Why do some transfer FFL charge sales tax and some don't?


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Yugiho
March 12, 2008, 09:08 AM
I've done dealings with several FFLs in my area. Most have not charged me more than their transfer fee of around ~$30 flat for any firearm whether bought in or out of state. Not too long ago I used someone else closer to my home. He quoted me a transfer fee. I agreed. I have email proof. Then when I went to pick up the gun, he charged me sales tax on the full amount of the gun. He said it was mandatory. I was livid. This guy was clearly not understanding the law or wanted to pocket the tax money for himself.

Anyway, he threatened to return my gun to the sender, but of course I needed to pay his FFL fee and postage to mail it. Or else he was just going to keep the gun until I pay up his tax fee + transfer fee+ call in fee, which totaled to over $125.

I didn't want to leave the gun in his possession, so I paid up.

As I understand it, the FFL is allowed to charge tax on the transfer fee only, not on the purchase price of the gun from out of state.

How does this guy get away with this? What recourse do I have to get my money back?:cuss:

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Double Naught Spy
March 12, 2008, 09:26 AM
The sales tax charge isn't legal. He doesn't have the right to charge sales tax on an item he didn't sell.

News Shooter
March 12, 2008, 09:27 AM
Tell that to my FFL

strat81
March 12, 2008, 10:09 AM
Something is amiss with that.

You are NOT buying the gun from your local dealer. You are buying the gun from CDNN, SOG, Sarco (or whoever the net dealer is). Your dealer can charge you sales tax on the transfer fee only since that is the only product/service he is selling.

If you do not like your dealer, you can make his life miserable by contacting your state's Department of Taxation or Revenue Sales Tax Unit and complaining about your dealer's unethical sales tax practices.

Now, technically you are supposed to pay use tax on any and all items you purchase from out-of-state vendors that do not charge you sales tax. If any of you work in the accounting department of a corporation, you'll probably find they are sticklers about use tax. Your state Department of Taxation or Revenue should have use tax forms available for download.

Ala Dan
March 12, 2008, 10:13 AM
Sales tax on transfers should be abolished~! We have NEVER charged sales
tax on firearms received as a transfer; as all applicable taxes are taken care
of before we receive the firearm~! :scrutiny: :)

Yugiho
March 12, 2008, 10:28 AM
This shop is in Florida. I bought the gun from a private individual from out of state.

What I really need is the specific law/rule regarding sales tax, both federal and state.

I'm almost positive he's keeping the proceeds. As soon as I get some more information, I'm going to make a huge ruckus, including reporting him to the Better Business Bureau, and the State Agencies.

boredelmo
March 12, 2008, 10:38 AM
How did he even figure out purchase price? This was a PRIVATE transaction, he should not charge anything in relation to the actual firearm, just the SERVICE of receiving it.

Warn others, whats this shop's name? BBB for sure, they are very helpful (albeit sometimes slow). Heck, call the ATF and explain what took place.

M2 Carbine
March 12, 2008, 10:40 AM
I think the only thing he could legally charge tax on is the amount he charges for the "service" (transfer) he provides in taking dilevery of the gun.

I have never paid "sales tax" to a dealer for doing a transfer.
Matter of fact one dealer told me to order and pay for the gun myself and he wouldn't have to charge me sales tax.


For some time now some States have been trying to get laws passed where they can charge sales tax on items bought out of State.
This could open a real can of worms.
I haven't heard anymore about it in several years.

Flame Red
March 12, 2008, 10:40 AM
If this occured in Florida, I would believe that most FFLs do NOT charge sales taxes on the guns or the transfer (as that is a service, not subject to sales tax presently).

However, if you were to file a complaint with the Florida Dept of Revenue, I think that you will find they would want the sales tax from you. I don't think he is supposed to collect it, but rather you (out of the goodness of your heart) is supposed to fill out a form and send it in directly to Tallahasse.

Same goes for other things. I cannot tell you how many times friends have bought furnature from North Carolina (not paying sales tax) only to get a polite letter from the state some months later asked them to pay sales tax. I think the state has a deal with those furniture places or truck drivers.

So perhaps he pocketed it (or maybe not). In either event, post his name here so others know and don't use him again of course.

boredelmo
March 12, 2008, 10:42 AM
Hm, but I mean, if you have stuff ordered from the internet, the state doesn't charge sales tax if it's from another state. That's interesting Flame Red, haven't thought about that.

waterhouse
March 12, 2008, 10:47 AM
If you google "Florida sales and use tax" you'll get the laws you are looking for.

While your dealer should [probably] not have collected tax, from a legal standpoint you are responsible for paying that tax to the state. The point of the Use tax is a)to make the state money and b) to take away an advantage that an out of state dealer has by not having to charge sale tax (thus encouraging you to buy in state, which leads directly back to "a").

See the section on Use tax here http://dor.myflorida.com/dor/taxes/sales_tax.html :

Use tax complements and is applied in the same manner as sales tax. The use tax rate and sales tax rate are the same, including discretionary sales surtax, if applicable. Use tax is due on purchases made out of state and brought into Florida within 6 months of the purchase date. Also, if you purchase a product tax-exempt that you plan to sell at retail, but end up using it at your place of business, the "use" of the product is subject to tax. If you purchase materials that are "consumed" in a manufacturing process to create your end product but are not part of the end product, those materials are subject to tax.

The "use" component of the sales and use tax provides uniform taxation on items that are purchased outside Florida but are used or stored in the state. If the item brought into Florida is subject to tax, a credit for lawfully imposed taxes paid to another state, a U.S. territory, or the District of Columbia is permitted. Credit is not given for taxes paid to another country.

I say "[probably]" because I am not at all familiar with Florida law. In Texas, it is the responsibility of the end user (the guy buying the gun) to submit Use Tax to the state.

Back to the original question, I'd say the reasons that some dealers charge tax are:
1) they are cheating the system and pocketing the cash
2) they don't understand the law, and think they are supposed to collect it, and they collect it and submit it to the state with all of the other sales tax
3) the state has specifically told them that they need to collect sales tax on such items.

waterhouse
March 12, 2008, 10:51 AM
For some time now some States have been trying to get laws passed where they can charge sales tax on items bought out of State.

I think in many states the laws have been on the books for years, they just haven't been very widely enforced, so many people either don't know about them or don't care.

Hm, but I mean, if you have stuff ordered from the internet, the state doesn't charge sales tax if it's from another state. That's interesting Flame Red, haven't thought about that.

The state you are buying from doesn't charge tax. The state you are living in probably does. It is just that most people don't pay it.

In Texas, here is the form you are supposed to fill out every time you buy something from the internet and don't pay sales tax:

http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/taxforms/01-156.pdf

boredelmo
March 12, 2008, 10:52 AM
That's really weird. I hope i don't go down like Al Capone!

Yugiho
March 12, 2008, 10:57 AM
This is interesting. But I gather it's not set in stone. Meaning it's not law. I've ordered thousands of $$ worth off of the internet and not paid tax.

If it's law, surely the state will come down hard on sites such as Amazon.com to collect taxes for them before delivery...?

Gator
March 12, 2008, 10:57 AM
I'm sure it varies by state, but in Illinois, for example the buyer is responsible for paying the sales tax no matter where the item comes from. My dealer dosen't collect it, but he hands out the state form you are supposed to fill out and send in with your payment.

waterhouse
March 12, 2008, 11:03 AM
This is interesting. But I gather it's not set in stone. Meaning it's not law. I've ordered thousands of $$ worth off of the internet and not paid tax.

It's the law in many states. Like driving over the speed limit, the fact that you have not been caught and punished yet does not mean you aren't breaking the law.


If it's law, surely the state will come down hard on sites such as Amazon.com to collect taxes for them before delivery...?

They can't come down hard on Amazon (yet) because the law usually states it is the responsibility of the buyer to pay the Use Tax. They have no legal grounds to go after Amazon.

According to this site,
http://www.michigan.gov/treasury/0,1607,7-121-1748_1904_1989-5781--,00.html

every state that collects sales tax also has a use tax LAW.


Facts on Internet and Mail Order Purchases

* Every state with a sales tax has a companion tax for purchases made outside the state. In Michigan, that tax is called the "use tax" but might be more aptly described as a remote sales tax because it is a 6 percent tax owed on sales made remotely (i.e. outside of Michigan.)
* The use tax is not a new law; it was enacted in 1937. With the birth and rapid growth of Internet sales, revenue lost from non-reporting of the use tax is becoming substantial.
* Remote selling to consumers nationally is estimated at $279 billion in 2001. By 2005, projected remote selling to U.S. consumers will grow to $429 billion, largely due to sales over the Internet.
* Currently, Michigan is losing an estimated $210 million in use taxes from remote sales in fiscal year 2001. Remote sales over the Internet will cause this loss to increase dramatically in the years ahead to $349 million in FY 2005.
* The estimated loss of $349 million is comprised of $116 million from the School Aid Fund, and $233 million from the General Fund.
* Use tax is required by law when a person purchases a good from out of state and the retailer hasn't charged sales tax in their jurisdiction.
* Non-compliance has been a problem for years with mail order sales, but the issue of "remote selling" becomes much more serious with the fast growth of Internet sales.

In Michigan, it has been a law since 1937. While states lost money for years because of catalogue sales, they didn't seem to mind much. I'm guessing with the amount they are losing due to the internet they are going to start cracking down on it quite a bit.

electronrider
March 12, 2008, 11:09 AM
If you make an out of state purchase, and do not pay sales tax to your state, you are in violation of your states tax code. Now, does everyone do this? Probably not. However, it is YOUR responsibility to do this, rather than the FFL that did the transfer. It is highly probable that he pocketed the money. If I were you I would take this as a lesson learned, and keep your mouth shut, else you get to deal with an audit on your state taxes this year, when you forget to pay that sales tax on an out of state purchase. I would not give that FFl any more of your hard earned money.

foghornl
March 12, 2008, 11:14 AM
In Ohio, they ask this question on the State Income Tax form...
Don't remember exactly how it is worded, but there is a question on out-of-state purchases.

RPCVYemen
March 12, 2008, 11:32 AM
Heck, call the ATF and explain what took place.

What do you expect the ATF to say about a state sales tax?

Mike

asknight
March 12, 2008, 11:33 AM
Why are you guys telling the FFL how much you paid for the item? It's none of their business, since they didn't sell it. They're only legally able to charge a tax on an item or service that they sell to you. Lawfully, you owe the tax to the state from which you purchased the item, and your FFL is not able to legally collect tax for another state or jurisdiction.

The Govt doesn't have the technology to reliably and conveniently facilitate the collection of taxes on goods sold over the internet across state lines. So, are we all criminals because the Govt passed yet another law that they can't enforce?

nalioth
March 12, 2008, 11:41 AM
I have found these types of dealers to be one of two types of people:

1) Honest but misinformed about tax laws. I have one of these guys down here, and he is one of the best people you'll meet, but he 'was told by the State boys' to collect tax on everything he transfers. I don't argue, but took my business elsewhere.

2) The Crooked dealer who knows the laws but is just out to 'make that extra bit'. I have unfortunately encountered some of these, too.

RPCVYemen
March 12, 2008, 11:42 AM
In Ohio, they ask this question on the State Income Tax form...
Don't remember exactly how it is worded, but there is a question on out-of-state purchases.

I haven't done my NC taxes this year, but I think they automatically compute an "out of state purchase sales tax" based on your income. If you have kept accurate records on all your internet purchases, then you can dispute the computed tax. My guess is that's a real quick way to get audited - but I don't know that for sure.

My other guess is that if the dealer marks "sales tax" on the receipt, and pockets the money, he'd be committing some kind of crime. Did he give you a receipt that clearly marked some amount as the sales tax?

Mike

SASS#23149
March 12, 2008, 11:55 AM
Did this dealer give you a receipt showing the sales taxes being paid?
If not,he pocketed the money.

my son ,in Wa state,just paid tax on the wepaon he purchased,I'll look into whether or not he should have.I know we have a 'use tax',but not sure the dealer can or must collect it...I think it's voluntary.
yea,right.

Yugiho
March 12, 2008, 12:03 PM
I do have the sales receipt showing a line that says tax. It's one of those generic receipts with no identifying marks that show it was from the gun store.

I'll wait a little while before revealing which store this is. The guy may have had the right to collect taxes according to some of the posters...

moosehunt
March 12, 2008, 12:13 PM
I'd like to know how he knew the price to charge tax against? As the recieving FFL, he had no reason to know. When I do this, which is often, I tell the client that the finances associated with the purchase are between he and the seller; I'm not involved. I rarely know the financial facts. In the cover letter to the person or business forwarding the firearm to me (I have to send them a copy of my FFL), I instruct them to make any financial reciepts out to the buyer, not me. The recieving FFL cannot charge sales tax for the purchase price. He may or may not be required to charge sales tax on the service, depending on the state, i.e. sales tax only applies to material items, not services, in some states.

As stated, you the buyer, by law, are required to pay sales tax in accordance with your state, county, and city laws. This applies to any out of state purchase (actually, in state purchases, too), and is far from new. It is law. It is generally referred to as "use tax"--same as sales tax, but you, the purchaser, take care of reporting it. Technically, this includes if you buy a used lawn mower from your neighbor, or a used firearm from your buddy. Very few people comply with this law, much to the state's aggrevation. It amazes me how many people are unaware of these laws.

Also, you talk about a "transfer fee" in a way that makes it sound as though there is such a fee established. There is not. A dealer may charge as little or as much as he wants, including nothing at all. I certainly would recommend you not do further business with this dealer. I suspect you have learned that it would be wise to address this "tax" matter with dealers in the future before you engage their services.

Soybomb
March 12, 2008, 12:15 PM
I'd just take it as a lesson and no deal with him again. What did the sales tax come out to? $30-60? How many hours of your life and how much frustration will you put up with for that?

I'd like to know how he knew the price to charge tax against? As the recieving FFL, he had no reason to know.
Everyone seems to be asking this question. Is it that unthinkable that the seller included a receipt in the box? I believe most of my used guns have come with one.

Yugiho
March 12, 2008, 12:23 PM
As far as how did the seller know... He was admiring the gun and asked how much I paid. I told him. I didn't know he was going to charge me tax. I thought we were just having a friendly chit chat. Bear in mind, no FFL ever in the last 20 years charged me a sales tax on an out of state transfer. I expected the same of this FFL. Boy, was I ever wrong. I should have taken a picture of my face that instant. It was a look of utter shock. :what::eek:

This is a big lesson on my part. I will make sure exactly what I'm required to pay an FFL before I initiate a transfer.

moosehunt
March 12, 2008, 12:36 PM
You might want to go visit with this fellow with the knowledge you now have. When properly worded, it might encourage him to quickly and quietly return your "tax" money.

Also, you are not dealing with an FFL. He is a dealer with an FFL (Federal Firearms License). I hate being called an FFL. An FFL is a piece of paper. I am a person who has an FFL.

asknight
March 12, 2008, 01:26 PM
+1

I agree that you should go back for a visit and ask that your tax be returned as he is not a legal entity doing business in the state that the firearm came from and has no authority or obligation to collect sales tax on it. Additionally, he has no legal way to pay the taxes to the state that he collected on behalf of, so it's a clear case of tax fraud.

moosehunt
March 12, 2008, 01:41 PM
Well, actually he does. I'm sure he has a resale permit, or whatever the sales tax license is called in that state, thus he could (should, I guess, since he collected it) report it there, but he then has to call it a sale. That isn't really kosher though, because he didn't sell it. But that's how he would report it and pay it to the state. Remember, sales tax is only collected by merchants to be passed on to the state. They get nothing of it, or near nothing. Some states do provide a miniscule collection fee, and I do mean miniscule!

asknight
March 12, 2008, 01:54 PM
The sales tax on the item belongs to the state it came from, not the state in which the dealer is operating. The dealer is not organized in the originating state, and can not pay taxes there. Collecting taxes on an item for a state that isn't legally entitled to them = fraud.

The seller is responsible for paying collected sales taxes to the jurisdictional authority. That principle is valid in all 50 states.

ckay
March 12, 2008, 01:57 PM
I had this happen to me as well. Needless to say, I found a new FFL.

RPCVYemen
March 12, 2008, 02:04 PM
The sales tax on the item belongs to the state it came from, not the state in which the dealer is operating.

So I don't have to pay a sales tax on a car that I buy in my state, if it came from another state?

I though what mattered was where the transaction took place - and that the states are currently arguing that the interstate transactions take place where the buyer lives.

Mike

asknight
March 12, 2008, 02:10 PM
RPCVYemen, you pay your sales tax on your vehicle when you get it licensed. That tax goes to your state, since all car manufacturers are organized in all states as for-profit corporations via "corporate dealerships" in each state.

asknight
March 12, 2008, 02:15 PM
The old original idea is that the seller is responsible for the tax. This prompted states to encourage business development and growth in their states. Now, the "welfare" states with very little manufacturing are trying to turn it into a consumption tax instead of a production tax (or BOTH, in some cases) where the buyer pays the tax to the buyers state. That isn't right, and isn't fair to any of the states and businesses out there organized in a state that provided economic assistance, aide, or tax incentives to the company.

The way I see it, if a state wants to collect a tax on a good, then they need to encourage the manufacturer to set up shop in their state and manufacture it there. That's the way it still is in most places.

texas bulldog
March 12, 2008, 02:50 PM
hey waterhouse, please don't tell the state about that transfer. i seem to have "misplaced" my use tax form.

moosehunt
March 12, 2008, 03:07 PM
Asknight--there are obviously state differences. In my state, yes, as a retail seller I collect sales tax, indeed it is specific to the county where the transaction (sale transfer) took place (rates vary by county here). If I make an out of state sale outside the state, I do not collect sales tax. Indeed, the law includes if I make an out of state sale while in state, through the mail, for example, I do not collect sales tax (provided I ship the item out of state). It is specifically entered as an out of state sale, and is a sale for which I do not forward sales tax to the state. If I recieved a firearm and charged sales tax on the transfer, as happened to our poor thread originator, I would have to report it as a sale, hence forward the collected sales tax.

nalioth
March 12, 2008, 03:20 PM
If I recieved a firearm and charged sales tax on the transfer, as happened to our poor thread originator, I would have to report it as a sale, hence forward the collected sales tax. Nobody has a problem with sales tax on a service.

It is the dealers who do transfers and charge tax on 'their appraised value' of the firearm which they never had in their stock.

Gunnerpalace
March 12, 2008, 03:24 PM
http://www.michigan.gov/treasury/0,1...5781--,00.html


The Fed's trump this states laws.

That's a good thing too. :D

tblt
March 12, 2008, 03:48 PM
I live in tampa Fl and the guy I use does not even charge tax on the transfer fee.He does make a copy of my reciept for some reason.
He makes the call I hand him $25 bucks cash and out the door I go with my gun.

nalioth
March 12, 2008, 04:01 PM
I live in tampa Fl and the guy I use does not even charge tax on the transfer fee.He does make a copy of my reciept for some reason.
He makes the call I hand him $25 bucks cash and out the door I go with my gun. Oh, he's charging you tax, he's just rolled it all into a friendly simple figure.

Here in Texas, services are taxed. Most of the folks I know that offer "flat rates" for services have already figured the tax on their actual rate.

For instance for a $25 transfer fee here in Houston, the actual 'fee' is $23.09 and the tax is $1.91 to reach the 'price out the door'. You can play with the math more if your state charges for a call to NICS or any other charges to figure out what your dealers actual 'fee' is.

waterhouse
March 12, 2008, 04:16 PM
hey waterhouse, please don't tell the state about that transfer. i seem to have "misplaced" my use tax form.

What transfer? :D

atomchaser
March 12, 2008, 04:30 PM
I've done transfers through mulitple FFLs in Florida. Only one claimed he had to collect tax on the purchase. I asked him ahead of time and he didn't get my business. I don't know how as a small business they would account for the transaction from a bookeeping standpoint if they never purchased or sold the item. The guys probably pocketing the money, but I don't know if it's worth your trouble to pursue.

ke6guj
March 12, 2008, 05:48 PM
NV and FL law are most likely different from CA in regards to sales tax on transfers. CA's Board of Equalization (sales tax collectors) regards a dealer transfer to be a drop shipment, and that makes the CA dealer the retailer in the BOE's eyes.

Here is a thread with some of the correspondence between a CA dealer and the BOE on the sales tax info.
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=74622&highlight=boe

moosehunt
March 12, 2008, 05:51 PM
Nalioth--sorry, I used the wrong word. I meant a sales tax on the "price" of the gun, not the service fee. In some states, service (labor) is not subject to sales tax. Also, in some states, mine for certain, it is highly illegal to include sales tax in a price without disclosing such. I suspect the $25 tbit is referring to is the fee that the state charges for a background check call, collected through the dealer. It is not in every state, you may not be familiar with it. In my state, and several others, you don't deal with the federal agency, just the state. They have a fee ($25 is common) that is automatically billed to your account when you (a licensed dealer) make the call, which is required on all transfers except to those with an FFL or a CC permit. Oh, there's no sales tax on that fee, which indeed is a tax already, in actuality.

bogie
March 12, 2008, 05:55 PM
Guys, I went around with all this with something last night and this morning.

IMHO, the guy is doing a service, and that's not sales-taxable. If he collects money for the item in question, then that's sales-taxable.

When I asked the guy at the Missouri Department of Revenue about use tax, the response I got was basically "are you kidding? nobody does that."

tblt
March 12, 2008, 06:46 PM
It is a 20 dollar transfer fee and a 5 dollar background check.
10 min he makes 25 bucks not bad a little paperwork and a phone call.

poppy
March 13, 2008, 11:05 AM
Yugiho, let's look at the numbers.

If your dealer is really collecting sales tax on the purchase price of the gun and doing it legally then he is sending it to the state.

Again if he is legit, then the purchase price of the gun will show up on his income statement. So that would mean that he collected tax that he did not keep and recorded a sale that he did not collect money on.

That would mean that his income is overstated and would increase his income tax liability. If he is doing all of that then he is really dumb and losing money every time he makes a transfer.

Likely, as many have said, he is pocketing the "tax".

I'm not sure you can do much without revealing yourself and your use tax liability to the state.

Name the dealer.

Yugiho
March 13, 2008, 04:37 PM
I sent an email regarding the "use tax" on a firearm purchased from a "private individual" out of state to the Florida Dept of Revenue a couple of days ago. They just called me back.

Here's what they said...

"It is our opinion that as long as it was purchased from a "private Individual" and not from a dealer out of state, you don't have to pay the "use tax."

For a written letter attesting to this, he asked me to write a letter (not email) to them requesting documentation.

I'm going to put the letter in the mail tomorrow.

asknight
March 13, 2008, 04:45 PM
Yugiho, sounds similar to AR. AR doesn't want to be bothered about use tax unless it's $2k or above in amount of sale. Just like buying a used car from an individual.

Hands of blue
March 13, 2008, 07:17 PM
If it's law, surely the state will come down hard on sites such as Amazon.com to collect taxes for them before delivery...?

If Amazon or whom ever you ordered the item from has nexus in your state the have to charge sales tax. If not and the item is taxable you are responsible to pay it. If the seller is doing business in your state (office, employees instate or delivered the item to you in there truck ) then they have nexus.

A individual is unlikely to be audited as the audit is likely to cost more then the amount gained, but business are audited all the time.

Blue Line
March 14, 2008, 03:44 AM
I had an FFL in Naples,fl try to charge me sales tax on the whole gun instead of the handling charge. I found another FFL who was more honest.

Yugiho
March 14, 2008, 09:06 AM
After some contemplation on the legality of him taking my money, I've decided not to pursue getting my money back. Even though it's the State of Florida Dept of Revenue's opinion that there's no "Use tax" on a private purchase from out of state, it's really not worth the fight to get a few dollars back. Besides this guy might shoot me in the heated argument. :scrutiny:

My main beef with this FFL holder is not that he charges sales tax on the transfer. If he told me up front that that's what his policy is, I would've found another dealer to do my transfer, as I know a few in my area who only charges $30 flat. He should have been more honest up front rather than to surprise me with it when I went to pick up the firearm.

Initially, I contacted this FFL holder from GunBroker.com asking how much an out of state firearm transfer is going to cost?
Below is his short email reply which I copy pasted in it's entirety. Am I wrong to assume that $25 was all that was going to be charged?

________________________
$25.00 Thanks Allan Pu

Top Gun And Sporting Goods
904-276-4488
FFL/SOT
_________________________


Ultimately, to calculate his fee for transferring, he added $25 for transfer fee+ $8 call in fee + cost of the gun, then calculated the tax on the entire amount. This is a far cry from $25 he quoted me in the initial email.

I do not want people calling him or bashing him for his practices. This is "The High Road" after all. As far as we know at this point, he may think he is well within the law to collect sales tax.

I'm Just letting the good people of Florida be aware that this is what's going on at this shop and to stay away, unless you want to be shocked as I was. :what:

This is the shop info from GunBroker. Notice that there's no FFL transfer fee posted in the info...

_________________________
Allan Pu
Top Gun And Sporting Goods
638 Blanding Blvd.
Orange Park, FL 32073
email: Click here to email me
phone: 904-276-4488

Hours: 10:00am-6:00pm Mon-Sat, Sun Closed
____________________________


Stay far far away from this shop.

asknight
March 14, 2008, 12:43 PM
Just because he may think he is well within the law, doesn't make him so.

Hook686
March 14, 2008, 01:00 PM
"Words don't mean, people mean." - S.I. Hayakawa, sematicist


Ultimately, to calculate his fee for transferring, he added $25 for transfer fee+ $8 call in fee + cost of the gun, then calculated the tax on the entire amount. This is a far cry from $25 he quoted me in the initial email.


Looks to me like the transfer fee was $25 as quoted. There also seem to be additional costs you did not specifically inquire about. Should the FFL dealer have 'spoon fed you' and told you answers to questions you did not ask ? Well in a socialistic type world I suppose the other guy, or government has a duty to hold your hand and protect you from yourself and others.

Keep in mind that this is just one possible view. I think the actions of the FFL dealer really sucked. I would not do business with him either. However, this is a good message ... check out all costs when conducting business with anyone.

Soybomb
March 14, 2008, 01:28 PM
There also seem to be additional costs you did not specifically inquire about. Should the FFL dealer have 'spoon fed you' and told you answers to questions you did not ask ?
How much more can the guy do other than ask what it will cost? The real answer would have been $33 plus sales tax on the gun's price. I don't see why the buyer should be expected to ask if there's a call in fee, saturday afternoon fee, box opening fee, dealer feeling a little gassy today or anything else. he asked the cost and was lied to.

I think you made the right call, don't do business with him anymore, tell your friends and everyone at the range about him.

Flame Red
March 14, 2008, 01:32 PM
I would post this on Florida Shooter's Network too so other Central Floridians can avoid this a-hole like the plague.

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