Key Lanyard


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RancidSumo
February 19, 2008, 11:59 PM
I was thinking today about the lanyards that a lot of people (especially high school students) keep their keys on and their possible self defense applications. A ring of keys would most likely do considerable damage when swung from the end of 1-2 feet of rope (or whatever your particular one is made of). The only problem that I can see is that many of these may not be strong enough especially at the joint where they usually can unclip and may break/unclip after the first strike. Does anyone else see these as a great self defense tool? Anyone have one made specifically for this purpose?

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Skofnung
February 20, 2008, 12:17 AM
I've always seen most of those things as a liability. You've already given an attacker a noose around your neck unless it has a breakaway component.

You would need something other than keys at the end, as the energy transfer would be dampened due to the fact that the keys are not a solid mass.

If you put a solid weight at the end of a tether, you would have manufactured a "slungshot," a device that can land you in hot water (in Florida at least, due to archaic 19th century laws.)

If you had a solid mass, and didn't care about or were not constrained by stupid laws, then you would need to train with your improvised weapon... alot. Flexible weapons are tough (at least for me and others I know) to use. You are as likely to smash yourself in the head on a return stroke as your opponent.

Fire extinguishers and chairs are readily accessible and effective SD options to HS students. At least they were when I was in.

RancidSumo
February 20, 2008, 12:21 AM
All the chairs are attached to desks and all the fire extinguishers are locked up (not sure how that is going to do anybody any good.)

Skofnung
February 20, 2008, 12:32 AM
They lock up the fire extinguishers? Seriously? Things have changed in the 10 years since I was released from captivity.

I'd look into getting a big sharpie marker and some form of stickfighting or kubaton training.

RancidSumo
February 20, 2008, 12:48 AM
Not much of a chance for training around here.

JShirley
February 20, 2008, 01:12 AM
I have a length of braided 500 cord, with a loop on each end. Typically, I have a large surplus carabiner at one end, and a smaller, lighter carabiner with keys at the other end. This is actually practical on a daily basis, because I clip the large carabiner to a belt loop.

I specifically requested a training buddy of mine to make this for me before I was reactivated. I wanted a weapon with some standoff that I could take literally everywhere with me. This has gone through multiple airport security screenings without even a mention.

Fair disclosure: I trained extensively with weighted chain around the time my first marriage ended. Kusarifundo was part of my next belt test, and I would take my chain out in the woods every day after work, and practice on dead trees. It takes some time to get good with flexibles. If you take this time, though, you can find tools to defend yourself that are easy to carry everywhere (before I had this lanyard, I always wore a sturdy belt, and attached a heavy lock to my carryon bag when flying), and that can give you range over knives.

blindside
February 20, 2008, 10:47 AM
Not much of a chance for training around here.

Hi RancidSumo, I was contacted about this thread. Being a small town, your training options are quite limited.

I teach a Pekiti Tirsia Kali class out of Pineda's Kenpo, 9-10 on Tuesday and Thursdays, after the Kenpo class. PTK starts with use of impact or bladed weapon training and then translates over to empty hand. We don't do much with flexible weapons, but have played around with little pieces of it in our training. The nature of movement overlaps quite well with kenpo even if the method of curricullum transmission is very different, and all of the PTK students are also members of the Kenpo class.

There is also a "ninjutsu" class being taught out of the Expedition Island Pavilion, last I checked it was on Tues/Thurs as well, and as a result I know nothing about the instructor or what he teaches since it overlaps with my own regular training nights. Contact GR Park and Rec for more info.

Thats about it, I don't think anyone else in town is teaching regularly.

If you are interested in training or have any questions please email me.

~B

Joe Demko
February 20, 2008, 10:53 AM
Anybody able to link to a website or recommend an easily located book about braiding? There're a few things around here that would be improved with the addition of a braided leather or paracord lanyard, but there is a great, big, braiding-shaped hole in my education.

Skofnung
February 20, 2008, 12:51 PM
http://stormdrane.blogspot.com/

Stormdrane is the king of internet paracord crafts. It should translate over to leather.

RancidSumo
February 20, 2008, 06:35 PM
Hi RancidSumo, I was contacted about this thread. Being a small town, your training options are quite limited.

I teach a Pekiti Tirsia Kali class out of Pineda's Kenpo, 9-10 on Tuesday and Thursdays, after the Kenpo class. PTK starts with use of impact or bladed weapon training and then translates over to empty hand. We don't do much with flexible weapons, but have played around with little pieces of it in our training. The nature of movement overlaps quite well with kenpo even if the method of curricullum transmission is very different, and all of the PTK students are also members of the Kenpo class.

There is also a "ninjutsu" class being taught out of the Expedition Island Pavilion, last I checked it was on Tues/Thurs as well, and as a result I know nothing about the instructor or what he teaches since it overlaps with my own regular training nights. Contact GR Park and Rec for more info.

Thats about it, I don't think anyone else in town is teaching regularly.

If you are interested in training or have any questions please email me.

I have actually taken classes at Pineda's but quit a while ago. It is good training and great instructors but it just isn't my thing. I know that I should do it anyway but just don't really want to. I wasn't aware that anyone was teaching a weapon class up there (other then the occasional sword/staff stuff which is rather impractical for everday use. I wouldn't have to take the regular Kenpo class to take this class would I?

BTW, who is this? Jason? Lamont?

blindside
February 20, 2008, 08:57 PM
OMG, you've cracked my secret identity. :D I'm Lamont.

Jason is the other Pekiti instructor. We haven't really advertised the class. We've been keeping it pretty small and low key, but hopefully we'll try to expand the program in the near future.

You don't have to join the kenpo class to do the PTK class. Our main focus is single knife/ stick but double knife/stick is taught as a coordination tool and to train the symmetric use of the hands, this makes the translation to empty hands more natural. Come by if you are interested.

Lamont

RancidSumo
February 20, 2008, 09:10 PM
Thanks.

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