Advantage of TiN carrier and bolt over chrome?


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Guitargod1985
April 4, 2008, 12:56 AM
Just as the title says, what advantage does a titanium nitride bolt and carrier have over a a chrome plated bolt and carrier? Is it extra corrosion resistance? Increased resistance to erosion? I'm just trying to figure out if I should spend an extra $30 or so on my new bolt carrier group.

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Onmilo
April 4, 2008, 09:27 AM
It looks gold instead of silver,,,,,
I suppose if you were building a rifle in SOCOM desert tan the gold carrier would look better.

berettashotgun
April 4, 2008, 09:44 AM
If you don't mind me asking, where are you getting it from?
I think I NEED one.
Perfect excuse for building up another AR for the wife - of course.
She is an easy mark for anything "color-coordinated" or "matching".
My girl.:evil:

Onmilo
April 4, 2008, 09:53 AM
Look here;
http://www.dpmsinc.com
or here;
http://www.brownells.com

gunnie
April 4, 2008, 10:04 AM
the TiN finish would have a higher abrasion resistance than the chrome. not sure if the titanium would have the same "lubricity" qualities though. beyond that just a matter of personal preference.

gunnie

Guitargod1985
April 4, 2008, 12:50 PM
If you don't mind me asking, where are you getting it from?

I'm looking to get one from Delton.

Badger Arms
April 4, 2008, 01:08 PM
Steel is harder than Aluminum, right? With a bolt carrier, it's bare steel against anodized aluminum. The Bolt carrier itself doesn't need any special coating. Heck, it used to be chrome plated (AR-15 and M16 Air Force models) and they decided that was overkill and went to parkerizing. We've got carriers from the 60's that have been used in training weapons almost continually since that time without wearing out, you AIN'T going to wear out yours. If you have a TiN barrel extension, TiN bolt, carrier, cam pin, and gas tube, the only appreciable difference you'll EVER see is one of... COLOR!

Now then, TiN is not easy to apply as it's vapor deposited so it tends not to get into tight areas or holes well. Mirror-bright Chrome is the way I would go if I had the choice between Chrome or Titanium Nitride. Actually, TiCN or Titanium Carbo-Nitride (Black) is the way I'd go. Again, it'd have to be mirror finish. Me... I chose Parkerized 'cause of the cost/benefit... it isn't worth the extra money for looks.

Onmilo
April 4, 2008, 01:27 PM
If this matters,
I actually prefer titanium carbo-nitride coated cutter inserts over the standard titanium nitride coated versions.
The black inserts stand up much better to high speed cnc in hard steel without wearing the coating down to the carbide.
They also seem to be much more resistant to chipping when the coating does wear down.
More cycles= fewer insert replacements.
Good stuff.

Guitargod1985
April 4, 2008, 02:09 PM
Thanks for all of the input guys.

redsaber75
April 4, 2008, 02:15 PM
Titanium is a fairly reactive metal.

Don't do it unless you like the bolt fusing to a hot cartridge case...

rr2241tx
April 4, 2008, 02:22 PM
As long as you're PIMPing your gun, don't forget the pearl pistol grips.

strat81
April 4, 2008, 02:25 PM
Seems like some of the better BCGs you can get these days are the BCM units from Bravo and Global Tactical. MPIed, HPTed, shot-peened, properly staked, and have the upgraded extractor spring.

I think the gold looks a bit gaudy on a black gun. I'd go for chrome for ease of cleaning, but the parked carriers are fine too. I'm probably putting at least a BCM bolt in the build/assembly I'm working on now. Very excellent rep and not much $$$.

Guitargod1985
April 4, 2008, 02:38 PM
As long as you're PIMPing your gun, don't forget the pearl pistol grips.


LOL - you got it. Nah seriously though, I'm just going to stick with a chrome BCG.

the naked prophet
April 4, 2008, 03:26 PM
Titanium is a fairly reactive metal.

Don't do it unless you like the bolt fusing to a hot cartridge case.

But carbides and nitrides are typically very non-reactive, which is why they are used in coatings and such. The more reactive a metal is, the stronger and less reactive its nitrides, carbides, and oxides will be.

highorder
April 4, 2008, 04:21 PM
Quote:
Titanium is a fairly reactive metal.
Don't do it unless you like the bolt fusing to a hot cartridge case.



But carbides and nitrides are typically very non-reactive, which is why they are used in coatings and such. The more reactive a metal is, the stronger and less reactive its nitrides, carbides, and oxides will be.


THANK YOU. I was about to post the same thing. The wouldn't TiN Carriers and bolts if that was the case.


If this matters,
I actually prefer titanium carbo-nitride coated cutter inserts over the standard titanium nitride coated versions.
The black inserts stand up much better to high speed cnc in hard steel without wearing the coating down to the carbide.
They also seem to be much more resistant to chipping when the coating does wear down.
More cycles= fewer insert replacements.
Good stuff.

also, the higher chipping resistance is also a function of the thicker coating of TiAlCN and TiCN, for what its worth. :)

briansmithwins
April 4, 2008, 04:36 PM
I think the primary benefit is to the economy: By spending your $s on a over designed finish that's complete overkill for the given application, you help our favorite AR pimps stay in business. They have to pay people to handle your order, UPS has to have people deliver it...

Please buy all the TiN bolt carriers, bolts, firing pins, firing pin retaining pins, extractors, barrel extensions, front sights, and buffer tubes that you can. Help our economy! Do it for the children!

BSW

gunnie
April 4, 2008, 05:52 PM
THREAD ROBBER ALERT!!!


naked prophet,

when you get caught up on current orders, pls PM me for a double mag pouch order to match the retro looking full flap 1911 w/surefire X200 you built for me.....

thnx,
gunnie

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