.22 LR rifle


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jakemccoy
February 10, 2008, 04:46 AM
I'm looking for a good one. Any suggestions? I'm new to this caliber.

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Vityaz
February 10, 2008, 04:55 AM
The Ruger 10/22 is always good.

Bearhands
February 10, 2008, 04:59 AM
Man, you're gonna get a million suggestions! (a good thing!)

My .$02, Depending on your use and location,(plinking, hunting) a bolt action will serve you very well. There are TONS of choices out there. I'd suggest going to gun shops and shouldering a few of them to see which one "fits" the best. Then, snooping around the market for the best buy. Savage, Marlin are usually very "out-of-the-box" accurate and inexpensive. Winchester's Wildcat (Russian TOZ 78) Remington Mod 5 (by Zastava) are good bets, CZ's are super (more expensive) but as I said.. there are MANY 22 rifles out there. Best of luck in your hunt!
Now I'll let all the Ruger 10/22 guys chime in. ;)

HM2PAC
February 10, 2008, 05:15 AM
Bearhands is right, you're going to get a lot of different answers.

I like my 10/22 it is easy to upgrade by myself, accurate, reliable, and semi-auto. Magazine fed.

The Browning Buckmark rifle is a mag fed semi-auto that utilizes the same mag as the Buckmark pistol.

The Winchester Wildcat looks interesting. Marlin 60's are reliable and everywhere. The Marlin 60 is tube fed.

For a bolt-gun I would choose between the Savage and the Marlins.

Higher-end bolt-guns would be CZ, Weatherby XXII, Browning.

Lever guns are also available from Marlin, Henry.......

Long story short, there are a lot of choices for rimfire shooters. A good place to get even more information is:[url]http://www.rimfirecentral.com

357fan
February 10, 2008, 05:47 AM
I'd say pick an action type first, then settle on the gun.

Here are my personal choices:
Semi - 10/22
Bolt - Savage Mark II
Lever - Henry 001

As a side note, my Henry is my favorite long gun of all time. It's light, accurate, inexpensive and lots of fun. I can hit a soda can at 75 yards offhand, standing and with the original iron sights with ease. I love this gun.

HisDivineShadow
February 10, 2008, 05:56 AM
For levers I would put the Marlin 39 as the best rifle, could probably find used for a good price. Or if you get lucky you can also find a Winchester 9422, these two are the cream of the crop when it comes to rimfire levers. Personally I think you need one of each.

Some reading about rimfire levers:
http://www.leverguns.com/articles/marlin_vs_winchester.htm
http://www.gunhuntermag.com/features/051010Rimfire.htm

As for the semi option, well it's hard to argue with the 10/22 isn't it?

cat_IT_guy
February 10, 2008, 09:40 AM
Savage Mark II - bolt action, about $300 and quite accurate with a decent scope

aka108
February 10, 2008, 09:46 AM
Simply depends on how much money you want to spend. Anywhere from 100 bucks up to thousands. Acquaintence of mine is having a bench 22rf being built that is setting him back 18K. Marlin 60 is great in the low price market. Marlin 39A is a dreamer in the 400 buck range.

Vermont
February 10, 2008, 09:53 AM
I just got a Winchester Wildcat. I haven't shot it yet, so I can't comment on the accuracy. It comes with three 10 round magazines and one 5 round magazine. Pretty generous.

I had a tough time assembling the bolt the first time, but then I realized it was made entirely of metal and I should quit pussyfooting around and use some force and the thing twisted right together. The stock was nice. Not as pretty as the one on the Winchester website, but still nice.

I read one review where the reviewer said he had trouble getting the magazines in easily. I didn't have trouble with that, but getting them out is a little harder than it should be, but not a big deal. The magazine release is in an awkward position and you have to hold it down until the magazine slides out about an inch or two.

Other than that I am pleased with it. I'm hoping we get a warm day so I can see how it shoots, but I might just take it out in the snow.

The MSRP just went up from 230 to 269, so I guess they are selling plenty of them even though I don't hear much about them on THR.

gcrookston
February 10, 2008, 09:55 AM
My choices would be:

Semi: 10/22 Ruger
Lever: Marlin 39a
Bolt: Savage

tjj
February 10, 2008, 10:27 AM
CZ 452 American if you want a bolt gun.

1911NM
February 10, 2008, 11:06 AM
The question with .22 rifles is never which one, but how many. :D I agree with other posters to pick an action first, then look at guns. Since no one has brought up pump guns, Taurus has a slick looking copy of a Winchester gallery gun for a reasonable price. 10/22 is always a good starter, but .22's are just so much fun, and inexpensive (somewhat), pick one you like to start, and just go back to get more as finances and the fun permits. YMMV.

RockyMtnTactical
February 10, 2008, 12:21 PM
Ruger 10/22 for a semi (my preference).

CZ 452 for a bolt.

bannockburn
February 10, 2008, 01:40 PM
Same as RockyMtnPractical, but I would also add a Taurus pump gun for some old time plinking fun.

Ol` Joe
February 10, 2008, 01:44 PM
Ruger 10/22 for a semi (my preference).

CZ 452 for a bolt.

+1

MiddleAgedKen
February 10, 2008, 01:48 PM
Pump is also an option. I've never tried it myself, but folks who have rave about 'em. Henry and Taurus, I think, offer examples.

Average Joe
February 10, 2008, 01:50 PM
Ruger 10/22

rangerruck
February 10, 2008, 02:54 PM
if you are new to the 22, and looking for a rifle, get either a Marlin, cz, or Savage bolt action. for semi auto, get a marlin mod 60. these are all under 150 bucks, they are all reliable, they are all accurate.
DO NOT GET A RUGER 10.22. I have one, and like it very much, except i do
not consider it a beginners rifle, It needs mods and upgrades, at least another 100 bucks worth, just to make it remotely accurate, and function reliably.
You can typically get a marlin mod 60, for less than 80 bucks, at a pawn shop.
it would be better to go to a gunshop that has a used section. Ask if that gunshop has all it's trade ins and used stuff checked by a gunsmith.
Also, if you don't know how the rifle takes down, or works, don't be afraid to
ask the clerk. The guys at the gunshops are usually pretty helpful, at least they are In houston, and know what they are doing.
If looking for a pistol, get any revolver, so simple , usually a Taurus will fill
the bill, they come in switch bbls, 22 / mag , or 17hmr/ mach2.
For pistol, go with the simplest to take down, and they will also be very accurate, this would be the S&W 21A or the Beretta Neos. Both will be less than 230 bucks, and they require 1 button to push, or 1 thumbscrew to turn, to take down. Again, DO NOT GET A RUGER PISTOL. Unless you are handy, and can follow directions exactly, the ruger is simple to take down, but if you put it back together wrong, and do not follow the directions exactly, you will ruin it, or blow it up. Now the ruger is a great pistol, and has the rabbit ears for easy pull back on the bolt, it is so easy to pull , I had a couple of Grandma/Grandpa's at the range decide they would buy models just like mine, for home defense. they were both old and Artheritic, but they could both easily manipulate the mag release, and the bolt pull. this was on the ruger 22/45. easier mag release, than the MK I or II or III models.

CajunBass
February 10, 2008, 03:31 PM
A Ruger 10/22 is accurate enough for plinking and squirrel hunting right out of the box. No, it's not a match grade rifle, but it's not supposed to be. I've got two, I've done nothing to either except add scopes and they'll knock squirrels out of trees all day long if I do my part. When I miss, it ain't the guns fault.

Yes, the pistols do require you to follow the directions to strip them down and reassemble them. That hardly seems to be a major inconvience to me. Actually it sounds like a prudent thing to do. (I hardly ever clean mine, but that's a subject for another discussion.)

MCgunner
February 10, 2008, 03:38 PM
The question with .22 rifles is never which one, but how many.

Yep, that's exactly where I'm at. :D I LOVE rimfire rifles! I like bolts, single shots, autos, pumps (don't have one yet), levers (don't have one yet), whatever. IMHO there is no BAD .22!!!!! I even have a Charter Arms version of the AR7 I like that most people here seem to despise.

I guess my favorite is my first OLD Remington M512X bolt gun. But, my favorite plinker/utility rifle is my 10/22. It's a stainless gun, rugged goes everywhere with me. Iron sights on it, scopes on my other ones.

I'm going to get a Browning take down someday, beautiful little guns. I want a Marlin sometime or another, also, maybe a papoose. Those are handy and better built guns than my AR7. Ah, the .22 ain't made that I wouldn't like to own, really, but I'd probably still use my old Remington for hunting and my 10/22 as my utility .22. Just that .22s are so affordable and I just like owning them.

birdbustr
February 10, 2008, 03:40 PM
I agree with Rangerruck for the most part. I would recommend a Marlin 60 for a cheap good to go rifle out of the box. I also have a 10/22T and although I now have it shooting way better than my old Marlin, it took some additional $, parts and basic gun intuition to get it there. I wouldn't consider a 10/22 as an entry level .22 from my experiences either.

RNB65
February 10, 2008, 03:46 PM
Cz 452

woad_yurt
February 10, 2008, 11:04 PM
A Marlin 60 with a real scope!

MCgunner
February 10, 2008, 11:13 PM
My 10/22 will put 10 rounds of mini mag into an inch and a half at 50. It's bone stock. Granted, that's no target rifle, but how the heck accurate does a plinker need to be, even a squirrel rifle???? As a beginners gun, it works, does not jam, is easy to clean. I don't see a negative here. Yes, my old Remington will put 10 into a half inch at 50, it's more accurate, no more reliable or easy to live with, and both will tear up a coke can at 25 yards. :D One thing about the 10/22, it can grow with you if you want more accuracy later on.

Seafarer12
February 11, 2008, 09:47 AM
My Remington 572 Fieldmaster is one of the few guns I wouldn't sell. I would sell my 10/22 off in a heartbeat for the right offer. My 572 is just as accrurate as my bull barreled 10/22. It will cycle anything I put in it. With aguila super colibri ammo it is quieter than a powerful pellet gun. And its really nice looking too. I will admit it is an older model when craftsman ship was a little better.

MCgunner
February 11, 2008, 10:17 AM
My old Remington is a tube magazine fed bolt gun and I wouldn't sell it, either. I don't sell exceedingly accurate guns and that's what it is with just about ANYthing I feed it including CCI CB Short (the quiet ammo I use and can get at wallyworld). Being a bolt, it'll cycle shorts and I've killed a LOT of squirrel with CB shorts in that gun. I got that gun for my 9th birthday, owned it now for 44 years and it's still that accurate after God only knows how many rounds at the range, in the creek, at cans and furry creatures and paper targets.

I won't sell ANY gun I like, though, so the 10/22 isn't for sale, either. I keep the keepers and sell what I don't like and I'm about fixed up over the years with keepers. :D My old Remington is still a go to hunting rifle for small game and my 10/22 is my knock about .22, two different niches, really.

kwelz
February 11, 2008, 10:22 AM
Remington 597, Ruger 10/22, Marlin Model 60

Any of those three guns is a great starting point and you can't go wrong with any of them. I have owned all three, sold all three, and want all three back.

cmidkiff
February 11, 2008, 10:43 AM
If you want a reliable, accurate semi in .22, and don't want to spend time and money 'upgrading' it, skip the 10/22 and get a Thompson/Center Classic (or R55).

I have a 10/22, had to put a new extractor in it to get it to run at all, then needed a bolt release that I didn't have to futz around with, and a mag release that didn't require 3 hands to operate... still doesn't hold the bolt open after the last shot, the trigger is just bad, and it won't work with any of the 3rd party mags I've tried.

I've already spent more on the 'cheap' 10/22 as I did on a slightly used Thompson Classic, and the 10/22 still needs a bunch of work to even get close to being as nice of a rifle.

Now, if TechSights would only make a version for the Thompson!

Freedomv
February 11, 2008, 11:24 AM
To get the most bang for your buck over the long run I would hit the gun shops and anywhere else that you could pick up the rifle and get the feel of it.

Shoulder the rifle and ask yourself: Does it fit? Does it feel “Right”? How does it handle? Does it feel “Balanced” in your hands and to your shoulder? Is the stock to short or too long? Is it barrel heavy? Too long? Too short? Just right?
What about sights. Iron, leaf or peep? Scope can you use it without straining yourself to get a shot off?
For me some rifles just plain fit, while others just don’t feel like they belong in your hands. Try to avoid thinking “I can live with that” if there is something not quite right about the rifle.

If you buy the right “one” you will keep it forever and enjoy it. If it cost a little or a lot more it will be money well invested.

Other opinions may and will vary.
Vern

jsimmons
February 12, 2008, 09:01 AM
Here are my recommendations:

1) Semi-auto: Thompson/Center R-55 Classic
2) Bolt-action: CZ-452 (any model)
3) Lever-action: Henry Frontier (Model H001T)

markmc753
February 12, 2008, 09:13 AM
My favorite amongst my 22's is a Marlin 81t - bolt action, tube fed, shoots LR's, L's and shorts

spiroxlii
February 12, 2008, 11:46 AM
Ruger 10/22 - Common, popular, reliable
Marlin 60 - Less common, but popular, inexpensive, more accurate than 10/22 in stock form
Any CZ bolt action - Well made, more expensive than the two suggested above (but still affordable), popular, very very accurate

apocryph
February 12, 2008, 12:05 PM
You really need to shoulder a few to see how they feel. Assuming all rifles fit you equally well:

I have a 10/22 16" carbine and love it. In the stock configuration is was a tack driver, then I MallNinja'd it with a Krinkov conversion kit and a couple of milled aluminum hi-cap mags, and now it's a bit less accurate but fun as hell.

I also have a Ceiner kit for my AR-15. I know you asked about .22 LR rifles specifically, but if you want to spend several hundred more and get both a nice semi-auto .22 plinker for now and a scary black terrorist rifle for later, you might consider that.

Most recently I picked up a Marlin 39A levergun at a funshow. I wanted something that would reliably feed CB short and CB long cartridges, and my 10/22 definitely would not. I've handled .22 lever actions before, but the 39A is a thing of beauty. It's an absolute pleasure to shoot.

If you think you might ever want to do any surreptitious shooting, like perhaps without the neighbors knowing (within the bounds of the law, of course!), get a gun that can feed short and long in addition to long rifle. In my experience, that rules out all semi-autos, and anything with a box magazine.

Cron
February 12, 2008, 12:21 PM
Accurate, reliable, durable, handsome. This one is about 25 years old:

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g92/RonJ_2006/Range006.jpg



Ron

Cron
February 12, 2008, 07:32 PM
Apocryph,
The Remington semi-auto in the above post can shoot all three .22, L, S & LR.

spiroxlii
February 12, 2008, 07:50 PM
Cron, plenty of mag-fed .22 rifles can fire shorts if you load them one at a time, but they won't load them properly out of a magazine.

Will that Remington feed shorts from its tube magazine?

sm
February 12, 2008, 08:48 PM
I have a soft spot for old single shot rifles.

You know the ones, the one's in a gun store, pawn shop, classified in the paper and just need a good home and someone to give them attention to, and them back.
Sorta like a faithful dawg, .

I am this way about seeing a old Steven's Favorite, Win 61, Win 52, Rem 514...just any old Wood-n-Blue, be it single shot, pump, lever, or semi.

Take an Old Rem Fieldmaster, or Speedmaster, good looking guns! Feel good in the hands and take S, L, or LR

Lever action Browning is just sweeeet!

Ain't nuttin' Sexier than a Browning Automatic .22 - nuttin'! *wink*
I mean you gotta take that old gal home with you...gotta!

New guns, I am partial to the Marlin 60, and that kids sized Marlin too.

Cron
February 12, 2008, 09:13 PM
Spiroxlii,
Yep, that's one of the 552's claims to fame. It'll feed, fire and eject all three. See Remingtons website. Maybe that's why the 552 has been in production for 51 years.

MaterDei
February 12, 2008, 09:21 PM
10/22 or Marlin 60. Either is AWESOME! Enjoy.

TCB in TN
February 12, 2008, 09:26 PM
Well I will say that there is a lot I agree with above, if you really want a cheap, accurate, semi plinker then get a good used marlin 60. If it doesn't feed right then take it apart and clean it and it will!

If you want a plinker NOW, but may want to upgrade later get a 10/22. I have had many and set scopes for folks on many more, and right out of the box they are NOT typically as accurate as the Marlin, but OH BOY can you trick them out! I currently still own 1 in its original configuration but have plans to mod it just a little but I have at least a half dozen marlins.

As for levers well after having shot the Henry, owned Win 9422's, and 150's, Browning BL22's, and owned the Marlin 39 and I would say that the 39 is the top of the group!

Bolt rifles will really depend just on your preference. I have shot everything from the Marlin 25, to the Ruger 77/22, Anshutz, the old russian trainers, etc. and in my experience most bolt folks are real picky about which they like. Now me, I like them all, and really if I had the money I would have one of each!

Seven©
February 12, 2008, 09:32 PM
10/22

Can't beat the price. Tougher than woodpecker lips. And tons of accessories if you want to "tinker" with it.

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