4 pounds powder = x bullets


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Shinken
March 28, 2008, 12:00 AM
I am a beginner reloader and am tickled pink to be getting my reloading equipment tomorrow. I will be exclusively reloading for a 9mm Sig P226 pistol. I think I will be buying "Alliant Power Pistol" powder for now, as I read it is good stuff. Someone please give me an idea about how many bullets a 1# powder supply will create. I know this will be an approximate value :)

CC

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CBS220
March 28, 2008, 12:06 AM
Several thousand.

7000 grains to a pound, roughly.

You have ~28000 grains. I don't know what load you want.

lives4huntin
March 28, 2008, 12:07 AM
One pound of powder is about 7,000 grains according to my RCBS scale. 437.5 grains equals one ounce. At a max of eight grains per case, about 875 rounds could be loaded.

Shinken
March 28, 2008, 12:11 AM
Aha! The 7000 grains to a pound (approx.) is very helpful data. So let me see if I get this right... if I am reloading for 115 grains, and I have 1 pound of the powder, then simply:

7000/115 = 60 bullets

Is this right? WAIT, WAIT... let me review my books... be right back :)

OK, the 7000/115=60 seems off. If I am reloading for a 115 grain/1100 FPS, then book says 5.6 grain... so is it really 7000/5.6=1250 bullets?

CC

lives4huntin
March 28, 2008, 12:15 AM
I think that you are looking at the bullet weight. My books show an average powder charge of about 5.5 grains.

Shinken
March 28, 2008, 12:16 AM
Yeah, I think I edited my message with correct(?) data.

CC

TAB
March 28, 2008, 12:16 AM
Aha! The 7000 grains to a pound (approx.) is very helpful data. So let me see if I get this right... if I am reloading for 115 grains, and I have 1 pound of the powder, then simply:

7000/115 = 60 bullets

Is this right? WAIT, WAIT... let me review my books... be right back


no thats how much your bullets weight... your powder charges will be in the 5 grain range. so you should get some where in the 1200-1500 range.

lives4huntin
March 28, 2008, 12:17 AM
First time reloding?

zxcvbob
March 28, 2008, 12:22 AM
Sixty 115 grain bullets weighs about a pound. That's not a very useful calculation unless you are melting a pound of lead and casting your own bullets. ;)

If you use 7.0 grains of powder per cartridge, you can load 1000 cartridges from a pound of powder.

Power Pistol is good stuff, but Bullseye is more efficient in 9mm and might be a better choice -- unless you are going for absolute maximum power and don't care if you waste a little powder. With those light bullets, 5.5 grains of Bullseye will give you better performance than 7 grains of Power Pistol, but you can still go higher with the Power Pistol where the Bullseye is topped out.

Shinken
March 28, 2008, 12:22 AM
First time reloding?

Yes sir. Actually a complete beginner. Bought about 6 books and learning everything from scratch.

Power Pistol is good stuff, but Bullseye is more efficient in 9mm and might be a better choice --

Thanks for the recommendation zxcvbob, that is exactly what I am looking for :) I see that Bullseye is 4.4 gr. for the 115 grain bullets @ 1100 fps (vs. 5.6 for Power Pistol).

CC

lives4huntin
March 28, 2008, 12:31 AM
Have fun, take your time, double check everything. And most importantly, enjoy the your first loaded round that you shoot. Mine was a huge rush. Knowing what just happend, and you are the reason it happened.

ArchAngelCD
March 28, 2008, 01:34 AM
If I don't spill any of the powder I can load 2,000 .38 Special target rounds with 1 lb of W231. Since I just bought a 8 lb jug of W231 I'm set for the next 16,000 rounds. Now if I could only afford 16,000 bullets (and primers) I'll be doing fine!! LOL

Floppy_D
March 28, 2008, 07:07 AM
You probably knew this, but before you settle on one load, make 50 or so and take them to the range. You don't want to have 500 loaded and crimped bullets that won't cycle your gun. (Go ahead, ask me how I know)

71Commander
March 28, 2008, 07:55 AM
I use 4.0 Bullseye W/ a 115 gr Precision. It's a good load.

http://www.precisionbullets.com/home.htm

If you don't have one, get a Lee factory crimp die. I have one for all pistol calibers I load for.

scrat
March 28, 2008, 10:32 AM
if you want to get more out of reloading. Stop counting bullets. its been done too many times people keep track of how many bullets they can make out of a pound. then when they come out short they are steaming. i guess the powder settles over time. This and the occasional oops i spilled some all adds up. in the end you will find yourself short. If your reloading because of money and only because of money you will not be happy. now if your reloading for the experience, for the know how and to get quality ammo then your on the right track. Later on maybe 10-20 years from now if the brady people ever get there way and bullets are numbered. Those who cast and load there own will be very grateful for being able to make there own ammo. Im sure at this point of time too every reloader and caster will be making about 3 bullets to the penny.

fireflyfather
March 28, 2008, 03:04 PM
Im sure at this point of time too every reloader and caster will be making about 3 bullets to the penny.

Um, have you seen the price of lead recently? Even tire shops are selling it these days, instead of giving it away free. My cost is about 1.5 cents per bullet, and I'm happy at that. Commercial lead bullets are about 6 cents, jacketed about 10-13 cents each. Add in 2 or 3 cents for a primer, 1 to 3 cents for powder, and it isn't cheap, even for the average reloader.

Just make sure when you look at your load data that you charge it with the powder weight (about 3-10 grains) worth of powder, not the bullet weight, or you will have a mess of overflowing powder spilled on your bench.

fireflyfather
March 28, 2008, 03:17 PM
4 lbs of Bullseye will get you about 5,500 rounds worth of powder,
Power Pistol will get you about 4,000.

Since the powders are basically the same price by weight, the bullseye is a better value by far. If you really want to get cheap, and can buy 8lbs at a time, buy Red Dot or, even better, Promo. 4.5 grain charge, and MUCH cheaper. Promo is about half the cost per round vs power pistol, and the alliant load data online puts the velocity within about 10%. Only 30fps less than bullseye.

amlevin
March 28, 2008, 03:29 PM
The only time I count bullets is when I am getting ready to load a batch of either 9mm or .223, both of which I shoot a lot. For 9mm I figure 1# of powder for each 1,000 rounds (approsimately) and 4# of powder for each 1,000 of .223's. This is only so I know how much powder to have on hand before I start my session. For specialty loads and other calibers I only load 100 or so at a session and I use a variety of different powders so a pound here and a pound there is all I need.

For 9mm I have been very happy with HS-6, Power Pistol, and VV 3N37. Hate Unique and 231. Won't use Red Dot again on a bet. Tired of looking like I was mining coal after a session at the range. But then again was it the powder or the 500+ rounds I shot.;)

Steve C
March 28, 2008, 07:12 PM
Powder charge for a 115gr bullet in the 9mm with power pistol should be between 6.1 (start load) and 6.7grains (max). depending upon where you stop increasing your load will determine the total number of rounds per lb of powder but including some spillage you will get over 1,000 rounds of ammo out of one lb of Power Pistol using 115gr bullets so 4lbs will load over 4,000 rounds.

FieroCDSP
March 28, 2008, 11:52 PM
I shot through a bunch of Bullseye loads last week. Great stuff. I love the flash it cranked out of my Cougar. Even with the stall light on and my muzzle past the partitions I could see the flash off the partition. I'd like to get a few picts of it. For certain Bullseye is louder than most of the powders I use.

Pumpkinheaver
March 30, 2008, 09:32 AM
I get 2000 rounds of .38spl from a pound of bullseye. Divide 7000 by the pwder charge your gonna use. That will give you loads per pound of powder.

brickeyee
March 30, 2008, 09:58 AM
The 7000 grains to a pound (approx.) is very helpful data.

No approximation about it, a pound IS 7000 grains.

Rustynuts
March 30, 2008, 03:00 PM
Anyone have a pic of that 115gr powder pistol brass? I think that would hurt a little to shoot! :what: :D

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