exhibition of the common cyclist "It's All about Me" attitude that generates so much hostility toward (and so little sympathy for) the cyclist clan.
You may think those "country folk" (that you so clearly look down upon ) need to cede their neighborhood to you and your cycling friends whenever you say so, but - inconceivable as this is - they actually might think differently.
How would you like it if those "country Folk" all came to your neighborhood to walk all their dogs and they told you that you had to "wrangle your children" and keep them in the house (in your own neighborhood) until they were done using your neighborhood to walk their dogs? And would you be the first person to City Hall crying for an ordinance to make the dog-walkers carry "pooper-scoopers"?

As I said in my first post - I, personally, think it is a bad idea for cyclists to "carry" and one major reason for that opinion is that the relationship between cyclists and the driving Public (and a lot of the rest of the Public) is already "too charged" as it is. For the cyclist to introduce a firearm into an already-volatile situation seems like a step in the wrong direction to me. It seems like an "escalation" when what is really needed is a de-escalation. It sounds like you want to carry a gun so you can enforce your self-given "right" to be rude to, and enforce your self-awarded "supremecy" over, all others. How would you like it if all the of hikers decided to "carry" so they could enforce their supremecy over cyclists ?

Everyone gets to decide the "carry-on-the-bike" matter their own way. But it sounds like a poor idea to me.


Local opinion may vary, of course. :cool:

geophysicishooter
January 29, 2008, 11:37 AM
Shawnee,

No, It's not "all about me"; it just ain't all about you either. Law says a cyclist has just as much right to the road as anyone. In fact, the law says that's where cyclists are required to ride as opposed to sidewalks. I repeat, you don't own that road, the taxpayers do. and a dog owner is as responsible for what his dog does as he is for what his minor child does. And a dog can has no more 'right' to go out into a public road way and harrass cyclist as he does to go into the same road and harrass anyone else.. what's so hard abot that?

Are there rude cyclists out there that make people mad and abuse their right to the road? sure there are. but the same can be said about any group of road users; you just happen not to notice them as easily.

Inside all the lycra and spandex and inside that helmet is a human being. Hitting them with your truck, throwing something into his spokes, running them off the road, and throwing things out the window at them carries the potential of KILLING them. I've been in packs of cyclist out on country roads and there is rarely an incident between motorists and cyclists that isn't escalated by the motorist. A bike wieghs 20 pounds, that truck weighs 3500 pounds. Newton is not on the cyclists' side. It ain't a fair fight. In the Truck v. cyclist track record, truck is undefeated.

I'd venture a guess that the behaviour you consider 'rude' is from those that are new to the sport and haven't figured out that it's not in their interest to ride 3 and 4 abreast. Soon they'll figure it out. Either that or Darwin will get them sooner or later. But there's no way that even 20 cyclists should be in your way if they're riding like they should be, which is in a pace line. And on a road with shoulders there's no reason they should 'be in your way' at all. In what world is it that you live in that grants you the right to use your vehicle as a weapon against anyone? But if someone's riding a bike then it's open season, right? Talk about self serving. You sit in your driver's seat and act as judge and jury.

-------------------------------

Just up on Fox News is a story about a drunk driver that hit a cyclist and is reported to be laughing about the incident during a jail house phone call. Classy.. The man she hit was killed in the incident. It was reported that the woman was driving with a suspended license due to a prior DUI.

-------------------------------

Show some consideration for your fellow man. I don't look down on 'country folk' in general. I do not look favourably on the rowdy teens in the pick up truck who decides it's funny to hassle, honk at or pass threateningly close to a cyclist. It's bumpkinism at it's finest. That cyclist isn't doing anything to you; you just want to think he is.

MillCreek
January 29, 2008, 12:12 PM
I am not too keen on the concept of motorcycle riders deciding to hurl tennis balls and sticks at cyclists. Unless of course the motorcycle riders think it would be OK for me to hurl beer bottles and 2x4s at them when I am in my truck.

A little mutual courtesy goes a long way on the road.

Shawnee
January 29, 2008, 12:54 PM
No matter what The Law or your magazine says, cycle traffic mixed with auto/truck/Winnebago traffic poses a definite hazard and the allowing of that mix is wrong. Period.

If a legislature believes cyclists should be on the road then they need to come up with the money to build safe cycle lanes/areas. Period.

Fact is: cyclists don't "belong" on most of our current streets and roads one bit more than skate boards and motorboats belong there. Period.

No responsible person wants to be in an accident. They surely don't want to cause an accident and they certainly don't want or harm/kill someone. Surely an elderly person (like maybe one of your parents or grandparents) for whom loss of their driver's license may well mean loss of the ability to live in their independant home is terrified of anything (horse, cycle, ATV, Go-cart, motorcycle, large truck) that presents the chance of involving them in an accident.

But every time any driver comes upon a cyclist their alarm bells have to start clanging because they don't know what that cyclist is going to do right in front of them. And because they may not be able to see the cyclist well enough to get passed them at a safe, comfortable distance - for a variety of reasons (like the driver of a Winnebago up on Trail Ridge Rd. in Colorado, or reflection on their windshield, et al). The presence of that cyclist always makes the driving (of the vehicles the roads were designed for) hazardous and, to many, nerve-wracking.
How many times has it been most convenient for you to ride early or late in the day - when the sun is low enough to blind drivers with direct light or reflection ? How many times have you ridden East or West - during a lower Sun that may have made you virtualy invisible to people in cars until it may be too late for them to react safely to your presence ? How many times has Ethyl Schwartz, height 4'11", buzzed you in her Caddy - not from meaness - but because she can judge distance to large objects like parked cars but not as well the distance to small, moving unpredictable objects like a cyclist ? Should she be removed from the road just because you want to ride your bike where it really doesn't belong ? No. The local politicians should be hung for putting that small, quickly-moving, unpredictable vehicle on the same road with Ethyl !

It's not that those people "hate" cyclists or they are bad people - it's because the presence of a cyclist (or 50) presents them with an unaccustomed and/or dangerous situation for which they could face substantial consequences and they are not wrong to not want that.
I rode a motorcycle for 20 years and know exactly what you're talking about re: knuckleheads and people of lesser driving ability in cars. But the onus was on me to make sure I was safe just like it is when I'm on horseback and just like it's on YOU when you're riding your bike. The roads were not built for my horse, or your bike or someone else's ATV, or someone else's Boston Whaler. Period.

That's why I said earlier that cyclists, like hunters, really need to be policing their ranks with a vengeance. They need to learn and preach de-escalation, not escalation. They also should (IMHO) look for every opportunity to get legislatures and local governments to provide safe cycing areas, even if it means retrofitting some current roads.
Yes, I know that can be a tough effort - thank God The Minority doesn't rule everything - yet. But it is the only truly good solution.

All things considered, I still have to stand by the position that a cyclist who "carries" is very probably making a mistake that exposes them to an unacceptable level of risk. Cyclists had better reallize the courts recognize "road rage" as punishable regardless of what vehicle one was driving, AND regardless of who got hurt the worst !!! If you open up on, or even threaten somneone with a gun, after they ran you off the road it is going to be YOU taking showers with prison soap. I think cyclists and CCW-types also need to realize what the Anit-gun media is going to do about the third time some hot-headed cyclist pulls a gun on somebody.

Local opinion may vary. :cool:

Yehen
January 29, 2008, 01:11 PM
In the little basket on the front =)

Sorry, just had to.

geophysicishooter
January 29, 2008, 01:43 PM
Shawnee,

Passing off your opinion as fact doesn't make it fact. It's still opinion. If you think that the 'legislature' needs to address this issue, then write your congressman. Don't take it out on people just trying to get into or stay in shape.

I suppose we'll agree that we stand on opposite sides of this issue. Carrying a gun brings with it a terrible responsibilty that each must manage on his own. I don't and probably never will carry while I'm riding for my own reasons but if someone thinks they need to carry one while riding, I'll not be the one to tell him he can't or shouldn't.

As for 'bike lanes', I think they're the worst thing ever for cyclists. They are rarely well enough maintained as to be safely navigable and futher entrenches the notion that cyclists don't belong on the roadways. What's more they take lane space away from the main lanes which further aggitates the feelings of motorists when they see 8 ft of lane that 'no one is using' and that 'my tax dollars paid for'. All this goes to further entrench animosity towards cyclists and when they do see someone on their bike they manifest all that animosity into aggression towards the cyclist which inturn puts the cyclists into an us v them mentality.

And who is to pay for these bike lanes? More taxpayer money that people will see as special interest pork barrel waste that could be going towards any number of other 'more pressing' problems.

Finally old folks who can't safely drive shouldn'y be on the road. they're as much a danger to me on my bike as they are to you in your dually.

To equate a cyclist being on the road to a (what was it?) Boston Whaler is purposeful muddying of the waters in a debate you know you can't win. :cool:

Vern Humphrey
January 29, 2008, 01:55 PM
I used to do a lot of cycling, and I often wondered -- here's a cyclist pumping his way up a hill, the sweat pouring off him. And a fat slob in a car comes up behind him -- and is annoyed because he has to tap on the brake to avoid killing a fellow human.

geophysicishooter
January 29, 2008, 01:58 PM
I used to do a lot of cycling, and I often wondered -- here's a cyclist pumping his way up a hill, the sweat pouring off him. And a fat slob in a car comes up behind him -- and is annoyed because he has to tap on the brake to avoid killing a fellow human.

Inconvenient, isn't it. What a hassle it must be.

cyclist
January 29, 2008, 02:00 PM
No matter what The Law or your magazine says, cycle traffic mixed with auto/truck/Winnebago traffic poses a definite hazard and the allowing of that mix is wrong. Period.

If a legislature believes cyclists should be on the road then they need to come up with the money to build safe cycle lanes/areas. Period.

Fact is: cyclists don't "belong" on most of our current streets and roads one bit more than skate boards and motorboats belong there. Period.

I'll just agree to disagree with you on this one, no need to get into a flamefest here, I will simply say you are completely and totally wrong. To say what you say is like saying it is wrong to mix Winnebago and SemiTruck traffic on the same roads as compact cars, let alone throwing motorcycles into the mix.

Did you know that the first paved roads in this country were apparently paved in consideration of and for bicycle riders? Then along came the motorized vehicles and messed the whole plan up.

Chicken or egg, which came first? Doesn't matter because when it comes to dinner time either one will do. :evil:

cyclist
January 29, 2008, 02:14 PM
Here's a link to an older thread with some neat pics on it showing ways to carry a rifle on a bicycle.
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=235740

bltmonty
January 29, 2008, 02:41 PM
Wow, the lack of tolerance for cyclists is amazing to me...but that's been well addressed by my fellow cyclists.

I ride to work everyday on my bike. I like it, and it's saving lots of energy and money.

I use a Camelbak rogue hydration backpack and carry my makarov in its bike tube pump pocket. I created a velcro retainer strap for it so it does not fall out. It is well protected, secure, and easy to reach for. I just pull up the backpack with my left hand and reach behind my back with my right hand.

I know there's tons of road rage against cyclists, which is one reason I carry. Another reasons is that we are incredibly vulnerable many times--out on the road in the middle of nowhere with no chance to escape an assault. How dare fellow RKBA people tell me that I cannot carry on my bike.:cuss:

Vern Humphrey
January 29, 2008, 02:49 PM
Wow, the lack of tolerance for cyclists is amazing to me...but that's been well addressed by my fellow cyclists.
You just don't realize how annoying it is -- and how much effort it takes -- to lift one's foot off the gas pedal and tap on the brake.:barf:

cyclist
January 29, 2008, 03:11 PM
Just because I know someone will demand "proof", here is Wiki-proof:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Roads_Movement

:cool:

And when I'm on my motorcycle on a holiday weekend on some back country road I just wish all those RV's would just take the highway or use the vehicle pullouts. :neener:

As far as getting back on topic goes, I think if I were to carry while on a bicycle I would opt for one of those top-tube hanging bags and just drop the pistol in there. Three or four rips of velcro and it is easy enough to take with me when I leave the bicycle, or at least it would be if I were to do that, which (Doyle be danged) isn't entirely an option in Wisconsin yet, hopefully soon, but not just yet.

http://www.nordicgroup.us/s78/images/NA-FRB2.gif

http://www.abikestore.com/Merchant2/graphics/00000004/police-frame-bag.jpg

Bet you didn't know there was a Police Bicycle Store on-line, remember that next time any of you decide to hassle a cyclist on the road or trail. ;)

http://www.policebikestore.com/bags.htm

geophysicishooter
January 29, 2008, 04:30 PM
I like the idea of carrying in the camelback. I can't imagine trying to carry on my body while riding. I can't stand for my keys to be in any of my pockets much less a two pound handgun.

Cosmoline
January 29, 2008, 04:48 PM
Lots of good suggestions. I carry either in the jacket pocket or in a modified shoulder rig I put together from various parts. But then again I've almost always got a jacket or cover shirt on when I ride. Cosmo don't do spandex ;-) Not at 10 below anyway.

I've actually carried my rifles quite a bit back and forth to the range for exercise. They ride well on a B.O.B. cart or on my custom made scabbard system:

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b52/Gussick/bike2-2.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xz1IdG928ns

Cosmoline
January 29, 2008, 04:57 PM
Fact is: cyclists don't "belong" on most of our current streets and roads one bit more than skate boards and motorboats belong there. Period

I actually have to wait for cars on the downtown streets more than they have to wait for me. I was just ringing my bell at some slow woman in an SUV this morning. Of course I stay off the main roads and highways unless I have a good right hand area or a bike lane. But I can get around on side streets extremely well, and indeed as fast or faster than a motor vehicle.

What's really hilarious is when some thimblebrain thinks they can pass me because I'm only going 15 in a 15 zone. I crank on the juice and they end up roaring through a stop sign at forty. One fellow who tried to pull that on an icy intersection last year and landed sideways in a ditch. That was pure poetry.

mpmarty
January 29, 2008, 04:57 PM
Lets see here, lets do a bit of math:

Average mileage of an auto is probably around 25mpg now.
Tax here is right at a dollar a gallon. So car drivers pay four cents a mile for the use of the roads. License fees and drivers licenses are right up there also. Lets have all the damn cyclists pay four cents a mile to ride on our roads and make them license their stupid pedalmobiles and get cyclist licenses after passing tests. When that happens, I'll gladly extend them the same courtesy I would to any other driver or motorcycle rider. Until then, no f***ing way! Get outa my way, get off my property and don't give me any **** or this old man will rain all over your parade and make you wish you'd had a root canal planned instead.:)

cyclist
January 29, 2008, 05:03 PM
Ah the falacy of thinking that gas taxes pay for roadways. Would you also charge pedestrians for crossing at cross walks? And just who pays for sidewalks? Start collecting children's lunch monies.:rolleyes:

The corelary (sp?) to this is to start charging smog fees to car drivers and give smog credits to cyclists and pedestrians for each mile commuted. Believe it or not, this concept has actually been debated and considered in some districts in some states.

YMMV. Have a nice day, play again soon, it was fun. :cool:

Cosmoline
January 29, 2008, 05:04 PM
Marty, the world's tinest brass bell is ringing just for you ;-)

What amazes me is these drivers who STILL give me a hard time when I'm clearly carrying an enormous RIFLE on my bicycle. They certainly do trust in my inner goodness.

cyclist
January 29, 2008, 05:16 PM
Reminds me of a movie, I think it was Quigley Down Under possibly.

Good guy stops horse and steps down and de-scabbards his rifle.
Nearby companion panics and starts to complain that the bad guy(s) is getting away.
Good guy just smiles, takes his time, takes carefull aim, bang, bad guy goes down.
Nearby companion doesn't say much.

Maybe it was in The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly.

Anyway, now I've got this sequence in my head and it will remain there until my next bicycle ride. Smile driver, just keep smiling in your mirror. ;)

Back on topic, I still like the idea of something not carried on the rider's body for on-bike carry yet still being relatively quick to detach or secure.

Phydeaux642
January 29, 2008, 05:19 PM
Fact is: cyclists don't "belong" on most of our current streets and roads one bit more than skate boards and motorboats belong there. Period.

Lets see here, lets do a bit of math:

Average mileage of an auto is probably around 25mpg now.
Tax here is right at a dollar a gallon. So car drivers pay four cents a mile for the use of the roads. License fees and drivers licenses are right up there also. Lets have all the damn cyclists pay four cents a mile to ride on our roads and make them license their stupid pedalmobiles and get cyclist licenses after passing tests. When that happens, I'll gladly extend them the same courtesy I would to any other driver or motorcycle rider. Until then, no f***ing way! Get outa my way, get off my property and don't give me any **** or this old man will rain all over your parade and make you wish you'd had a root canal planned instead.

Wow! Sounds like a couple of people here have missed their nap.:neener:

It also seems to me that the U.S. is one of the only nations in the world where motorists almost hate cyclists. That seems odd to me when you take into account all of the benefits of cycling. And, like I have said before, I now carry because people ignore leash laws and some people seem to think it is their lot in life to try and run me down just for sport. I can take all of the cussing you can give me, you can toss water on me as you pass, etc., but if you try to run me down (as I have had people do for no reason other than they were out looking for trouble) then I have a right to protect myself. When it gets to that point, a vehicle trying to run me down can be considered assualt with a deadly weapon. So, I leave with my Keltec P32 in my pocket or my 642 in my Smartcarry.

________________________

"Phydeaux, bad dog....no biscuit!"

wheelgunslinger
January 29, 2008, 05:41 PM
I think the debate is very different for different communities.
In small mountain towns where I've lived, there were maybe 2 ways to get across town if you needed to do so. Having cyclists on both roads made them impassable. Which I thought was pretty self absorbed and showed very bad judgement on their part. People use roads to go places like work, appointments, and such. Bikes can really hold people up and be a pain.
But, in larger cities, it's not such a big deal because of road construction and such.

Whether there were people throwing slushies at me or hitting me with their fenders or not, I'd still carry.
And, it's likely I'd use a back holster for a large frame revolver. That way anyone going around could see it and it would be easy to reach. Or, I'd strap a pistol to the frame of the bike by fabricating some aluminum mounts.

cyclist
January 29, 2008, 06:07 PM
In small mountain towns where I've lived, there were maybe 2 ways to get across town if you needed to do so. Having cyclists on both roads made them impassable. Which I thought was pretty self absorbed and showed very bad judgement on their part.

How is it self absorbed if there are only two roads and if the bicycle rider wants to ride across town? And how exactly were they impassable? Couldn't you pass them????? And if the roads were that impassable then wouldn't the same self abosrbant logic be ascribed to someone driving a large RV across town or someone towing a trailer across town? I've lived in small mountain towns with narrow winding roads, you just deal with it and pass when you can safely do so. Expecting a cyclist to walk in the ditch everytime a car approaches is fairly self absorbed of the car driver. A little patience goes a long way.

Wisconsin has a pedestrian right of way rule, yet every week I see some pedestrian in a crosswalk nearly get run down and honked at by some impatient driver wanting to drive 35+mph in a 25mph zone.

This country is sorely lacking in consideration and respect for others, at least it seems that way at times.

Oh well, have a nice day anyway. Heading home shortly to wait for the storm that approaches. Maybe I'll use my Farm&Fleet gift cards to purchase a bag for the bike pistol this week. :scrutiny:

MillCreek
January 29, 2008, 06:09 PM
To Mpmarty above, I suspect most cyclists also own cars, have drivers licenses, pay gas taxes and drive on the same roads upon which they ride a bicycle. I know I do.

cyclist
January 29, 2008, 06:19 PM
In the interest of THR, I'm stepping out of this thread, have a nice ride.

mpmarty
January 29, 2008, 06:56 PM
With all due respect, and no threat intended, as a motorcycle rider that averages over seven thousand miles a year, and carries: Don't even think of using a handgun for self defense when a cage driver decides to punch your ticket. Get the hell off the road. I've never seen a cyclist win a collision with a four wheeler, whether the collision was intentional or not, you, the cyclist get the dirty end of the stick and going head to head with motor vehicle makes little or no sense for a pedestrian and you aren't any better off than a jogger when it comes to defending yourself from being run down.

Phydeaux642
January 29, 2008, 08:38 PM
In the interest of THR, I'm stepping out of this thread, have a nice ride.


+1. Adios.

_______________________

"Phydeaux, bad dog....no biscuit!"

Comanche180
January 29, 2008, 10:22 PM
Hey Millcreek

I stick to paved roads when on my bike and I ride alone most of the time. I had an unusual experience one day, I crested a hill and there was a big buck whitetail with a very nice rack. He saw me and put his head down and started towards me. U-turn was the better part of valor that day and luckily he wasn't interested in chasiing.

MillCreek
January 29, 2008, 11:34 PM
Now why don't I ever encounter those sort of situations when I have my camera with me?

OldCowHand
January 30, 2008, 01:12 AM
I used to have a part-time job driving a delivery truck for a local retailer. I'd ride my bike to work, load up the truck, strap my bike somewhere away from the cargo, deliver stuff all evening, then unload the bike and ride home. As a result, on any given evening I was by turns the biggest and smallest vehicle on the road. I frequently found it ironic that cars got just as annoyed at my slowness when I was in truck mode as when I was in bike mode, but were much more aggressive in the latter case. It seems to have come down to sheer size and the perception of risk: pure law of the jungle, on the streets and roads of Oregon ...

bwavec
January 30, 2008, 03:10 AM
x2 on the Safepacker.

I also like to sing the praises of the Camelbak Goblin.....and oversized fanny pack that you can carry a hydration bladder in (which makes not raise any alarm) but with a tearaway to access a holstered firearm. I like mine alot, and use the Camelbak often.

F1
February 2, 2008, 02:29 AM
Lets see here, lets do a bit of math:

Average mileage of an auto is probably around 25mpg now.
Tax here is right at a dollar a gallon. So car drivers pay four cents a mile for the use of the roads. License fees and drivers licenses are right up there also. Lets have all the damn cyclists pay four cents a mile to ride on our roads and make them license their stupid pedalmobiles and get cyclist licenses after passing tests. When that happens, I'll gladly extend them the same courtesy I would to any other driver or motorcycle rider. Until then, no f***ing way! Get outa my way, get off my property and don't give me any **** or this old man will rain all over your parade and make you wish you'd had a root canal planned instead.
__________________
Marty in Oregon
Semper Fi


Someone like this shouldn't be allowed to drive or carry a gun.

Stevie-Ray
February 2, 2008, 04:23 AM
Some of the attitudes toward cyclists on here have proven much better than I could, that not only do I carry while biking, I need to carry.:rolleyes:

Talk about low road on The High Road

A cop drove next to me for a few seconds and remarked that with the lights and my safety vest, he wished "all cyclists were as visible" as me.

slide
February 2, 2008, 01:02 PM
I'm surprised by the amount of hatred tossed at we who ride bicycles. I'm used to it when I mention I ride motorcycles. I've always figured that's some sort of hangover from the Hells Angels mythology but bicycles? How can these motorists be angry at bicyclists? If there ever was a peaceful non-threatening bunch of sprout munchers, it's wheelmen.

I'm only glad that in my area I've only personally encountered courtesy but we've had some actions on the part of motorists which were negligent to the point of being aggressive. What's troubling to me and some others is that the LEO's take the attitude when one of us is killed of, "What did you expect if you ride a bicycle on public roads?"

They do in all but one case where a police was killed. That stirred them up for that one case.

Vern Humphrey
February 2, 2008, 01:12 PM
I'm surprised by the amount of hatred tossed at we who ride bicycles. I'm used to it when I mention I ride motorcycles. I've always figured that's some sort of hangover from the Hells Angels mythology but bicycles? How can these motorists be angry at bicyclists? If there ever was a peaceful non-threatening bunch of sprout munchers, it's wheelmen.

I long ago learned that people who spend all they make and go into debt really resent those who save and invest. Those who didn't serve in the military -- especially in wartime -- resent those who did. Those who didn't go to college resent those who did -- especially those who worked their way through. And those who don't exercise resent those who do.

slide
February 2, 2008, 01:25 PM
Maybe you are on to something here, Vern. The anecdotes I've heard from wheelmen who have had incidents with autos seem to stem from cagers' frustrations. Frex, a huge traffic jam with a bicycle threading through can trigger a car driver to attack the bike to prevent him from proceeding where the car can't.

As to the military, the mom of one of my daughter's friends was impressed (not entirely to the positive) by her gardener. This guy dressed in fatigues and carried a huge bayonet at his waist. She wondered to me what he did in the military and I said, "He wasn't in". She asked and, of course, I was right.

You ever notice how fierce those who've never seen action seem to often carry themselves?

MillCreek
February 2, 2008, 03:08 PM
And just this very morning, I read elsewhere on the site of the new .380 pistol from Ruger announced at the Shot Show. Within just a smidgen of the size and weight of the Kel-Tec .380, but with a locked breech design. MSRP of $ 330 in blued. If they come out with this in stainless, I would have to give serious thought to this as a new bicycle pistol.

Rexster
February 2, 2008, 05:39 PM
mpmarty, you may not be as anonymous on the web as you think, and should you strike a cyclist in the future, you had better hope no DA or plaintiff's council sees your post about raining on a cyclist's parade. Intent is the key to prosecution, and you just stated it very publicly. Edited to add: Is this THR, or TLR? Advocating the commission of a felony sounds pretty low to me.

stellarpod
February 2, 2008, 08:29 PM
Used to be an avid "roadie" cyclist - averaging a couple of hundred miles per week.

That was MANY years (and MANY pounds ago). At 52 I'm just now attempting to re-establish enough of a health baseline to hopefully start riding again. I've seen it all in my years peering over the handlebars. As a cyclist, I was more mindful of rules of the road. I was also more aware of the tons of trash that Americans mindlessly throw to the curb. These bottles and cans become more than trivial obstacles when your riding skinny tires.

As a licensed concealed-carrier I will not shelve my right of self defense just because I'm on a bicycle on the road. The intent of carrying is to have the means to defend one's self if the need arises. It is just as apt to arise on a bicycle as it is anywhere else. Shawnee seems to think it is MORE apt to arise. Taking a position that we should or should not carry based upon the likelihood of an angry situation escalating into a shooting spree very unwittingly plays into the hands of the anti's. It is PRECISELY THE SAME ARGUEMENT THEY MAKE AGAINST ALL CONCEAL-CARRY. "There will be blood in the streets at every road-rage incident", blah, blah, blah... :rolleyes:

I am no less protected by the 2nd Amendment on my bicycle than I am in my car. The same rights apply. If Shawnee, the interface between cyclist and the average motorist are as dire as you portray, then I would argue we have MORE need for a firearm when riding. I have been found mentally competent by my state to carry in concealed fashion and I don't check that competency at the door when I climb onto a bicycle.

NOW, all that being said...

Having survived more than my share of road-rash from crashes on pavement, the thought of having any kind of handgun in my jersey or on my body gives me crash visions of huge meaty gouges, bleeding wounds. For this reason, I will opt to carry on the bike itself, rather than my person. I've got a pretty slick little pack that mounts between my aerobar clip-ons that is the perfect place for a J-frame Airweight.

The Camelback option does have merit however.

stellarpod

Kevin108
February 2, 2008, 08:31 PM
I think the dislike of PEOPLE riding the bikes is misplaced, but I also think the BIKES do belong only on roads with 25 mph limits OR bike lanes. I drive daily and ride as often as I can. I live in an urban area with a speed limit of 25 mph and seldom do I ride away from this area. I have a mountain bike and I take full advantage of it's capabilities to ride medians and sidewalks where I see fit.

Brian Williams
February 2, 2008, 11:11 PM
This is now gone the way of the crusier, not much about what and how to carry but the gripes about bike and cars.

I stuck a fork in it, it is dun.

If you enjoyed reading about "What's The Best Way To Carry A Handgun On A Bike?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!