case problems


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ammopoor
February 9, 2008, 10:04 PM
I found some cases at the range took them home and put them in media cleaner. They had to be old because of the tarnished exteriors and the tumbler obviously didn't bring them back to a high shine. Went ahead and loaded and went back to range to shoot and many of the older cases would jam. I checked overall lengths which were within .050 either way.If the cases don't look like brand new does this create issues? The older cases had no dents or impressions what went wrong? Other loads out of same batch worked they were the real pretty ones. Helppp

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Idano
February 9, 2008, 10:12 PM
ammopoor,

Scrounged brass, not steel or aluminum, regardless of the age once cleaned, resized, trimmed, and inspected should reload just like new. I would say 90% of my brass is range pick up either by me or boughten used. Make sure you are doing a full length resize! Measure a reloaded round against the specs in one of the reloading manuals too, if they are in spec there is no reason why they should stick regardless of the tarnish.

ranger335v
February 9, 2008, 10:23 PM
Surface coloration will have no effect on function. But, a 50 thousants variation both ways, for a max difference of .1 inch sure will. ??

I wonder if you loaded the clean brass at the same time as the stained brass? My guess is that it was loaded as a seperate batch and you simply didn't get it fully resized, especially important if you're shooting an autoloader.

Soak your tarnished brass in white vinegar for 2-3 hours to remove the surface oxidation, dry and tumble normally to restore the shine.

ammopoor
February 9, 2008, 10:24 PM
Idano,

When picking up pistol brass do you check for case length also? Doesn't the resizer die in the Lee deluxe pistol die set bring the case to proper diameter?

birdbustr
February 9, 2008, 10:26 PM
ranger335v. You read my mind completely. Has to be a sizing issue. I don't think the brass was resized to the proper specs. Did'nt know about the vinegar though.

ammopoor
February 9, 2008, 10:29 PM
I apologize guys the OAL varies from 1.208 to 1.216 by the way these are .45 200gr berry FN

Idano
February 10, 2008, 12:07 AM
ammopoor,

I didn't know from your original post that you talking about pistol brass. I don't check pistol brass length any more, it will either split or belly before it will grow beyond maximum length. However, I suspect the brass you picked up may be extremely bellied from either over use or from being shot in a loose chamber like a Glock. Pistol brass can develop a belly that extends below top of the shell plate where your resizer die can not reach. My advice is get yourself a good case gauge and check ever one to make sure it fits. I always toss those that don't fit, over time the bellying gets to the point that the integrity of the web gets compromised and you can have a rupture.

cdrt
February 10, 2008, 08:24 AM
Soak your tarnished brass in white vinegar for 2-3 hours to remove the surface oxidation, dry and tumble normally to restore the shine.

You may want to cut the vinegar with some water, add a teaspoon of salt and the same of detergent. If you leave it too long, the brass may turn a pink color. It usually doesn't take 2 to 3 hours to bring back brass back to a more acceptable appearance. I only soak it for 10-15 minutes.

The Bushmaster
February 10, 2008, 09:47 AM
Whoa cdrt...2 to 3 hours? Hold on just a minute... I can see that this may cause a bit of a problem...You only need to soak them for 15 to 20 minutes to do the job. Use a solution of 1 pint of water, 1 cup of white vinegar, 1 tablespoon of salt, and 1 tablespoon of dishwashing liquid. Agitate every few minutes and flush with hot water and dry. Tumble the dry brass for an hour. Even with this solution there is contraversy as to how it will effect the brass. Some say adversely. But 2 to 3 hours WILL adversely effect (weaken) the brass...

jonnyc
February 10, 2008, 01:33 PM
The brass didn't happen to have an "A-MERC" headstamp, did it? I accidentally reloaded a few of those and they wouldn't chamber.

cdrt
February 10, 2008, 01:50 PM
Whoa cdrt...2 to 3 hours?

You might read what I posted and not what the guy in front of me (ranger335v) put on.

I said that 2-3 hours was too much or words to that effect. I only let them soak for 10 to 15 minutes in the vinegar/water/salt/detergent solution. And lets give credit where it's due; the original recipe for this mixture is in a NRA pub on the .45 pistol.

Soaking them longer probably won't do any harm since we're talking vinegar and not ammonia, but they will turn pink.

The Bushmaster
February 10, 2008, 02:56 PM
Sorry 'bout that cdrt...Missed that. The publication must be rather old though. At least before Tupper Ware bowls and lids...I got that recipe (and a couple of others) from www.geocities.com around 10 years ago...

cdrt
February 10, 2008, 03:04 PM
No problem. The pub is an NRA reprint titled The .45 Automatic. It was first published in 1953. Mine is a reprint from 1971 that I picked up at Bob Chow's gun shop back in 1975. Not sure if the NRA still has it at the NRA Store.

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