Kentucky Lawmaker Wants to Make Anonymous Internet Posting Illegal


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funnybone
March 10, 2008, 11:56 PM
:fire:

Kentucky Lawmaker Wants to Make Anonymous Internet Posting Illegal

Wednesday, Mar 05, 2008 - 11:11 PM Updated: 12:40 PM

By Kellie Wilson
E-mail | Biography
Kentucky Representative Tim Couch filed a bill this week to make anonymous posting online illegal.

The bill would require anyone who contributes to a website to register their real name, address and e-mail address with that site.

Their full name would be used anytime a comment is posted.

If the bill becomes law, the website operator would have to pay if someone was allowed to post anonymously on their site. The fine would be five-hundred dollars for a first offense and one-thousand dollars for each offense after that.

Representative Couch says he filed the bill in hopes of cutting down on online bullying. He says that has especially been a problem in his Eastern Kentucky district.

Action News 36 asked people what they thought about the bill.

Some said they felt it was a violation of First Amendment rights. Others say it is a good tool toward eliminating online harassment.

Represntative Couch says enforcing this bill if it became law would be a challenge


http://www.wtvq.com/content/midatlantic/tvq/video.apx.-content-articles-TVQ-2008-03-05-0011.html

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Oana
March 10, 2008, 11:59 PM
Representative Couch says enforcing this bill if it became law would be a challenge

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a clear winner in the "Understatement of the Year" Award!

FieroCDSP
March 11, 2008, 12:00 AM
THe key to eliminating online harrassment is for parents to teach their kids to be respectful to others, and to MONITOR their children. This bill could catch some momentum, but I don't think it'll go through.

Flyboy
March 11, 2008, 12:03 AM
Didn't the Supreme Court already say that anonymous speech is a vital part of free speech? If my memory's not playing tricks on me, I don't expect Mr. Couch's law to last long.

Ah, yes, found it: McIntyre v. Ohio Elections Commission. http://straylight.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/93-986.ZS.html

kurtmax
March 11, 2008, 12:11 AM
This bill will never pass. Firstly it wouldn't pass a constitutional test. Secondly, even if it did, people would just host their applications outside of the US. Problem solved.

ReadyontheRight
March 11, 2008, 12:18 AM
...enforcing this bill if it became law would be a challenge

That quote should be written in stone on every Federal and State House of Congress in the country.

More feel-good legislation that only punishes the law-abiding.

When will the grown-ups get elected?

Guitargod1985
March 11, 2008, 12:19 AM
Others say it is a good tool toward eliminating online harassment.

My question is, aside from the obvious constitutional conflict, who the hell would ever support such a notion? I swear, not a single day goes by that I fail to be astounded by the absolute stupidity of so many people in this country.

Carl N. Brown
March 11, 2008, 12:22 AM
That's like allowing "handles" for CB radio users. The chaos that anonymous or pseudonymous postings cause in the internet threatens the very orderliness of the universe itself. Save us Rep. Couch. Is anything left unregulated or micromanaged? Let's outlaw mismatched socks while we are at it.

Robert Hairless
March 11, 2008, 12:38 AM
Representative Tim Couch and the great state of Kentucky now have a remarkable opportunity to generate a lot of attention for themselves.

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children specifically advises parents to do the exact opposite of what Rep. Couch wants to require. They urge parents to keep their children anonymous on the Internet:

Never give out identifying information — home address, school name, or telephone number — in a public message such as chat or newsgroups, and be sure you’re dealing with someone both you and your children know and trust before giving out this information via E-mail. Think carefully before revealing any personal information such as age, financial information, or marital status. Do not post photographs of your children in newsgroups or on web sites available to the public. Consider using a pseudonym, avoid listing your child’s name and E-mail address in any public directories and profiles, and find out about your ISP’s privacy policies and exercise your options for how your personal information may be used.

A possible compromise would be for Kentucky to license and bond all forum operators and Internet Service Providers to ensure that they do not reveal the real identities of children whose parents comply with the proposed Kentucky law.

Of course then it would be necessary for the operators of Internet areas to verify that the parents are indeed parents and the children are indeed children, which would be relatively easy to do if each Internet operator required the parents and children to appear before them in person with proof of age and identity before being allowed to post anything or chat anywhere.

There might be a slight hurdle for law enforcement agencies and task forces that attempt to trap pedophiles by using fake names and ages, but Kentucky could stick to its guns. Then it would be a simple matter to comply with its law through screen names such as: "Suzy Johnson, Age 13 [Lt. George (Bubba) Wiznewczki, Age 35]" and "Bobby Lee, Age 16 [Det. Frank (The Mauler) McGee and Sgt. Horace (Horrible Harry) Tunk, Age 43]."

A few other snags might be the need to monitor all Internet activity throughout the world 24/7 and enforce Kentucky's law in places like China, Russia, New York City, and Iran. I've no doubt that Rep. Couch would be willing to have his secretary do it in her spare time.

We should be grateful to the various states and their electorates for providing positions to people like Rep. Tim Couch who otherwise might be wandering the streets, bumping into lampposts, and delivering speeches in tongues unknown to other human beings.

If Rep. Couch is unmarried somebody should introduce him to Rep. Carolyn McCarthy of the U.S. Congress. I detect the possibility of a natural affinity between them and I think they might hit it off immediately. That's good as long as they don't breed.

jrfoxx
March 11, 2008, 06:49 AM
THe key to eliminating online harrassment is..to log off of the website on which you feel you are being harrassed, and do not return if you feel it is to much to bear
There, fixed it to apply what should be insanely obvious common sense.
Good golly, are people SO dependant of the govt. for everything they cant figure this out?:banghead:

Autolycus
March 11, 2008, 07:18 AM
I thought Kentucky elected freedom loving politicians? Guess not...

Isn't he a Republican? Hmm...

Either way I am glad I voted for a candidate who supports my rights.

Nobody's_Hero
March 11, 2008, 07:49 AM
What about the harassment you get by providing your name and contact information after posting on the internet?

I swear, I share my email address with one person and the next thing you know, I'm getting 50 emails a day about enlarging my penis.

Wineoceros
March 11, 2008, 09:32 AM
I wonder how many e-mails from anonymous accounts he's received telling him what a bone-headed idea this is.

I love irony.

RLsnow
March 11, 2008, 09:38 AM
i wonder how the damn he is gonna know that my name is not REALLY harry jonson...

rdhood
March 11, 2008, 12:24 PM
There are so many technological and legal roadblocks to making this happen that it boggles the mind.

Biological trigger locks for guns are more feasible. The same kind of technology would have to be used for both.

Mall Ninja
March 11, 2008, 12:25 PM
There might be a slight hurdle for law enforcement agencies and task forces that attempt to trap pedophiles by using fake names and ages, but Kentucky could stick to its guns. Then it would be a simple matter to comply with its law through screen names such as: "Suzy Johnson, Age 13 [Lt. George (Bubba) Wiznewczki, Age 35]" and "Bobby Lee, Age 16 [Det. Frank (The Mauler) McGee and Sgt. Horace (Horrible Harry) Tunk, Age 43]."

A few other snags might be the need to monitor all Internet activity throughout the world 24/7 and enforce Kentucky's law in places like China, Russia, New York City, and Iran. I've no doubt that Rep. Couch would be willing to have his secretary do it in her spare time.

Hairless, you never cease to amuse! Keep it up! ROFLMAO!

littlegator
March 11, 2008, 12:27 PM
Al Gore created the internet - he could find a way to make it work... ;)

MrAnteater
March 11, 2008, 01:11 PM
Could you imagine a guy on a porn site and his real name was Harry Palms? :D

The Lone Haranguer
March 11, 2008, 01:45 PM
What for??? :rolleyes: If someone makes, e.g., a terrorist threat or discusses illegal activity on the Internet, there are existing procedures to trace them.

JeremySmith
March 11, 2008, 01:55 PM
These politicians need to do their jobs, and take care of the real problems, and stop dreaming up new ones to "solve".

Have to use your real name on the internet? Oh the horror!

The Lone Haranguer
March 11, 2008, 02:08 PM
Well, I might as well get it over with and reveal my real name. Ira Paul Freely. Just call me I.P. :neener:

Eightball
March 11, 2008, 02:24 PM
Seems like an easy way for .gov to track what people are saying. I know that sounds paranoid, but c'mon--you think they don't like the idea of it being easier for them to get an idea of who's saying what? Why would he be threatened by posts from people he doesn't know?

kurtmax
March 11, 2008, 02:45 PM
Seems like an easy way for .gov to track what people are saying. I know that sounds paranoid, but c'mon--you think they don't like the idea of it being easier for them to get an idea of who's saying what? Why would he be threatened by posts from people he doesn't know?

Don't kid yourself. It's already extremely easy to track what someone is saying on the internet.

littlegator
March 11, 2008, 02:58 PM
I just tracked what you said.

230RN
March 11, 2008, 03:30 PM
I swear, I share my email address with one person and the next thing you know, I'm getting 50 emails a day about enlarging my penis.

I never told anybody online that I was fat, bald, horny, and had a small pp.

And yet....

Art Eatman
March 11, 2008, 03:53 PM
230RN, there are some things I just really don't want to know...

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