AR Double Tapping?


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sscoyote
March 15, 2008, 01:35 AM
Why does this occur guys, and how can it be fixed?

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taliv
March 15, 2008, 01:41 AM
well, when you pull the trigger twice, having only aligned the sights and target once, it happens.

it's not a bug, it's a feature :)

BorisDaBastid
March 15, 2008, 08:09 AM
"well, when you pull the trigger twice, having only aligned the sights and target once, it happens."

smartalek ;)

Double tapping is a handy way of making sure your target is....dead.


Double feeding however, is the result of the magazine separating slightly on the back weld, causing the bolt to push two rounds into the chamber. This can be fixed by *not* banging your mags on anything hard to "seat" the rounds. If you feel rounds need to be seated, smack the mag against the palm of your hand.

crux
March 15, 2008, 08:12 AM
I assume you mean: 1 pull = 2 shots?

A new hammer spring fixed mine, it would only do it with heavier recoiling stuff, warm 75s and 77s.

sscoyote
March 15, 2008, 12:43 PM
That's it Crux--i'll check that out, I appreciate that info.

rcmodel
March 15, 2008, 12:50 PM
It's called doubling.
It can also be caused by a slam-fire if you are using commercial .223 ammo with soft primers.
Or reloads with crushed primer cups.

The floating firing pin will always dimple the primer of the round as it loads into the chamber.
GI primers are harder and will not go of from that light dimpling.

Softer commercial .223 primers, or damaged ones may, and if so, you get two shots real fast with one trigger pull.

rcmodel

Bartholomew Roberts
March 15, 2008, 01:34 PM
Doubling usually indicates a problem in your fire control group. A common cause is also wear at the nose of the trigger where is catches the hammer or wear on the hammer at the opposite spot.

Typically you see that kind of wear if the trigger is really old or someone tried to polish the trigger to get a better trigger pull and polished right through the very thin case hardening on the trigger.

It is an unsafe condition though and you need to get it fixed as soon as possible.

ken grant
March 15, 2008, 01:52 PM
Sometimes it is the trigger finger!!!!

hankdatank1362
March 15, 2008, 01:56 PM
It can land you time at Club Fed if the wrong people happen to see it happen... check out the ongoing saga in the Legal forum.

Coronach
March 15, 2008, 02:29 PM
Are you shooting this from a rest? You can, essentially, bump fire the gun if you're not careful when shooting from a rest.

Mike

Float Pilot
March 15, 2008, 02:57 PM
Before I retired from Uncle Sam 18 months ago, we had this occasionally happen with rebuild M16A2s that were all parts guns. Usually it was because the hammer-spring needed changing, OR occasionally (about 3 times a year) it was because the legs on the springs had not been properly installed on top of the lower receiver pins. As you know, the spring pressure from the legs of the internal spings is what holds the receiver thru-pins in place. Every now and then somebody would assemble a rifle with only one leg on the top of the pin or neither leg. This either made the spring sit canted, which caused problems, or it let the pin walk sideways after a few rounds. So the hammer (usually) would cant at an angle because the pin walked out on one side. When that happens (most of the time) it goes double or full auto a few times before finally jamming up. We had one guy who thought it was supposed to do that actually make expert on his rifle qual with a rifle that autoed every round in the mag.

rooter
March 16, 2008, 02:34 AM
It can also be caused when the spring is put in upside down.

Bullet
March 16, 2008, 02:39 AM
Coronach
Are you shooting this from a rest? You can, essentially, bump fire the gun if you're not careful when shooting from a rest.

I believe Iíve done that.

Coronach
March 16, 2008, 03:00 AM
Yep. Guilty here, too.

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