Are there any guns you can't pronounce?


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Tribal
February 16, 2008, 10:56 PM
Are there any guns that you have trouble pronouncing, either because they're in some complicated foreign language or because they're "too simple" ?

For instance, I have no idea how to pronounce "FAL." Is it "F-A-L" or "Fahl" (or "fail")?

I pronounce Mateba as "muh tayba," but I've heard "muh teeba" and "mah-te-bah" before.

Similarly, for Heckler & Koch, do you say "HK" or "H&K" ?

I know this is kind of a silly post, but discovering that .454 Casull is pronounced like "kuh-sool" and not "castle" got me thinking.

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RNB65
February 16, 2008, 10:59 PM
I have no earthly clue how to pronounce Česká Zbrojovka (none, zip, nada). But I sure do like their toys.
:)

igpoobah
February 16, 2008, 11:08 PM
I say FAL, which rhymes with PAL. Who knows.

ColinthePilot
February 16, 2008, 11:10 PM
Similarly, for Heckler & Koch, do you say "HK" or "H&K" ?


Is it kotch, coke, coach?

Kalishnikov VS KalAshnikov?

RNB65
February 16, 2008, 11:12 PM
I pronounce it as one word FAL (rhymes with pal).

But when the military channel did their "10 best combat rifles" show, they always referred to it by the letters F - A - L.

Got me...

JWarren
February 16, 2008, 11:13 PM
I have no trouble pronouncing ANY gun names. If I don't know one, I'll make it up. As long as I look like I know what I am talking about, you'll second-guess yourself if you pronounce it otherwise. After all, you are probably doing the exact same thing. :)


All kidding aside, I do try to find the correct pronunciation.

But there are some things I just ain't gonna do. I don't like trying to make words out of the letters of a rifle name such as:

FAL is F-A-L to me, not Fal.

WASR is a W-A-S-R, not a Wasr

CETME is a C-E-T-M-E, not a Cetme.

After all, I don't think ANYONE (I hope) says that an AR-15 is an Arh-15 or a AK-47 is an Aak-47.

To me, same thing, same rules.


-- John

Tribal
February 16, 2008, 11:19 PM
Well, "arrgh-fifteen" would sound a bit piratey for most of us. I'm okay with acronyms which sorta-kinda look like words (CETME = "set me" and WASR "wasser"), but "FAL" seems to be in the gray zone.

As for Koch, I've always heard it to rhyme with "notch," although I'd guess the Germans rhyme it with "spoke."

Maybe when someone asks what we have we ought to just hand it to them and say "Here, see for yourself!"

Rembrandt
February 16, 2008, 11:25 PM
I have my version, but I've heard Garand pronounced several ways .......

"Gear-and"
"Gay-rand"
"Gaar-rand"

Thain
February 16, 2008, 11:25 PM
Carbine, I alway say "car-bean" (rhymes with "seen") but I've heard "car-bine" (ryhmes with "nine").

I'd really like to know which is correct. "FAL" or "Eff-Aye-El" is something that, I think, people will overlook. But I feel like if I've been saying carbine wrong, I might as well be asking to look at the dealer's "pees-tolls" and "riflés"

yhtomit
February 16, 2008, 11:30 PM
It only took a few posts for car-bean vs. car-byne to appear ;)

On that one, I'll take the position that they're morally equal, but I find it easier and more pleasant-sounding to say "car-bean." (That is, the same way Thain says.)

timothy

bensdad
February 16, 2008, 11:32 PM
Franchi: [fran-chi] or [fraun-key]
Baikal: [Bi-cal] or [Bay-cal]
Sakko: [Sock-oh] or [Say-ko]
Aya: [A-Y-A] or [Aya, like hey-ya]
clip: [magazine] or [mag]
carbine: [car-bean] or [car-bine, like pine]

Except for the stupid "clip" joke, the only one of these I think I know is Sakko. I read in a gun rag that it's "sock-oh."

American_Pit_Bull
February 16, 2008, 11:34 PM
Is it kotch, coke, coach?It is pronounced like the soft drink... "coke"

And I say "HK"

Green Lantern
February 16, 2008, 11:37 PM
Still not sure I pronounce "Mosin Nagant" correct...I've always called it a MOE-zin nuh-GANT... :confused:

On other guns mentioned:

I always pronounced 'Koch' as "cotch" - d'oh...

Garand as GUH-rand.

Carbine as "car-bine, like pine"

How about the SPAS-12? Is it S-P-A-S, or "spass" as I pronouce it?

Floppy_D
February 16, 2008, 11:40 PM
I always said "H and K," because I feel inclined to pronounce Koch as "Cock," and I can't say that without chuckling. I say "Wazzer" and "Set-me" just because the military habit is to make a word out of every single acronym. (i.e. CSOOW is "sea-sow").

JWarren
February 16, 2008, 11:43 PM
Still not sure I pronounce "Mosin Nagant" correct


According to 7.62x54R.net, it is pronounced:

"Mo-sun Nay-gon"



-- John

brigadier
February 16, 2008, 11:44 PM
A few months ago, I posted an audio feed (in video form) on weaponvideos.org that includes correct pronunciation of a few names you guys brought up. Here it is:

http://www.weaponvideos.org/viewvideo/266/Odd_and_misspronounced_gun_names_pronounced__1_/

Probably the biggest error here is that "Koch" in this case is a German name, and in German, "ch" makes a sound like someone who is getting ready to spit. Since this sound does not exist in the English language, the substitute is the "k" sound. In addition, the "O" in German makes the sound that the capitol "O" makes in English. The actual English pronunciation for Koch is: kOk (exact way we say the word: "Coke")

Other things to remember in names from those languages:

The "r" sometimes makes a hard "th" or "d" sound. In this case, the "r" is often used as an English substitute for a letter in the Russian alphabet that looks sort of like a cross between a backward capitol "R" and a capitol "A"

The "J" in most Slavic/east European Languages makes the same sound the "y" makes in English.

The "s" in most east european languages makes the same sound as "sh" makes in English.

The "a" makes the "o" sound in these languages.

In some of these languages, the "W" sometimes makes the "v" sound.

Further examples of these sounds being used:

Janos is pronounced: yon-Osh

Wallachia is pronounced: vol-o-kE-o

Hunedoara is pronounced: hUn-e-dOor-o

rust collector
February 16, 2008, 11:55 PM
Sigh... Obssessive compulsive computer strikes again

rust collector
February 16, 2008, 11:57 PM
I love waiting forever to find out the post went in 3 times

nainc
February 17, 2008, 12:00 AM
Called up HK once for a question on my USP. They answered the phone, "Heckler and Coke". Made me thirsty.

rust collector
February 17, 2008, 12:01 AM
FAL is an acronym that is short enough to say each letter, F, A, L.
Sako is indeed socko
Franchi is Fronky
Mosin Nagant is moZEEN naGON
Correia knows what to call H und K and will be glad to tell you
Baikal is byKOLL
AyA is Spanish for two names beginning with A, so may be Ah ee Ah
and John Garand called himself GArund
Carbine is KARbeen in these parts
and Walther is Walter by any other name
CZ is KESka zbroyOVka and
Makarov is maKOrov
Tikka is TEEka

Now, will someone tell me how to pronounce Fazakerly?

brigadier
February 17, 2008, 12:18 AM
For instance, I have no idea how to pronounce "FAL." Is it "F-A-L" or "Fahl" (or "fail")?

If it's a FN given name and not an abbreviation, then it's "fol"

CZ is KESka zbroyOVka and
Makarov is maKOrov

Keska is actually pronounced: "kesh-ko

Makarov is pronounced: mo-kor-Ov (note that the "mo-k" is usually said the way we say "MaC" in "MaCdonalds."

Tigerseye
February 17, 2008, 12:20 AM
Budischowsky

brigadier
February 17, 2008, 12:28 AM
Budischowsky

What language? If that's German or Slavic, then it's: bUd-Esh-ghOv-shkE or something very close to that.

Leif Runenritzer
February 17, 2008, 12:32 AM
Koch rhymes with loch. Otherwise, it's orthodox (IMO) to say cock. Doing it any other way is but a childish attempt to avoid a seemingly dirty word. My German dictionary transliterates it as /kɔx/; that's a short vowel there.

Č = engl. Ch as in Chip
á = engl. A as in Father
j = engl. Y as in Yellow

Saiga = not Sega
Barnaul = barn owl (IMO)
Walther = Valter (IMHO)
Makarov = maKARaf

With a name like mine, let me tell you:
Spelling is based on pronunciation, not the other way around. If it's not English, the rules you know don't necessarily apply. Exceptions to this are acronym-based words like laser, and of course, FAL.

TexasBen317
February 17, 2008, 12:37 AM
ok, got one for ya.. Makarov is it Kack a bov? Mark a boy?

I know it is Russia,, but I don't know anyone who speaks Russian..

Thanks.

kd7nqb
February 17, 2008, 12:38 AM
I would like to say that a text forum is the WORST place to discuss pronunciation. Anyway I regularly pronounce makarov Mark-off. Now that I realize how its spell I feel dumb.

Javelin
February 17, 2008, 12:39 AM
Siaga... I have heard this pronounced two ways by at least 50 different individuals. Here are the two ways I have heard it pronounced

*Sigh-eh-gah

OR

*Say-gah

I pronounce it Sigh-eh-gah. But I could be wrong with the other 50% of America.

:)

sandy4570
February 17, 2008, 12:41 AM
Mauser Verguiero , heck , I can not even spell the darn name :)
Mannichler schonuer -that Greek rifle that shoot 6.5 X 45 mm I call it Man-ni-er -schnow -er ??

Leif Runenritzer
February 17, 2008, 12:58 AM
Mauser Verguiero , heck , I can not even spell the darn name
Mannichler schonuer -that Greek rifle that shoot 6.5 X 45 mm I call it Man-ni-er -schnow -er ??

It's vergueiro, so ver-gay-ro. In the word mannlicher, the Ch is like an H-sound, but behind one's teeth instead of at the throat. A K-sound can substitute. The stress is on the mann-part of the word. Schoenauer, or Schönauer uses that french Eu-sound where the Oe is. It's acceptable to substitute an Ay-sound for this, as in Matt Groening or the old lyric "Danke Schoen". The -auer part sounds like hour.

Tribal
February 17, 2008, 01:15 AM
This always comes to bite me when I call up gun dealers.

Me: "So do you have any Kahrs in stock?"
Them: "Uhhh...what?"
Me: "Kahr pistols."
Them: "I don't know about that. All our pistols will fit there"

Me: "Do you sells H&Ks?"
Them: "HNK? Never heard of 'em."
Me: "You know, Hecker and...whatever."

Where I'm from:
carbine = car-byne
Mosin Nagant = mohsin nay-gant
Saiga = Say-guh (like the old video game system)
Makarov = mack-uh-rov

41magsnub
February 17, 2008, 01:22 AM
BAR or B A R ?

Seriously.. which is it?

Slugless
February 17, 2008, 01:29 AM
Daewoo = Dae-yeu, not day-woo

FourNineFoxtrot
February 17, 2008, 01:33 AM
This is an interesting thread, as I've often wondered about pronunciation for some of these.

That said, I've already decided how to say most of them on my own, and the people I talk to and shoot with say them the same way.

Heckler & Koch is a notable one. I've stumbled over it more than once. "Coach", "Cotch", "Ko-chghhh" (usually either sounds like a cough or makes me cough), et cetera. I'd more or less settled on "Coach", so I'm unlikely to change over to "Coke" or "Cock", especially since I would just get a funny look in conversation (particularly on the latter option). If I said to my friend, "I want to buy a Heckler & "Cock" USP", he's gonna laugh in my face for probably the whole 30 seconds it will take me to explain.

As much as I may prefer to pronounce these words correctly, sometimes the original correct way just isn't the best option in our language. I've heard so many people speak English with different accents, and all of them have something they can't pronounce quite right... I don't feel too bad about pronouncing a word wrong here and there in other languages.

Here's a few more, and how I pronounce them (right or wrong):

Mosin-Nagant: "Moe-zin Nuh-gant" (Like H&K, changing would just confuse people)

CZ: I won't even attempt to pronounce (or even spell, unaided) the full words. "See-Zee" does for me.

Kalashnikov: I go either way on this one, probably favoring "Kal-ish-nuh-kov"

Acronyms: I'll pronounce 'em as words if I see a word to pronounce, even one lacking vowels. WASR = Wasser, CETME = Set-me. One-syllable word acronyms, however, I'll pronounce the letters. A-R, A-K, F-A-L, B-A-R etc.

Carbine: I used to say "Car-bine", like "wine". When I heard other people say it, though, it was almost always "Car-bean". So I switched to "Car-bean", and tend to favor it.

Mauser: "Mow-zer", with mow rhyming with cow.

Walther: "Wall-thur"

Garand: "Gare-und", gare rhyiming with care. Sometimes I'll also say "Guh-rand"

Makarov: "Mack-a-rov"

Anteater1717
February 17, 2008, 01:39 AM
I don't know how to pronounce
Mosin Nagant, because I've heard so many varations on how to say it.
Volquartsen and Saiga, I have no idea how to say them either.

jackmead
February 17, 2008, 01:39 AM
I'm not sure on how to pronounce Koch in Heckler & Koch.
Is it coke or is it closer to mayor Koch? :confused:

PeteRR
February 17, 2008, 01:44 AM
Winchester


Don't look at me like I'm crazy...

DoubleTapDrew
February 17, 2008, 01:50 AM
Is it kotch, coke, coach?

Kalishnikov VS KalAshnikov?
I read an article that dealt with the H&K pronunciation and said it's pronounced like "coke". To get true german pronunciation you may need to bring up some flem.
With AKs I've always said "kalishnakov" until last week I saw Clint Smith and a couple TV programs saying KalAshnakov.
How about sturmgewehr? :) ssshturm-geh-weer (or veer)?
Steyr (steer or steyer) A-U-G?

Brian Dale
February 17, 2008, 01:53 AM
I say Guh-RAND for the rifle, but a gentleman once posted here that John C. Garand had personally told him that he pronounced his name GAIR-unt, just as Rust Collector and FourNineFoxtrot wrote.

I say CAR-bean for the weapon and CAR-byne for Mr. Williams.

I pronounce Saiga to rhyme with taiga (boreal forest), which I've heard pronounced by a lot of biologists over the years. SY-guh.

I refer to Heckler & Koch as H und K (Aitch OONT Kay). :evil:

And to the OP: Why no, there aren't any gun names that I can't pronounce. Every so often, I find out that I've been pronouncing one of them wrong for years, but hey...

PeteRR
February 17, 2008, 01:55 AM
Koch in High German is more like "Ko-chghhh". The Germans down Munich-way use a soft "ch" sound, so it's more like "kosh".

Leif Runenritzer
February 17, 2008, 03:04 AM
Heckler and *cough*
:D

Leif Runenritzer
February 17, 2008, 03:14 AM
Steyr (steer or steyer) A-U-G?

I've been saying shtīr" oug' and stīr" oug'. I'm pretty sure you're right about the AUG part.

Superlite27
February 17, 2008, 03:28 AM
FN (Fabrique National de Herstal) FAL (Fusil Automatique Léger)

FN FAL is an acronym, therefore is pronounced by saying the letters.

ef-en ef-aye-el.....unless someone really wants to pronounce the whole thing. Proof of this can be explained by a simple name. If a person's name was Frank Allen Lindberg his initials would be ef-aye-el. You wouldn't call the guy "FAL" would you?


Same with H&K. It's either aich and kay, or aich kay. Unless someone wants to pronounce Heckler and........whatever. You wouldn't say "Huckkkkkk!" would you?

Warren
February 17, 2008, 03:37 AM
So is it Gahlock or Gulock?

MaterDei
February 17, 2008, 03:46 AM
BAR or B A R ?

Seriously.. which is it?

I'm pretty sure it's B A R.

FN FAL is an acronym, therefore is pronounced by saying the letters.

I agree that FN FAL is pronounced by saying the letters but acronyms are not always pronounced that way. For example, everybody says Hum-V, and not HWWMV. Many say that the word 'posh' originally stood for 'port out starboard home' and that it was so frequently said as a word that it actually became a word. :)

SCUBA, LASER, and NATO are also pronounced as words and not initials.

Superlite27
February 17, 2008, 04:00 AM
acronyms are not always pronounced that way.

I agree. I am one of the few people who have studied word origins.

For example: Manure used to be transported by boat on wooden palates. To keep the keels of boats from rotting, the words "Ship High In Transit" used to be written upon it. This eventually became shortened to an acronym. This acronym evolved into a pronunciation. This pronunciation of the acronym "Ship High In Transit" eventually became (literally) a dirty word.

So, yes. I agree that acronyms are able to be pronounced as actual words. FN FAL is a prime example of an acronym that (even though incorrect) may still evolve into a pronunciation.

Warren
February 17, 2008, 04:02 AM
Finafal?

FN FAL is a prime example of an acronym that (even though incorrect) may still evolve into a pronunciation.

phaed
February 17, 2008, 04:23 AM
galil

Donut
February 17, 2008, 04:40 AM
Not a gun, but:

"Trijicon"

230RN
February 17, 2008, 04:40 AM
How about Nineteeneleven? Is that ninee-teh-ehnn-e-lee-ven, or what?

I posted this scan of a page from Hatcher's Notebook quite a while ago. Note caption.

ETA:
Sorry, I guess a lot of folks are having trouble uploading images, but the caption reads:

John C. Garand, designer of the U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30 M1. He pronounces his name "Garand" (phonetic symbols} with the G hard as in go, and the stress on the first syllable, to rhyme with parent.

MikePGS
February 17, 2008, 05:19 AM
For saiga my limited russian makes me think it would be pronounced Sa e(pronounced just like saying the letter) ga, but i pronounce it as sega in order to avoid confusion.

wheelgunslinger
February 17, 2008, 07:49 AM
CZ forum usually has one or two people axing about the correct pronunciation of Ceska Zbrojovka

Armoredman posted this (http://czechpistols82792.yuku.com/topic/15747) "Chess-ka jbro-hov-ka is they way I was taught. A Czeck shooter at the range said that was close enough for an American.
Dave"

There was also a link to a sound bite where you could hear it being said... but I can't find it.

I often wonder about how to pronounce the Turkish variant of the CZ "Sarsilmaz." Another Turkish tongue bender.

PercyShelley
February 17, 2008, 08:54 AM
Does anyone know how to pronounce "Degtyarev"?

It doesn't come up much, true, but I have utterly no idea.

brigadier
February 17, 2008, 09:13 AM
CZ forum usually has one or two people axing about the correct pronunciation of Ceska Zbrojovka

Armoredman posted this "Chess-ka jbro-hov-ka is they way I was taught. A Czeck shooter at the range said that was close enough for an American.
Dave"

There was also a link to a sound bite where you could hear it being said... but I can't find it.

I posted a link I made a while ago that contained the pronunciation for Ceska Zborojovka among other names but I since deleted and replaced it with the one below (second time posting it on this thread.

http://www.weaponvideos.org/viewvideo/266/Odd_and_misspronounced_gun_names_pronounced__1_/

I hang out with people from that part of the world all the time so I have grown accustomed to the way these people pronounce these names not to mention having looked them up to be sure, so I not only used the correct pronunciation, but in many cases (though not with CZ) I even used the way of saying it you'll usually hear, such as with Tokarev and Makarov, which you get to the point of doing naturally when 80% of your local gun buddies first language is the one/s that these names come from. LOL.

BTW. I am expecting to see some Ukrainian friends today (who actually use to live near the factory where the Veprs are made) and one of which was a Red Army draftee during Afghanistan, and I will ask them how to pronounce Mateba as I myself am not entirely positive.

I often wonder about how to pronounce the Turkish variant of the CZ "Sarsilmaz." Another Turkish tongue bender.

Hmm. As far as I can tell, at least when using English characters, Turkish names are pronounced with mostly Slavic sounds. For instance, Istanbul is pronounced: Es-ton-bUl as pronounced by this Istanbul resident in this video:
http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&videoID=2028538927

That be the case, if we are pronouncing it as spelled, then Sarsilmaz is pronounced: sors-El-moz

joffe
February 17, 2008, 09:36 AM
Well, I may stumble on many of the others, but at least I can pronounce Raufoss, Krag-Jřrgensen and Kongsberg. :o

m_733
February 17, 2008, 09:41 AM
hey superlite27, The use of S.H.I.T. as an acronym is a fabrication, see:
http://www.etymonline.com/baloney.php
I hope you can let the other people in your selective group of "word origin" studiers in on this.

crankshop1000
February 17, 2008, 10:07 AM
I've always mispronounced "Colt".

Rembrandt
February 17, 2008, 10:26 AM
There are several different pronunciations for "Jennings"....

~!@#$%^&*(.........and.......(*&^%$#@!~

johnnytang24
February 17, 2008, 10:54 AM
How do you say 'Feinwerkbau'? FWB?

brigadier
February 17, 2008, 10:55 AM
There are several different pronunciations for "Jennings"....

~!@#$%^&*(.........and.......(*&^%$#@!~

Here's another one:

sEn-gl shot ot-O-ma-tic

Cannonball888
February 17, 2008, 11:07 AM
Koch in High German is more like "Ko-chghhh". The Germans down Munich-way use a soft "ch" sound, so it's more like "kosh"
Du hast recht, mein Herr.

I've been saying shtīr' oug" and stīr' oug". I'm pretty sure you're right about the AUG part
shtīr' owg is correct. AUG is not an abbreviation but the german word (German is the language in Austria) for eye which is probably something to do with the guns integral scope.


Mosin Nagant = mohsin nay-gant
Almost. Just drop the t sound in Nagant. It's "MOHsin Nay-GAHN"


Does anyone know how to pronounce "Degtyarev"?
My wife says it's close as americans can prounounce deg-tya-ROV



PPSh is an abbreviation. My wife tells me the russian letters are prounounced pe-pe sha (like the hispanic Pepe and the shah of Iran)

Limeyfellow
February 17, 2008, 11:34 AM
I have my version, but I've heard Garand pronounced several ways .......

"Gear-and"
"Gay-rand"
"Gaar-rand"

What strange about that is they couldn't even figure that out in the military during WW2. My uncle in law who was in the US Marines in the Pacific was told be his superiors it was called the Gear-and, while the other uncle who was in the Marines during the Korean War was told it was called the Gaar-rand as was his brother who was in the European theatre. My father in law in the US Navy based in the Phillipines got told both.

Tribal
February 17, 2008, 12:23 PM
I'd really like to know which is correct. "FAL" or "Eff-Aye-El" is something that, I think, people will overlook. But I feel like if I've been saying carbine wrong, I might as well be asking to look at the dealer's "pees-tolls" and "riflés"

This cracked me up. "Soldier, pick up your riflé and get back in the fight!"

Tim the Enchanter
February 17, 2008, 01:31 PM
AUG is not an abbreviation but the german word (German is the language in Austria) for eye which is probably something to do with the guns integral scope.

German major chiming in,
AUG= Armee Universal Gehwehr or Army universal rifle.
Koch rhymes with Loch, if you pronounce it like the Scots do in Loch Ness.

Leif Runenritzer
February 17, 2008, 02:27 PM
How do you say 'Feinwerkbau'?

fīn'verkˇbou"
ˈfaın.vɛrkˌbaʊ

FWB?

The German names of the letters are:

ef vā bā
ɛf veː beː

but i'd rather say ɛf ˈdʌbəl.juː biː.

"Gay-rand"

That must be what the Germans called it.

Cannonball888
February 17, 2008, 03:48 PM
German major chiming in,
AUG= Armee Universal Gehwehr or Army universal rifle.
Well, I bow to your knowledge since you were a major in the German Army. :D

Sergeant Sabre
February 17, 2008, 04:10 PM
Try to pronounce "DSHK"

Brian Dale
February 17, 2008, 05:35 PM
Welcome, Tim the Enchanter. I've always liked the bazooka thing that you did with your staff that time. :)

Ash
February 17, 2008, 05:49 PM
What amuses me is how concerned we are about pronunciation of foreign firearm words, yet the Germans, Belgians, French, Czechs, and Russians pronounce foreign firearms in their own way, too. The French aren't worried about pronouncing CZ in the appropriately Czech way, and the Russian's aren't worried about pronouncing Ruger while the Germans don't seem overly concerned with how they say Savage.

Ash

Rembrandt
February 17, 2008, 06:09 PM
(Most worthless gun ever made, French) Pronounced....."show-show", just don't know how to spell it.

Ash
February 17, 2008, 06:23 PM
Chauchat

Ash

White Horseradish
February 17, 2008, 06:29 PM
You guys are making it too complicated. :neener:

All the Russian stuff is pronounced exactly how it is spelled, since it is a transliteration anyway. All the A's are as in cart, all the I's are as in fish, all the O's are as in pot, every time. Final V of a word is often pronounced as F in everyday speech.

Therefore,

sai-GAh, sai the same as the Japanese pointy thing

ka-LASH-ni-kof

ma-KA-rof

MO-sin

DEG-tya-ref

Nagant, being a French name, is different. T is silent, and it is na-GAN, (like gun).


And Chauchat is not show-show, it's more like show-SHAH.

Conqueror
February 17, 2008, 06:29 PM
I agree. I am one of the few people who have studied word origins.

For example: Manure used to be transported by boat on wooden palates. To keep the keels of boats from rotting, the words "Ship High In Transit" used to be written upon it. This eventually became shortened to an acronym. This acronym evolved into a pronunciation. This pronunciation of the acronym "Ship High In Transit" eventually became (literally) a dirty word.

So, yes. I agree that acronyms are able to be pronounced as actual words. FN FAL is a prime example of an acronym that (even though incorrect) may still evolve into a pronunciation.

lol, no offense but you should probably start studying harder:
http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl-s-word.htm

wuluf
February 17, 2008, 06:34 PM
This is why I buy American:
Colt
Kimber
Springfield

i know how to pronounce 'em already! :neener:

I do own a Taurus, but that's almost english too...

Ash
February 17, 2008, 06:43 PM
Ah, everybody knows Nagant was a Belgian!

Ash

jpsimms
February 17, 2008, 07:01 PM
jimenez = crap

sandy4570
February 23, 2008, 04:25 AM
It's vergueiro, so ver-gay-ro. In the word mannlicher, the Ch is like an H-sound, but behind one's teeth instead of at the throat. A K-sound can substitute. The stress is on the mann-part of the word. Schoenauer, or Schönauer uses that french Eu-sound where the Oe is. It's acceptable to substitute an Ay-sound for this, as in Matt Groening or the old lyric "Danke Schoen". The -auer part sounds like hour.

Thanks for the info. Mannlicher Schoenauer is one and only 6.5 MM rifle I have I prefer it over much better condition (some even in mint and lower price ) Swedish Mauser because the Greek rifle saw plenty of combat so now I can properly call the name and tell folks at the range.:):)

22-rimfire
February 23, 2008, 09:30 AM
Ever try to pronounce CZ? cizzzzz, kind of like fizz except with an F. I wonder how many gun shops have had people come in asking for a cizzzzz?

Guitargod1985
February 23, 2008, 12:57 PM
What about Mannlicher? It just seems wrong to have to say "man licker." No matter what accent you try to use to spin the pronunciation, it still sounds weird.

Cannonball888
February 23, 2008, 07:53 PM
Saiga.
I thought it was SAY-gah but my ex-soviet wife read the name on the owners manual which is written in Cyrillic and she says it's sigh-GAH

PercyShelley
February 23, 2008, 08:13 PM
I thought it was SAY-gah but my ex-soviet wife read the name on the owners manual which is written in Cyrillic and she says it's sigh-GAH

Yep, just like the antelope it's named after.

Bazooka Joe71
February 23, 2008, 08:32 PM
Sorry if I just looked past it when reading the others, but do you say "aycawg" or "A-C-O-G?"

The Saiga one always had me curious too, I always said it like as in genesis.

Leif Runenritzer
February 24, 2008, 12:29 AM
What amuses me is how concerned we are about pronunciation of foreign firearm words, yet the Germans, Belgians, French, Czechs, and Russians pronounce foreign firearms in their own way, too. The French aren't worried about pronouncing CZ in the appropriately Czech way, and the Russian's aren't worried about pronouncing Ruger while the Germans don't seem overly concerned with how they say Savage.

Being that English spelling is outmoded by 500 years and was flawed from the start, we are at a disadvantage when confronted with another spelling system, no matter how simple it is. The reverse can be true, but English is known world-wide, so outlanders have a good idea of what to expect from our spellings. Although a German might say Sevidge rather than Savage, that's far from how the arrangement of letters would be pronounced as a German word. I don't know, maybe a German would pronounce Savage like a French word. There goes half my argument.

What about Mannlicher? It just seems wrong to have to say "man licker." No matter what accent you try to use to spin the pronunciation, it still sounds weird.

I can think of two ways to help this. One, in some German accents, Ch (when preceded by Ä, E, I, Ö, Ü, Y or a consonant) is pronounced as a Sh-sound; so manlisher. Two, the A (like in man) can instead be pronounced as the A in father. In German, it's actually a shorter, slightly different Ah-sound, but if you speak English only, this sound is not readily available. IMO, the A-sound of was is much closer, but that strikes me as unorthodox. The Spanish-language A-sound is right-on if you can utter it.

sai-GAh, sai the same as the Japanese pointy thingSaiga.
I thought it was SAY-gah but my ex-soviet wife read the name on the owners manual which is written in Cyrillic and she says it's sigh-GAH

So the last syllable is louder? Maybe i'll match it with the pitch of Saigon

Leif Runenritzer
February 25, 2008, 02:46 PM
It's vergueiro, so ver-gay-ro.
On second thought, being Portugese, it would be verˇgā'roo. However, i believe it's more natural for an English speaker to say vėrˇgâr'oo / vɚˈgɛəɹuː. And this way, the kids won't giggle at you. :) In Portugese, and many other tongues, their O-sound became an Oo-sound, but like English and Swedish, they went on spelling it with an O.

.cheese.
February 25, 2008, 02:53 PM
is it pronounced "Mah-zer" or "Mow-zer"?

also, is it "fahl" "falh" or "eff.. Ae..ell" ?

h0ss
February 25, 2008, 03:09 PM
Is it kotch, coke, coach?

Not sure about H&K, but i run a german made machine at my job which is spelled "Koch".

Everyone i work with pronounces it "Koh" with a long "O"

Sometimes I jokingly call it the kotch. :D

FireArmFan
February 25, 2008, 03:42 PM
I've always heard Sturmgewehr pronounced Sturm-Guh-Vare.

News Shooter
February 25, 2008, 03:47 PM
Biz-lee or Byes-lee?

Tribal
February 25, 2008, 05:21 PM
I kind of like compromising on the FN FAL, spelling out the company but saying the product. Hence:

Guy 1: "What's that you've got there?"
Guy 2: "It's a F'n FAL"
Guy 1: "No _____?"
And then it deteriorates from there.

keeperofthehills
February 25, 2008, 05:29 PM
"There are several different pronunciations for "Jennings"....

~!@#$%^&*(.........and.......(*&^%$#@!~"

yeah, saw a guy at the range almost loose an eye when that little red cocking indicator flew out the back of the slide when he was firing it.


The other day I was talking about collecting guns with my section boss.
I told him that i had a couple of Mosin-Nagants a K31 Schmidt-Rubin and a 30-40 Krag Jorgensen et cetera...

He looked me in the eye and said "dont you own any "normal" guns like a winchester or something... you know stuff thats easy to spell!" hahaha:)

OregonJohnny
February 25, 2008, 05:46 PM
I've heard HK employees say, "coke". But it seems that one has already been resolved.

I have an old JC Higgins .30-06 bolt-action rifle with a Swedish made Husqvarna action. When I was in college, I dated a girl who was born and raised in Sweden. When I said this word, she laughed. I pronounced it "Husk-varna". I guess it's more like "hoos-ka-verna".

I pronounce Hornady "horn-a-dee", but I just heard my friend the other day say "horn-a-day". I kept my mouth shut, in case I was wrong. For Hoppes #9 solvent, I pronounce it, "hopps", but my dad says it's "hoppies".

CountGlockula
February 25, 2008, 06:05 PM
Steyr = Shh-s-tire

Brian Dale
February 25, 2008, 07:15 PM
OregonJohnny, there was a THR thread a couple of years ago in which the consensus was Hoppies. I'd been saying it the way you do.

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