Gun Oil Question


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Dynasty
March 22, 2008, 02:07 AM
I know there are many gun lubricating products out there ranging from motor oil to transmission fluid to chain saw oil to even olive oil! Of course there are the gun specific lubricants as well. With so many options out there...it got me thinking. Is there such thing as a bad lubricant on the market? Has anyone had a gun problem/failure due to the lubricant used? Anyone hear of a story or experienced something dealing with the lubricant used was the cause of a problem?

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biggiesmalls
March 22, 2008, 02:25 AM
imo an undesirable oil to put in your gun would be a food based oil or an oil that's too thick.

Rob G
March 22, 2008, 03:21 AM
I'm going to vote against any lubricant that has anything to do with the following:
1. Internal combustion engines
2. Transmissions
3. Stir Fry

But on a more serious note I don't believe I've ever heard of anyone using a "gun specific" lubricant that has had a problem with it. Generally their problems come from: not using enough of it, using it infrequently. Personally I've been using Hoppes for about a decade now but I'd be curious to know if there's something that really is better.

Ifishsum
March 22, 2008, 03:54 AM
Actually food-based oils are appropriate for black powder firearms, because any type of petroleum based oil turns to a tar that's very hard to clean up when mixed with black powder residue. My cap and ball revolvers get extra virgin olive oil and it's a very good lubricant.

For my modern firearms, Remoil or Hoppes oil works just fine for me. Stay away from WD-40, it's a very poor lubricant. I also had some oil on my shotgun once that got real gummy after less than a year and made it hard to work the action, but I don't remember exactly what it was.

Hk91-762mm
March 22, 2008, 04:00 AM
Sorry I'm not going to be much help,
I mostly use trans fluid -That stuff is great it will dissolve most residue and will penetrate rust,Most of my guns are Military surplus and it will turn brown as it sucks the dirt and rust out of some old Guns .
One thing about Gun oils ---I think they are made to lubricate the GUN OWNER as much as the guns themselves--[OOOhhhh Look At this super fortified extra molecule Silicone enhanced Super slippery stuff] and its only 10$ a 4oz bottle.
Maby you could try==ASTROGLIDE!

Ifishsum
March 22, 2008, 04:33 AM
One thing about Gun oils ---I think they are made to lubricate the GUN OWNER as much as the guns themselves--[OOOhhhh Look At this super fortified extra molecule Silicone enhanced Super slippery stuff] and its only 10$ a 4oz bottle.
Maby you could try==ASTROGLIDE!

LOL Now that's funny right there, I don't care who you are.

DWARREN123
March 22, 2008, 04:38 AM
I think EEZOX and STEEL SHIELD are 2 of the better lubricants for firearms. They protect, lube and clean somewhat.
I have found that many folk lubricate too much and in the wrong locations with the improper type of lubricant. A small bottle of lube should last a good while for one firearm.

buttrap
March 22, 2008, 06:17 AM
Best oil you can get is sperm whale oil its not PC now but thats why 150 year old wind up 26 jewel tic tocks still work.

CajunBass
March 22, 2008, 06:53 AM
I generally use some stuff called "gun oil."

I suppose most anything would do in a pinch though.

jkingrph
March 22, 2008, 10:00 AM
With the velocity of parts in a modern internal combustion engine, and pressures involved the oils used must be good.

I like Mobil 1, weight is not really important and a quart costs about the same as a small (1-2oz) bottle of gun oil. Key word is oil.

JaxNovice
March 22, 2008, 10:03 AM
My wife insists that I use KY. Wait are we talking about gun oil?

ranger335v
March 22, 2008, 10:13 AM
"Of course there are the gun specific lubricants as well."

The cost of refining oils for specific purposes forbids anyone make the small quanities of oils shooters need. We only get something made for larger purposes that have been relabeled and sold at much higher costs than can be justified only because we - or many of us - are willing to pay for what is thought to be a special oil for guns. Just not so.

As mentioned above, sperm whale oil was the finest "gun oil" ever avaliable but it's own success doomed it. The original sperm oils were not only used in clocks and watches and guns and other fine machines, it was the original auto transmission fluid. The needs quickly exceed the supply so a substitue was developed and that substitute is also perhaps the finest light gun oil available at any price, it's just Auto Transmission Fluid (ATF). It has good film strength, good resistance to heat and cold, good lubricity and does not dry to leave a gummy film on the surfaces.

ATF is the main ingrediant in the excellant "Ed's Red" all-around gun oil and bore cleaner. Ed found that a mixture of ATF, oderless mineral spirits and a couple of other trace ingrediants like acetone works really well. I just use straight ATF, prefer the synthetic type but it really doesn't seem to matter.
You can pay more but you can't get a better gun oil.

Jax, try a bit of K-Y as case lube, you will be surprised. I though if it helped insertion with one situation it might with another. It worked pretty well.

The Swede
March 22, 2008, 10:57 AM
Vegetable oil is not a good lubricant for firearms. After a while, maybe 2 weeks to a month, it will turn very sticky almost like glue.

Slugless
March 22, 2008, 01:42 PM
I work for an oil company.

It is correct to say that companies don't refine gun oils. In most cases they are not, however, simply relabeled. Oils are blended from refined feedstocks and additives for specific purposes.

The conditions and lubricating requirements of engines and transmissions are different than those of guns. That doesn't mean motor oil and ATF won't work for a firearm but they are not designed for that purpose.

YMMV. (pun intended)

totoro
March 22, 2008, 01:57 PM
Corrosion X products

scrat
March 22, 2008, 02:17 PM
gun oil in centerfires, rimfires shotguns. Olive oil in black powder. Black powder guns get used frequently so there is not worry about oil turning to sludge. Even the inside of chambers and barrels are coated with oil. Just use alcohol patches to remove oil prior to use.

Gun Slinger
March 22, 2008, 09:19 PM
I have been using Mobil 1 20w50 (VTWIN) in all of my rifles, pistols and shotguns for years without any issues.

I use it not for the fact that it is significantly cheaper than the gun specific products, but that it is without a doubt the best lubricant that I have ever used in every aspect of it's performance and application as a 'gun lubricant', bar none.

That it is so much less expensive than the vast multitude of 'gun specific' "wonderlubes" available is simply "icing on the cake".

Not to mention that it is also suitable for use with black powder/muzzleloaders.

aerod1
March 22, 2008, 09:35 PM
I have been using Hoppe's Solvent and Hoppe's Gun Oil for years and have never had a problem.

Bezoar
March 22, 2008, 10:15 PM
their is NO all purpose gun oil. SOME products come close, but the oil or lubricant that keeps your gun running fine in the desert during a sandstorm shoot out, is not normally the product to use while hunting bear in alaska when its 20 below.

The thing about lubricants is that they will all tend to dry and gum up after awhile. As they are intended to be used as part of a correct regimine of gun maintenance,
ie clean the gun every few weeks and keep it squeaky. Although cleaning and lubing it, and throwing it in the trunk for 5 years can work in some situations, itsbest to check your gun alot.

foreveryoung001
March 22, 2008, 11:05 PM
I was a little hesitant to try mobile-1 but now I am never going back to anything else. It is the best stuff I have ever used on my firearms, from my 1911 to my AR and everything in between. The stuff never dries out, never gums up, coats everything perfectly, and makes every moving part work more smoothly.

I never had any problems with any of the gun specific oils, and I've used a bunch of different one's over the years, but once I tried Mobile-1, I become hooked.

Halo
March 22, 2008, 11:12 PM
I'm another advocate of synthetic motor oil. I've used Mobil 1 for years on all my firearms and noted all the same benefits as the previous poster. Recently I started using Amsoil synthetic oil and it's also been great. I recommend using it with a precision oiler, like the one made by Dewey's. It allows for pinpoint application of oil.

Gun Slinger
March 22, 2008, 11:25 PM
Those little 1/2 oz. HDPE needle oilers from Brownell's that come three to a pack are wonderful for putting a small drop of M1 wherever you want it since a little M1 goes a long way.

:)

19-3Ben
March 23, 2008, 12:23 AM
I use Amsoil 10-w30. Fantastic stuff. I used to use Remoil, which is ok, but I found that most gun oils run off/evaporate, or go somewhere. Where? I dunno. they are probably hanging out with the socks from the drier, or that extra $5 bill you swear you had in your pocket.
Maybe they are all having party.

Gun Slinger
March 23, 2008, 12:29 AM
19-3Ben,

If you check the M.S.D.S. for RemOil, you will find that it is 55% solvent per the materials section and that is why it tends to disappear so quickly.

I have no idea as to the 'whereabouts' of your missing sock and the five dollar bill though...:D

Good luck.

Clean97GTI
March 23, 2008, 12:58 AM
I have used Markal E-Z Break copper grade anti-seize compound/lubricant on the slides and running surfaces of my semi auto firearms for a number of years now. A little goes a long way and it stays where you put it and remains there for a long time.
The best part is that it doesn't really attract dust and dirt unless you put way too much on. It also tolerates heat very well and is easy to remove with a simple solvent. It does leave a residue on certain finishes if you aren't careful requiring the use of a solvent on those finishes to get it off. In other words, be careful and apply sparingly.

Indifferent
March 23, 2008, 02:38 AM
I use a silicon oil from Radio Shack, it takes extreme heat, it doesn't run, its cheap, it slippery, its sticky, its the right thickness, it has a needle applicator to pin point the lubing.

strat81
March 23, 2008, 07:27 PM
NAPA Lithium Grease and Breakfree CLP are what I'm using currently in everything from a Glock, to a M1 Garand, to an AR-15, to a 1911.

I've considered a bit of motor oil or tranny fluid but why change if everything works?

Nate C.
March 23, 2008, 08:12 PM
Rem Oil or Hoppe's. I like the smell of both. I have been accused of using it as a cologne. This I deny.

CZcanuck
March 23, 2008, 08:13 PM
Lithium Grease is what a few people i know use, from glocks to AR-15's to a CZ 858 never had an issue. But reading all the mobil 1 talk, i might give it a try on some of the "not, so" expensive weapons.

razz
April 19, 2008, 01:02 AM
I also use Mobile 1 synthetic and they never dry up.

USMC 1975
April 19, 2008, 08:44 AM
" I was a little hesitant to try mobile-1 but now I am never going back to anything else. It is the best stuff I have ever used on my firearms, from my 1911 to my AR and everything in between. The stuff never dries out, never gums up, coats everything perfectly, and makes every moving part work more smoothly.

I never had any problems with any of the gun specific oils, and I've used a bunch of different one's over the years, but once I tried Mobile-1, I become hooked. "

I agree 100 %.

Mobil 1 is one of the best oils ever created by man.

Chris

sachmo
April 19, 2008, 02:00 PM
At one time or another Ive tried about all of them. I now use Mobile One. Firearm lubrication is really pretty basic and we tend to make a bigger deal out of it then it really is. Compared to many mechanical devices they are really pretty simple to lubricate.

OLD DOMENION
April 19, 2008, 02:07 PM
I use ED'S RED as a lubricant/oil
In case you don't know it is equal parts of:
VARSOL/Oil Based Paint Thinner
K-1 Kerosene
Dextron 2 or 3
It lasts about 12 months.

XD-40 Shooter
April 19, 2008, 03:01 PM
I use Breakfree CLP, its worked great for me. About every 300 rounds I'll field strip my guns, run hoppe's #9 through them, and then a light coat of CLP, I've had no issues.

If CLP is good enough for the Marines in the field, and that is what they use, then its good enough for me. The military has some pretty stringent requirements for gun lubes.

2nd 41
April 19, 2008, 03:11 PM
I have been using Hoppe's Solvent and Hoppe's Gun Oil for years and have never had a problem.
Why look past this. Stop here.
And some Breakfree or Tri-Flow if I need to get into a certain area

Kentak
April 19, 2008, 03:21 PM
IMO, it's silly to worry about the few cents worth of gun-specific lubricants that are used after each shooting session when that very same shooting session will cost as much as gallons of the stuff when you factor in ammo, gas costs to get to the range, range fees, etc.

I'll use the gun-specific lubes and not give it a second thought. A little bottle will last me for months. If you want a cheap hobby, guns and shooting isn't it.

In an emergency, sure, use any medium or light oil made to lubricate mechanisms of just about any kind. The less than perfect oil is almost certainly better than no oil at all.

K

WayneConrad
April 19, 2008, 11:27 PM
I use ED'S RED as a lubricant/oil

You can use Ed's Red for oil, I suppose, but I was taught by the recipe on this page (http://home.comcast.net/~dsmjd/tux/dsmjd/tech/eds_red.htm) to use just two of the components of Ed's Red for light gun oil: The ATF III (automatic transmission fluid) and the heating kerosene. Leave out the acetone and the odorless mineral spirits.

sfhogman
April 20, 2008, 12:45 AM
From Grant Cunningham, revolversmith:
http://www.grantcunningham.com/lubricants101.html

Ala Dan
April 20, 2008, 12:59 AM
WD-40 = BAD NEWS~! could and probably would penetrate
primer pockets~! :scrutiny: :eek: :(

blkbrd666
April 20, 2008, 01:34 AM
I usually use Rem-Oil in an aerosol can to clean guns after shooting and keep a small squeeze bottle of Rem-Oil with a 2" yellow tube in a Ziploc bag in the range bag. For the absolute slickest and quietest action, I use Finish Line Synthetic Century Lubricant on the high speed moving parts of a gun, slide rails, etc. It's an ultra-refined petroleum oil reacted with hydrogen gasses to produce a "pure" oil where every molecule is identical. It's about the viscosity of Hoppes gun oil but it doesn't sling or creep...even if you wipe it, the surface stays slicker than...well, hooter-poo. It's specifically designed to stay on a racing bicycle chain and not on the back of your leg. It's expensive, but so are my guns. In some of my guns it actually changes the sound of the slide racking as if it is floating.

John828
April 20, 2008, 09:13 AM
WD-40 = BAD NEWS~! could and probably would penetrate primer pockets~!

Yep, any penetrating oil is bad news.

I use Hoppes to clean and syn. motor oil to lube.

Mousegun
April 20, 2008, 09:26 AM
Molybdenum paste. It is as thick as most greases and never goes away like oils do.

Gun Geezer
April 20, 2008, 10:19 AM
WD-40 = BAD NEWS~! could and probably would penetrate
primer pockets~!
__________________

WD40 has it's use and purpose, but it is NOT to be used on guns.

Close friend finally decided to get a shotgun. Brand new 1100. Shot it a few times that fall and asked me what to lube it up with for the winter. I told him but he decided to use WD40 instead. He "oiled" the action and all metal parts with the stuff.

The next spring (3 to 4 months later), his took the shotgun out of it's soft case for a day at the range. It was covered in rust and the action would barely function! I could not resist an "I told you so".

I use CLP. Great stuff. A gun smith I live near ran a test with 15 to 20 different comercially available lubes. He cleaned and degreased some iron nails and then coated each thouroughly with the various lubes. Then he put them in mason jars and filled 1/2 way with water. Nails are long enough to stick 1/2 way out of the water. Big nails. He puts the lids on and sets the jars on a shelf.

2-months later, the CLP nail and one other were still rust free. Wish I could remember then other lube that worked so well.

bamacisa
April 20, 2008, 03:30 PM
I use Breakfree and LSA...if it is good enough for Uncle Sam, it is good enough for me. Generally speaking nearly all gun oils and gun lubricants work okey. That is not to say that they are all equal and that they are all the same. Navy Seals have been known to use FP10. A dentist once told me that the most important thing about cleaning teeth was brushing, not what brand of tooth paste that you use. The same thing applies to firearms, the most important thing is to clean oil and lubrlcate with a product made for that purpose. (as opposed to doing nothing) The Army says in an emergency that you can use SAE 10 motor oil. ( I don't recommend that)

Rampant_Colt
April 20, 2008, 04:41 PM
Mobil 1

I've been using motor oil on my firearms for over 20 years. WD-40 for over 30 years. WD-40 is not recommended for long-term storage though


Here's the link to Ed's Red Bore Cleaner (http://home.comcast.net/~dsmjd/tux/dsmjd/tech/eds_red.htm), Hoppe's is very similar, and uses automotive lubricants as well.

Top engine cleaner works well as a bore cleaner

ETA - i see duped Wayne Conrad

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