which DCM AR15 to get?


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Belgiboy
March 12, 2008, 11:15 AM
I am saving up the cash for a DCM AR15 and I'm almost there. My budget is about $1100-1200 for this one, and frankly that should be plenty. My requirements are match trigger, free floated heavy barrel with 1 in 8 twist, match sights (+/- 0.050" rear aperture sight). I was told you can get them with removable carry handle now, and that would be nice but not a must.
I've been looking at DPMS and Bushmaster, but I'm very open to suggestions.
This would be my first AR15 so I'm a little intimidated by building one myself but if that was the way to go, I know people who can help me... The whole idea is that I'll practice shooting for a couple of years and then maybe take the leap and enter a competition. Any (semi-)educated comments are welcome.

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30Cal
March 12, 2008, 11:26 AM
If you get the A4 upper make sure you ask and find out if it'll give enough elevation for 600yds. Some of them won't. 99% of the AR's on the highpower firing line are A2's.

Other than that, pretty much anybody can assemble an AR that will shoot matches.

Don't put off going to a match for lack of practice or gear. The sooner you get your feet wet, the better, and you'll be improving much much faster than you would on your own.

Besides, how do you know what you need to practice if you haven't shot a match?

redactor
March 12, 2008, 12:13 PM
I've settled on an RRA lower, and White Oak Armament A2 style upper with the pinned rear sight.

skinewmexico
March 12, 2008, 12:16 PM
I was going to say any lower, and a White Oak upper.

Belgiboy
March 12, 2008, 12:17 PM
Well, what I know about matches is that I've read about them. That is all, I don't claim to be anything more than a halfway decent shot when shooting prone, offhand or sitting. I'm pretty sure I'll have to work hard on all of that. But I definately see your point and I bet it is satifying shooting your first match, learning tons and not finishing last. I also have to save up for a spotting scope, shooting jacket, etc... I'm set already for reloading .223, so that is nice but working on a match load while still getting my technique down will probably be a little trying to say the least. Thanks for the tip on the A4 vs A2, that is definately a good point.

wanderinwalker
March 12, 2008, 12:34 PM
Get an A2 upper, a White Oak will get you all the way to High Master if you are capable of it. Add a lower with a tuned RRA trigger and you should be close to your budget.

Avoid the Bushmaster. I'm not saying they're bad guns, but everybody I know with a Bushy 2-stage trigger has had it replaced. I know one fellow whose brand-new Bushy varmint/target rifle started doubling on its first outing. Not good!

RE: Match loads. Here's the short and sweet: Get a box of Sierra 69gr MatchKings to shoot at 200 and 300 yards. Get either Varget or RL-15 (other powders work, but bear with me). Find some CCI-BR4 or Remington 7 1/2 primers. Check manufacturer's manuals for loads. Seat bullets to fit in the magazine. Work done. Oh, and don't use Federal cases if you can avoid it.

Other gear, other competitors will be glad to help you out with. Go to a match, be safe, observe, ask questions. You'll probably be able to get loaned a mat, scope and other necessities and niceties while you learn the ropes.

Good luck and shoot straight!

30Cal
March 12, 2008, 01:01 PM
I also have to save up for a spotting scope, shooting jacket, etc... I'm set already for reloading .223, so that is nice but working on a match load while still getting my technique down will probably be a little trying to say the least. Thanks for the tip on the A4 vs A2, that is definately a good point.

Loads are easy. The rings are pretty generous and it's the shooter that makes the score; not the stuff.

I'd seriously shoot 2-3 matches before you buy gear. Try out other people's stuff. That will save you from having to go back later and buy the right gear. Most newbs show up with a bunch of stuff that they have to sell off in short order.

cracked butt
March 12, 2008, 03:09 PM
I was told you can get them with removable carry handle now, and that would be nice but not a must.

If you are buying an AR for high power competition, get a fixed carry handle.



The whole idea is that I'll practice shooting for a couple of years and then maybe take the leap and enter a competition.


Shooting in a match is just like sex- you learn alot even when you are doing poorly than you do from practice:neener:
Seriously, find a club that has CMP matches and show up. They will give you an M1 to shoot and probably free ammo or ammo for a nominal fee. More importantly, you get your feet wet and will get all the first hand advice that you could handle.

Swampy
March 13, 2008, 09:16 AM
I was going to say any lower, and a White Oak upper.

Ditto..... That pretty much sums up the firing line at most of the X-Course matches I've been to in recent years.

The whole idea is that I'll practice shooting for a couple of years and then maybe take the leap and enter a competition.

You are not going to learn much that way.....

Get involved with a club-range that holds CMP-NRA Service Rifle or Short Course Highpower right off the bat if you want to learn how to shoot RIGHT without having to re-learn a lot of stuff you think you were doing right when you were by yourself.

Best regards,
Swampy

Garands forever

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