Any .223 Rounds hit hard enough to take out hog hunting?


PDA






tsanford405
March 13, 2008, 04:46 PM
See title! :) I will take my 7mm Rem Mag, but I was curious if an AR would do alright. Thanks!

If you enjoyed reading about "Any .223 Rounds hit hard enough to take out hog hunting?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
3pairs12
March 13, 2008, 04:49 PM
It would take down a hog with really good shot placement but I would use the 7mm Rem Mag if I were you.

ccd
March 13, 2008, 08:59 PM
Yes, plenty of 223 loadings will work for hogs, more or less any of the ones that are acceptable for deer will do. There have been plenty of recent posts on deer and 22 centerfires just search them. The 64gr Win PP, 53gr XXX from Corbon, 60 gr Partition from Federal or Black Hills, and the 55gr or 62gr TBBC Fedreal Tactical loads should all work fine.

These 22 loads are better suited for shooting hogs from blinds that are coming out to feed in fields, senderos or trails. If jump shooting or stalking hogs your 7mm would be much better, unless your AR is your work weapon or you are REALLY proficient with it. Hard for me to know over the Internet.

TAB
March 13, 2008, 09:04 PM
They can work, but I'd take something bigger... alot bigger.

LeonCarr
March 13, 2008, 09:05 PM
Another vote for the Winchester 64 grain power Point in the .223. You have to use good shot placement.

There are better tools for the job (.30 caliber and above).

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Zoogster
March 13, 2008, 09:41 PM
Will kill certainly. Quickly and humanely with a single shot? That is a bigger variable.

Take something larger.

W.E.G.
March 13, 2008, 10:06 PM
I think the question one should ask regarding choice of cartridge for any game is, "Will it penetrate the shoulder bone of the animal."

If the answer is no, the chance of inflicting a very nasty slow-death wound makes the cartridge a questionable choice for the average hunter.

Aint ya got a .308?

Are you REALLY going to crawl through 50 yards of head-high thorn bushes to recover a hog that doesn't DRT after being hit with a too-small caliber?

Exit wounds make tracking MUCH easier. Don't expect one with a .223.

rbernie
March 13, 2008, 10:14 PM
Depends on the size of the pig. Up to 150lb, a tough bullet would probably work OK.

Over 150lbs, I'd want something bigger.

Go for head shots.

TAB
March 13, 2008, 10:18 PM
Depends on the size of the pig. Up to 150lb, a tough bullet would probably work OK.

Over 150lbs, I'd want something bigger.

Go for head shots.

I've personally seen .30-06 ball glance off a big pigs head... as in looking down the sites...

rbernie
March 13, 2008, 11:39 PM
Put one in the ear canal and it ain't bouncing anywhere. :D

W.E.G.
March 13, 2008, 11:41 PM
9mm will bounce off a human skull if fired at the right angle.

I know this to be true.

Head shots are not reliably sure shots.

jaholder1971
March 14, 2008, 12:24 AM
Shot placement is king.

I'm the court Jester.

I'm taking my 7X57 or something larger.

Deer Hunter
March 14, 2008, 12:38 AM
Down here in Texas AR-15s are used all the time for hog hunting. The .223 will do the job nicely when you do your part.

BIGR
March 15, 2008, 01:21 PM
Use a bigger gun for sake of a clean kill. Yea the right shot with the .223 will do it but why chance it.

TCB in TN
March 15, 2008, 01:55 PM
Use a bigger gun for sake of a clean kill. Yea the right shot with the .223 will do it but why chance it.

That are be very careful about shot selection. I have used many different rounds to take hogs, and a .223 will certainly work, but I would look for a good shot into the back of the skull with small rounds like the .223. Especially with real big heavy Russian type hogs. They have big thick ribs, and usually a grissle plate over them. Small rounds can be slowed and deflected more easily than you think. They also have a very thick sloped forehead so straight on head shots can easily glance off. Big bullets are better, but small ones can get it done!

MCgunner
March 15, 2008, 02:54 PM
.22s are for squirrels. Here's the perfect excuse to get a real hunting rifle. :D

Your 7 mag is overkill, but mas bien overkill than underkill.

Sharps-shooter
March 15, 2008, 04:44 PM
Put one in the ear canal and it ain't bouncing anywhere.

The ear canal in a pig is smaller around than a pencil eraser, and isn't where it looks like it would be from the outside. If i could make that shot, I could probably just use my light saber instead.

rbernie
March 15, 2008, 06:11 PM
The ear canal in a pig is smaller around than a pencil eraserIt's a figure of speech. The point was to aim for the ear area where the skull is relatively thin and doesn't slope heavily.

Having said that - I should point out that I am not a headshot kinda guy, and would bring enough gun to punch thru the rib plating on the largest hog imaginable.

Hook686
March 15, 2008, 06:18 PM
If your only choice was between the .223 and a M1 Carbine (.308 as suggested by some) with 110 grain JSP, or a .41 magnum revolver, which, if any of them, would you pick ?

saddlebum
March 15, 2008, 06:24 PM
i've kilt a bus load of hogs with a 41mag blackhawk

TCB in TN
March 15, 2008, 06:25 PM
If your only choice was between the .223 and a M1 Carbine (.308 as suggested by some) with 110 grain JSP, or a .41 magnum revolver, which, if any of them, would you pick ?

.308 any day.

saddlebum
March 15, 2008, 06:29 PM
yea, but he's talking about a 30 carbine not 308 win. i shot a 140lb pig 4 times behind the shoulder with a 30 carbine. i wasn't impressed and neither was the pig

H&Hhunter
March 16, 2008, 03:33 AM
There is no ammo in a .223 that makes into a reliable hog killer under normal field conditions.

Period end of story.

Remember I said reliable not one that is capable of killing a hog. The .223 is certainly capable of killing any hog on the planet with perfect shot presentation and perfect shot placement.

Rarely do you get either in real life hunting situations.

MCgunner
March 16, 2008, 12:28 PM
If your only choice was between the .223 and a M1 Carbine (.308 as suggested by some) with 110 grain JSP, or a .41 magnum revolver, which, if any of them, would you pick ?

.41 mag without hesitation. Or, sell the .223 and buy a .308. :D I'd say sell the carbine, only slightly more "pop gun" than the .223, but I sorta like those little carbines. I just don't care for ARs at all. Never got bit by the GI Joe bug and I'm old enough to remember the TV show "Combat".

BullsEye10x
March 16, 2008, 12:51 PM
I once dropped a 150 pound sow with a single shot to the neck from a 22-250. It was loaded with 55 grain Hornady Ballistic tips. She came out of nowhere with several piglets in tow and ran broadside from me about 25 yards away; I had my rifle slung at the time and was not expecting it. Had just enough time to get a flash sight picture in the scope and let one go. I fired as she was running over a ridge and thought I missed, but when I came over the top she was down about 10 feet from where I shot, dead before she hit the ground. That nasty little bullet exploded in her neck and severed the spinal cord. I got to thinking if I had hit her somewhere else it might have been a different outome, so now I don't take anything smaller than a 30-30 or 30-06 into hog country. Not to mention the HUGE tracks I've seen out there lately that have to be a few 300+ pounders :eek:

MCgunner
March 16, 2008, 01:02 PM
A 150 lbs pig is one thing, not much in the way of gristle plate, yet. A 350 lb boar, if you wanna shoot it (not me, LOL, I shoot to eat), is a horse of a different color. A .22 centerfire will kill a small hog fine. The big bruisers that guys call "trophies" are quite a bit harder to penetrate.

.30-30 with a 170 grain bullet or a Nosler 160 is enough. It don't take a cannon, just that those little varmint bullets ain't the ticket. I've seen a 7mm 150 grain game king from a 7 mag fail to exit a big hog. A 160 partition or some heavy or controlled expansion bullet is best, even in a belted magnum. It's about the bullet. You have to have enough bullet on the big'ns.

tsanford405
March 17, 2008, 01:34 AM
Well I plan on taking my 7 mag for certain. I have some pretty hot 160 grain nosler partitions that should put just about anything down. I was basically trying to decide a good brush gun for the day time. My considerations would be the following: 7 mag with a 3x9 scope on it, open site saiga-12 with slugs, ar-15 with eotech, or a ruger redhawk 44 mag! One of these HAS to be able to do the job lol. :uhoh: The only hog hunt I have done in Texas involved a blind and the pitch black, and then dogs and knifes. This time around the night hunting will be the same, but during the day there will be "stalking." I am not certain how will this will work, but I guess we will find out. For the $$$, it better work alright!:what:

Rnelson
March 17, 2008, 02:27 AM
My personal favorite for hogs is 00Buck. Only problem is getting that close to use it. When you do its always a fun experience..

qajaq59
March 17, 2008, 08:22 AM
If the choice is only between those 2 rifles I think I'd go with the 7mm. The other would be ok if you were sitting down, had a rest, and the hog would stand still for a while. But you just know that isn't going to happen very often. And following a wounded hog into the heavy palmetto isn't my idea of fun. "Bang/Flop" is the only way to go with hogs.

MCgunner
March 17, 2008, 11:54 AM
Well I plan on taking my 7 mag for certain. I have some pretty hot 160 grain nosler partitions that should put just about anything down. I was basically trying to decide a good brush gun for the day time. My considerations would be the following: 7 mag with a 3x9 scope on it, open site saiga-12 with slugs, ar-15 with eotech, or a ruger redhawk 44 mag! One of these HAS to be able to do the job lol. The only hog hunt I have done in Texas involved a blind and the pitch black, and then dogs and knifes. This time around the night hunting will be the same, but during the day there will be "stalking." I am not certain how will this will work, but I guess we will find out. For the $$$, it better work alright!

At close range, that Saiga with slugs (if it's accurate out to 50 yards, will be all you need. I'd hunt with the 7 regardless. However, the Saiga might be better for kickin' 'em out of cover where that's SOP. I've hunted where you just walk along checking the cover for 'em bedded up in there. The shot will be on the run when it comes if you don't shoot 'em before they move. You might even put a buck shot load up front in that thing. Might be ideal for such conditions. I've often thought the Saiga might have applications in hunting, this is one such instance. I mean, nothing I couldn't do with any of my shotguns, but if you like Saigas......

rr2241tx
March 18, 2008, 04:34 PM
55 gr UMC FMJ cheap yellow box .223 have probably killed more hogs than anything other than .22WRM in Texas. You do have to aim. You need to be reasonably close. 7mm RM will ruin more meat than you get to eat and most probably blow stomach contents everywhere unless it's a head shot. That and 7mmRM are $2+ each and .223 are a quarter each. You decide.

dtalley
March 18, 2008, 05:22 PM
+1 what rr2241tx said. I have killed 175 pounds and less hogs with one shot from an .223 AR using 55gr. FMJ. I have seen one run off after one shot behind the head and one behind the shoulder with a .204 though.

hacksaw
March 18, 2008, 08:46 PM
Why not get a new upper for the AR?? Chamber it in 6.8 spc or go crazy and get it in .50 Beowulf! I promise you, this little piggy will drop with the .50!

If you enjoyed reading about "Any .223 Rounds hit hard enough to take out hog hunting?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!