Is this our very own Correia? (sure sounds like it)


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10 Ring Tao
March 9, 2008, 12:51 AM
http://www.claytoncramer.com/gundefenseblog/2008_03_01_archive.html#4415088193806022414

From the February 27, 2008 New Bedford [Mass.] Standard Times:

ROCHESTER Brad Correia had just returned to his home on Mattapoisett Road from a trip to the White Mountains with his wife and two children about 10:30 p.m. Sunday when they heard a knock at the front door.

Mr. Correia, 45, was tucking his 7-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter into bed. His wife went downstairs to see who was at the door and found a young man standing outside asking for help. Before opening the door, she summoned her husband.

"Before I went downstairs, I tucked my .45 into the back of my pants," Mr. Correia said.

Mr. Correia opened the door and Steven Grover, 18, of New Bedford, reported that his car had broken down on the interstate.

Since the family had just driven home from out of state, they had no way of knowing that a manhunt for three suspects in a purse-snatching was in progress.

"I could see that he was in pretty rough shape," Mr. Correia said of the unexpected visitor. "His clothes were soaked, he was bleeding and he'd lost one sneaker in the mud when he broke through the ice. I thought that if he were my son, I'd want someone to help him, so I let him in."

Mr. Correia permitted the fugitive to use the house phone while providing him with hot tea, dry clothes and hot water to soak his chilled feet.

"He made some calls, but he couldn't get anyone to come and get him," Mr. Correia said. "He wanted to call a cab, but he had no money, so I said I would pay."

By then, however, Mr. Correia had grown suspicious of his visitor because his story kept changing as it went along, he said.

"It just didn't add up, so I called 911 and asked them if they were looking for anyone."

Based on the description provided by the police, Mr. Correia realized that his guest was a wanted man.

"When it dawned on him that I was talking to the police, he jumped out of his chair. That's when I pulled my gun. I told him to sit back down, that the police were on their way, and he did."

"I've had my permit since I was 18, and that's the first time I've ever pointed a gun at another human being. I hope I never have to do it again. I tried to be a nice guy, but he had nothing to lose at that point. He knew he was going to jail."

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SilentArmy
March 9, 2008, 12:56 AM
The Correia here is Larry from FBMG in Draper Utah. Good story though!

RLsnow
March 9, 2008, 09:14 AM
good story

Correia
March 9, 2008, 04:48 PM
Not me. First off, he was nice. Secondly, he was helpful. Both of which are impossibilites with my branch of Correias. Good story though. :)

But since he had a .45, I can only assume that we're related.

Travis McGee
March 9, 2008, 05:11 PM
Moral of the story: Don't mess with Correias!

Sans Authoritas
March 9, 2008, 05:28 PM
Aye, this man should never have let him in. Not at 10:30 PM, not in this day and age. If he needs a phone, toss him a portable.

-Sans Authoritas

hexidismal
March 9, 2008, 06:03 PM
Aye, this man should never have let him in. Not at 10:30 PM, not in this day and age. If he needs a phone, toss him a portable.

Well.. maybe. Not everything is about survival though. Sometimes to be a good person you have to stick your neck out. One time, about 13 years ago I would guess. So this was before everybody had a cell phone. I had a car break down waaaay out in the middle of nowhere, on a road with the occasional farm and NO traffic. It was horrible pouring rain and the sun was almost down. I had little choice but to walk down the nearest loooong driveway I could find to to ask for help. I was only 17 or so, but I was into working out alot more then.. and I looked pretty menacing, and I KNEW it. So, I finally find a door to knock on , and this tiny young woman comes to the door. She sees me, 6'1 and 230 pounds of muscle , long wet hair in my face, wearing the "grunge" clothes of the time. She was alone in the house (which I discovered later) Now, she probably "should" have slammed the door and started calling the police right then and there. She didn't though. I explained my situation, and she let me in to use her phone (not a portable, she only had one wired line in a kitchen). I used it, called a tow truck, thanked her very much and started back to my car to wait.
The point is, she did the nice and good thing, instead of doing the smart thing.. and it worked out fine. I've never forgotten it. It's probably somewhat because of having received that kind of kindness, that I have treated others the same way. Nobody should live in fear of doing the right thing. I figure If I wind up dying because I was fearlessly good, then I will have died well. Most importantly though... I don't expect to die, and neither did the man in question here.. he was not only good, but PREPARED.

Sans Authoritas
March 9, 2008, 06:09 PM
Hex,

I can see that reasoning. Especially in particular parts of the country, where respectable culture is not circling the drain. I don't live in one of those areas, sadly. I live near enough to know what it is, however.

Hospitality is a dying trait, but it's only died at the rate of the civilization of society. Hitchhiking used to be a particularly safe thing to do in the 60's. Today, the state of civil society has made it a crap shoot with your life.

The only hitchhikers I'd pick up these days are ones with shotguns or rifles, wearing blaze orange vests. Or maybe a really scruffy-looking backpacker with about 6 weeks' worth of beard. I could trust them.

-Sans Authoritas

Triphammer
March 9, 2008, 07:00 PM
quote
"The only hitchhikers I'd pick up these days are ones with shotguns or rifles, wearing blaze orange vests. Or maybe a really scruffy-looking backpacker with about 6 weeks' worth of beard. I could trust them. "

-Sans Authoritas

That description fits the "temporary" community. (Not the snowbirds, the vagrants that show up every year.)

MikePGS
March 9, 2008, 07:03 PM
The first hint should've been that after subduing the guy, he didn't go off on a rant about how HK is overrated :D

Sans Authoritas
March 9, 2008, 07:09 PM
Triphammer wrote: That description fits the "temporary" community. (Not the snowbirds, the vagrants that show up every year.)

Ah, I don't have a problem with migratory creatures of any sort, whether they be robins coming to my area for some worms, hunters coming for some deer, or backpackers coming for scenic vistas.

You can usually tell the sane backpackers from the insane ones. The sane backpackers have a crazy look in their eyes, true, but their hatchets generally aren't encrusted with blood.

-Sans Authoritas

Bones11b
March 9, 2008, 07:13 PM
The first hint should've been that after subduing the guy, he didn't go off on a rant about how HK is overrated

That's along the lines of what I was thinking. Something like "This is a 1911, not some overpriced piece of HK plastic so don't you move." ;)

SilentStalker
March 9, 2008, 07:13 PM
Um, that is odd. There must be more to that story as they usually do not do fulfledged manhunts of any sort down here for purse snatching. If they get away then they usually just get away down here. You must live in small town or something.

phantomak47
March 9, 2008, 07:35 PM
New Bedford is a dumpppppp.......when I lived in the Peoples Republic of Mass, we would play them in Basketball........that town should be............

Crunker1337
March 9, 2008, 09:34 PM
Responsible citizenship right there ^^

ColinthePilot
March 10, 2008, 01:58 AM
I usually try to be hospitable and helpful when I can. I've helped a guy fix a double flat in the middle of nowhere, I've pushed motorcycles out of traffic and given the guy enough gas to get to the gas station, I've pulled people out of holes they dug themselves into. I've done all those things. Trick is, I won't do it unless I'm armed. Usually I have a friend with me who is also armed. Helping people out in a tough spot is still a good thing to do. Being prepared for the worst when you do it is better.

silverlance
March 10, 2008, 02:12 AM
The gun at my side ought to give me more courage to do things that I would do even without it at my side.

The guy done right.

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