Smith and Wesson 32 wcf ctg


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crapshoot13
February 20, 2008, 06:46 PM
I have a nickel plated smith and wesson 32 wcf ctg. It has checkered walnut grips and is in very good condition. The last patent date is Dec. 29, 1914. It was my great-grandfathers. I was told he acquired the gun in the early twenties. There are numbers stamped in the butt of the gun. They are 107114. The numbers on the frame and cylinder match. They are 32055. Are the latter numbers the serial number? If so, could the first set of numbers be police department issue numbers? My family and I are curious about all of this. If anyone could help we would greatly appreciate it. Thanks!

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briansp82593
February 20, 2008, 07:37 PM
pics would be of great help
i believe i just bought the same one you have... does it look anything like this?
http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r27/beretta96/Image112-1.jpg
if it does, its a smith regulation police

Old Fuff
February 20, 2008, 09:48 PM
Nope....

The second revolver is a Regulation Police model chambered in .32 S&W Long.

The one in question is a .32 WCF (Winchester Center Fire) which is an entirely different cartridge. In this case it is a .32-20; 1905 Hand Ejector, 4th Change. It was also known as the .32-20 Military & Police model.

The 4th Change version was made between 1915 and 1940, within a serial number range running from 65,701 to 144,684. Your gun, #107,114 was likely made during the 1920's. The serial number was stamped on the butt, rear cylinder face, and on the bottom of the barrel above the ejector rod. an assembly number was stamped on the frame inside the yoke cutout, and on the yoke itself. The "yoke" is the part that the cylinder swings out on.

Any numbers other then the serial and assembly numbers were likely stamped on the revolver after it left the factory.

The patent dates at this time ended with: Dec. 29, 1914 (as you know) and this further identifies your revolver. Standard barrel lengths, measured from the cylinder face to the muzzle, were 4, 5 and 6 inches. Standard finishes were blue or nickel plate. Both round and square butt styles were made, but the round butt usually featured black hard-rubber stocks, where the square butt came with checkered walnut ones.

Since this gun has been handeled down through the family I suggest you get it "lettered." To do so you need a snapshot of the gun, a full description, and a check in the amount of $30.00 made out to Smith & Wesson. Thereafter their in-house historian, Roy G. Jinks, will research that particular gun by going back through the old records - which is not an easy task. Then you will receive an official letter from Smith & Weson, with a general overview of the model, followed with a full description of the gun when it left that factory, the date it was shipped, and to what dealer or distributor.

More complete information will be found at Smith & Wesson's website at: www.smith-wesson.com

whosgreg
May 27, 2008, 12:25 PM
Hi,

I have this revolver smith & wesson 32 wcf ctg with # 72003 stamped on cylinder and bottom of the hand grip.

Are there ammunitions available for this revolver? What is the estimate value of this revolver?

Any help would be appreciate.

Old Fuff
May 27, 2008, 12:55 PM
You apparently have an early S&W .32-20 1905 Hand Ejector, 4th change.

These were made from 1915 through 1940, within a serial number range running from 65,701 to 144,684. Heat treated cylinders were not introduced until serial #81,287 in September, 1919, and you should consider this when buying ammunition.

A number of ammunition companies make so-called "cowboy loads," which use lead bullets and reduced velocities and pressures. They're intended for use in compitition, but they are also a good choice in older revolvers that are in good condition.

Your revolver does not have a positive hammer block. If you carry or shoot it, load no more then 5 rounds, and rest the hammer on the empty chamber.

2mardiv
December 31, 2009, 07:48 PM
I have a .32 WCF CTG marked 6" square butt. #63773. Since the serial number falls below the range given above, I'm at a loss as to the model.

Old Fuff
December 31, 2009, 08:59 PM
You have a S&W .32-20 1905 Hand Ejector, 3rd. change, made between 1909 and 1915 - within a serial number range running from approximately 45,201 to 65,700.

Same advise as noted in the above post #5 applies.

The Bushmaster
December 31, 2009, 09:40 PM
How's yer typin' finger doin', Old Fuff?:D

2mardiv
December 31, 2009, 10:09 PM
Any recommendations on ammo? Beside the Cowboy loads. Modern 32-20?

Thanks for the information. Happy New Year Old Fuff!

Old Fuff
January 1, 2010, 01:32 AM
How's yer typin' finger doin', Old Fuff?

I expect it to establish a new record for slow any day now. In desperation I bought one of those computer programs where you talk, and the computer turns it into text. We shall see... :uhoh:

Cowboy loads

Are regular .32-20 (or whatever) cartridges loaded with lead bullets and reduced powder charges. They work fine in an early 1900's revolver where hotter loads might quickly do some serious harm.

mnrivrat
January 1, 2010, 02:26 AM
Just a quick note that the S&W letter has gone up to $50 . At least that is what I was charged this fall.

The Lone Haranguer
January 1, 2010, 10:26 AM
http://www.slickdawg.com/images/smilies/hijack.gif

In desperation I bought one of those computer programs where you talk, and the computer turns it into text. We shall see... :uhoh:

http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/trek3.jpg

"It's typing everything I'm saying! Stop it! STOP IT!"

Old Fuff
January 1, 2010, 10:53 AM
You can have the typewriter (computer, whatever). I want the.... well never mind... :uhoh: :D

Old Fuff
January 1, 2010, 10:58 AM
Just a quick note that the S&W letter has gone up to $50 . At least that is what I was charged this fall.

True, but if you value the information in special cases it's worth it. A lot of work is involved because most of the old records are still not on a computer database.

Colt, by the way charges twice that much, and sometimes more.

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