Ok. how the heck do I clean my .22lr?


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Nightwing
April 7, 2008, 11:44 AM
First time cleaning a rifle. I read up really good, but it's a semi auto so I'm having a hard time. I can't just push a brush down the barrel, cause I have to pull it back too. Once those bristles are stuck pushing one way it's almost impossible to get them to come back the other way.
For the time being I ended up just dragging and rubbing some cleaning cloth patched all over the barrel to clean out residue, and did the best I could to clean out the action, and the loading tube.
Don't want to damage my gun with using an overly aggressive brush inside of it, but it is the proper size brush.
I dunno.
Not a ton of gun cleaning experience so I need to learn. Have been using my guns for a while with little or no cleaning. Time to get em purty again!

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glockman19
April 7, 2008, 11:46 AM
Bore Snake?

Nightwing
April 7, 2008, 11:48 AM
?2345

Halo
April 7, 2008, 11:57 AM
Do you have the action open? You should be able to get the brush all the way through the chamber with the action open. It sounds like the brush is running into the bolt while part of it is still in the bore, making it difficult to reverse directions.

Titan6
April 7, 2008, 11:58 AM
I can't just push a brush down the barrel, cause I have to pull it back too. Once those bristles are stuck pushing one way it's almost impossible to get them to come back the other way.

AHHH! Stop it!

Never reverse in the bore, it can damage your rifiling. You did not say what kind of gun you have so this is one time I would suggest getting out the owner's manual and reading it. There will be a section on cleaning. If you need another copy get on the net and track one down and/or write the manufacturer. They will send you one for free.

Bore snakes are a good idea for .22s.

Nightwing
April 7, 2008, 11:59 AM
Yeah the action is open, and it still is in the bore. Brush is too long, but is the shortest I could find.
I'm worried that it's too abrasive too and i will destroy the inside of my barrel. But I guess it's metal... a wire brush shouldn't hurt it. just use a little oil?

Nightwing
April 7, 2008, 12:01 PM
AHHH! Stop it!

Never reverse in the bore, it can damage your rifiling. You did not say what kind of gun you have so this is one time I would suggest getting out the owner's manual and reading it. There will be a section on cleaning. If you need another copy get on the net and track one down and/or write the manufacturer. They will send you one for free.

Bore snakes are a good idea for .22s.

that's what I mean! I don't wanna damage it! I don't want to have to get it stuck in there. did it once and will not try it again until the problem is solved.
I've read the instructions. Just can't get it all the way out of the bore!
It's a Marlin tube load.

strat81
April 7, 2008, 12:03 PM
A bronze or nylon gun brush should not hurt a steel barrel. A steel rod might, but brushes should not.

+1 on the boresnake. I rarely clean .22LR bores with anything more than a spray of CLP and two pulls of a boresnake. The action, feed ramp, slide, etc get cleaned with Hoppes #9 and CLP.

okiewita40
April 7, 2008, 12:07 PM
I just clean them like any other gun. an aluminum cleaning rod and a brass brush with some hoppes #9 on it won't hurt a thing. then the little .22 cal cleaning patches til they come out clean and then some breakfree clp to keep the rust at bay. Haven't messed up a .22 lr yet in 30 years. Then again i just shoot for min. of squirrel not benchrest accu.

waterhouse
April 7, 2008, 12:10 PM
+1 on boresnake. Great for .22s.

Halo
April 7, 2008, 12:17 PM
I'm guessing you tried a .22 pistol brush already? You could also try the newer Hoppes Tynex brushes. The bristles are a type of nylon and allow reversing direction.

CajunBass
April 7, 2008, 12:39 PM
Clean a 22? :confused:

Shoot some "Gunscrubber" in it (Make sure it's the type of gunscrubber that's safe for plastic parts. You never know where plastic will show up these days.) then use a Q-tip to clean out any "gunk" you can reach.

The barrel? Leave it alone. I haven't run a patch through a 22 barrel in years. I haven't seen a bit of problem. 22 bullets leave behind a lubricant of their own that protects the bore . Unless the accuracy of the gun goes away, just leave it alone.

jerkface11
April 7, 2008, 12:42 PM
NEVER brush the barrel on a .22!!!!!

Franco2shoot
April 7, 2008, 12:50 PM
I found a brass brush that's the length of a .22 and the way I get it down the bore of our .22 Henry is to open the action, put the rod down the barrel insert the brush and screw the rod into it then pull straight out. As others have said, its fairly unneccessary, needed only after 1000 rounds. Just swab with normal solven and cleaning patch after each shooting session.
KKKKFL

SlamFire1
April 7, 2008, 12:54 PM
I am going to assume that you have a Ruger 10/22 or equivalent. I did not see a description of the rifle you are using.

There is a lot to be said about not cleaning a .22LR bore, as long as there is not lumpy leading in the barrel. At some point, for a semi auto, you will have to clean the residue from the chamber.

I recently conducted some 100 yard tests with a Match .22LR, and it does take fouling shots to bring point of impact back to point of aim. Those .22LR bullets are coated in wax and leave a wax coating in the barrel. That really does not harm anything.

However, assuming you live in a humid area, cleaning out the fouling and leaving a light oil coat as a rust barrier is not a bad thing.

To clean a Ruger 10/22 you have to clean from the muzzle. I use a muzzle guide on my cleaning rod.

http://www.midwayusa.com/mediasvr.dll/highresimage?saleitemid=897218

If you do not use a muzzle guide you will rub out the end of your barrel.

I push a cleaning rod with bore brush all the way through the chamber. The brush leaves the chamber. You might want to put a paper towel back there to absorb solvent as it shakes off the brush. Then pull the rod and brush all the way out.

Of course, the bolt has to be retracted.


I use a nice Dewey one piece cleaning rod. The rod is longer by a couple of inches than the barrel.

http://www.midwayusa.com/mediasvr.dll/highresimage?saleitemid=841244

AR-15 Rep
April 7, 2008, 01:08 PM
What is the make and model of the rifle? Normally, run a patch through with solvent a couple times, then dry patches until they come out clean, put a light oil patch through a couple times.

rcmodel
April 7, 2008, 01:12 PM
What is the make and model of the rifle?+1

Sooner or later, with any .22 RF, you are going to have to take it apart to clean all the crap out of the action & trigger group.

Might as well find out how right now!

Tell us what it is and someone might be able to help you!

rcmodel

joshk-k
April 7, 2008, 01:23 PM
I use a bore snake fed through the open chamber and out through the end of the barrel. I use my hands to feed the rope into the gun so it doesn't mar the area into which it's being fed.

Josh

30Cal
April 7, 2008, 01:56 PM
Get a single piece rod (segmented rods are made for ruining barrels) and a muzzle guide. I don't clean .22 bores until accuracy drops off (which means 22 years and still haven't cleaned one).

Vityaz
April 7, 2008, 02:07 PM
He said it's a Marlin tube fed, for those of you wondering the type.

aka108
April 7, 2008, 03:17 PM
I would field strip the rifle to a point where the bolt is removed before cleaning the bore.

SlamFire1
April 7, 2008, 03:50 PM
Sooner or later, with any .22 RF, you are going to have to take it apart to clean all the crap out of the action & trigger group.

This is a true statement. I don't own a Marlin .22LR semi auto, but I found instructions for a Model 60 tube feed version. http://www.castbullet.com/misc/m60.htm

In time, you will have to remove the breech block and clean out the wax and lead particles. These blowback actions open up when there is still some pressure in the barrel. As such, powder residue, bullet wax, get blown back into the action. The wax will condense from vapor form into a solid entrapping powder and lead particles. While the stuff is basically harmless, it will gum up the action. Particularly in cold weather

The use of a decent solvent, alcohol, mineral spirits, rifle bore cleaner, will dissolve the wax and junk.

A very light coat of oil, rubbed in with an oily patch, is about the only lubrication you need in one of these semi auto’s. You will find that too much oil, and that wax tends to accumulate in the oil, gumming the action up sooner than without.

Don't forget to clean under the extractor hook.

WayneConrad
April 7, 2008, 05:19 PM
For a .22? Stop cleaning. Then shoot until the rifle tells you where you should clean. Then, clean just that part. It'll likely be: if a bolt gun, the bolt; if a semi or lever gun, the action.

If you gotta, now and then run a bore snake through it.

In the mean time, keep the outside wiped down with an oily rag so nothing rusts.

The bore, throat and crown of a .22 are easier to damage by cleaning than by shooting.

cracked butt
April 7, 2008, 06:42 PM
No need to clean the bore unless the gun is shooting erratically- then again it might shoot erratically if you previously damaged it while cleaning.

kingpin008
April 7, 2008, 07:34 PM
Count me as one of the "leave the bore alone" crowd. In my experience, .22 barrels don't get "dirty", as much as they get "seasoned". As long as there's no obvious obstructions or extremely heavy fouling, leave that sucker alone. As others said, it's sometimes necessary to scrub the chamber or action of a .22 to remove some carbon or other fouling, but even that should be a once-in-a-great-while kinda thing.

But if you do insist on cleaning the bore - as long as you're using a brass or nylon brush, and a plastic or aluminum rod, you'll be fine. Steel is stronger than all of those, and will scratch the brush/rod before the brush or rod scratches it.

WayneConrad
April 7, 2008, 07:49 PM
If you must use a cleaning rod, use one piece rods, not jointed rods. With a bore guide.

The outer layer of an aluminum rod is aluminum oxide, which is very hard. I'm not sure it's harmless to the bore.

But this is getting off track. If you just keep the rod out of your bore, it doesn't matter what kind it is. :)

dagger dog
April 7, 2008, 08:06 PM
Half the fun in owning a firearm is knowing how to take it apart and put it back together with no left over parts, and still have it function like it was designed.
I like my rimfires clean, I clean mine after every use, if it's shot it's cleaned . If it cost $50 used it gets the same treatment as my $800.00 centerfire.
Get yourself a take down guide and when you have the time practice diassemble and reassemble until it gets to be ingrained then it's not a problem.
The never reverse a brush is good info make sure you push it all the way through, the bore guide, if cleaning from the muzzle is good advice also. If you can't push the brush all the way through then dissamble the rifle.

.22 rimfire ammo is some of the dirtiest, all the lube on the lead bullets is spattered throughout the action, a good aerosol cleaner and a tooth or action brush is the ticket to a clean rifle.

The Beatles said" Happiness is a warm Gun ", They should have said
Happines is a CLEAN GUN!

TimboKhan
April 7, 2008, 08:19 PM
I don't think it's necessary to clean a 22 rifle all that often. Even the chamber needs to be cleaned only occasionally. Do what you want, but you really don't need to clean it that often, if ever.

AnthonyC.
April 7, 2008, 08:51 PM
I clean the action out occasionaly on my Remington 597 but other than that, I have put over 5,000 round through it and it is still as accurate if not more accurate than when I got it out of the box.

Upriver
April 7, 2008, 09:00 PM
I've got a tube fed Marlin model 60, and the only parts I clean are the bolt and trigger group, usually when when it gets to the point that it won't cycle reliably. Other than that I just wipe down the outside wtih CLP.

Guess that puts me in the "I don't clean the barrel" group.

I'm a little more fastidious about the rest of my collection, though.

daddyo
April 7, 2008, 09:21 PM
I've got a Marlin Model 70 (box magazine). The firing pin begins to get gritty and starts misfiring after about 100 rounds, which means basically every time I shoot it :) . The easiest way to get it clean is to take the bolt out. With the bolt out, I can push a brass rod down the bore, and screw on a patch puller with a Hoppes soaked patch on it. If it comes out green, I push then pull a brush through (with the bolt out, it easily goes all the way through) and start pulling patches through until they come out clean. I only recently started using the boresnake. Miracle product for sure. Especially on those tiny .22 and .223 chambers.

If you can't find field stripping instructions anywhere else, let me know and I'll copy them from my manual (all Marlin .22's are basically the same, my receiver even has a hole in it where the tube magazine would attach).

plexreticle
April 7, 2008, 09:25 PM
Less is more when it comes to cleaning .22LR.

bensdad
April 7, 2008, 09:28 PM
Cleaning a .22? Whudja, drop it in the mud?

rangerruck
April 7, 2008, 11:39 PM
22's rarely need cleaning, the best thing to do is to use foaming cleaner, leave in for 10 minutes, brush out , patch out, repeat the above.
likghty wipe down, clean , and lightly lube everything else. lightly lube the bore when done as well.

Rugerlvr
April 8, 2008, 12:11 AM
Hmm, perhaps I overclean, but I usually run an impregnated patch (Hoppes 9) through the bore, then dry patch until clean, then drip a little oil down the muzzle and store upright. When I bought a ruger 10/22 off a guy, I had to strip the receiver and just about soak the thing in Hoppes 9 to clean out the gunk. After lubing it, I rarely clean anything except the throat & bore.

powermad
April 8, 2008, 12:20 AM
owners manual
http://stevespages.com/pdf/marlin_self_loading_rimfire_tube_feed_manual.pdf

351 WINCHESTER
April 8, 2008, 12:29 AM
I hardly ever clean my .22 bbls. When I do it's because the chamber has too much crud in it resulting in malfunctions. Your mileage may vary. I have used a boresnake with great results.

TimboKhan
April 8, 2008, 02:55 AM
For those of you who did not read powermads Marlin owners manual, it states on page 5 that unless the inside of your barrel gets wet or obstructed, there is no reason to clean it.

Thats pretty clear cut, lol.

jackdanson
April 8, 2008, 03:45 AM
I have a similar tube fed marlin and it has never been stripped. Probably over 25 years old passed from my dad to me shot thousands of rounds. Occasionaly I'll have problems if the chamber gets "clogged" with gunk, but that is the only cleaning I do. Still shoots great.

RickH
April 8, 2008, 05:00 AM
I have a Marlin model 60. I just run some oiled patches down the barrel after shooting it. It only gets shot a few times a year. After a few thousand rounds of cheap bulk ammo it gets gunked up. When that happens take it apart and clean all the crud out of the action, oil lightly, and shoot some more.

heypete
April 8, 2008, 05:22 AM
I clean my Ruger 10/22 regularly, as I shoot it with a suppressor and crud builds up regularly in the action, magazines, and bore. Not just a normal thin layer of residue, but big chunky pieces of carbon and other residue. (The suppressor creates a lot of backpressure and blows the crap back into the action.)

I put some CLP on a Bore Snake (the part before the bronze brushes) and run it from breech-to-muzzle twice. That cleans the barrel satisfactorily.

I don't understand all the talk about "cleaning damages .22 barrels" -- they're made of the same (or similar) steel to other gun barrels, and so long as one doesn't go completely overboard in their attempts at cleaning, no damage should occur.

Bore Snakes are amazing things, and I have one in each caliber I shoot. Makes life exceedingly easy.

TimboKhan
April 8, 2008, 07:16 AM
I clean my Ruger 10/22 regularly, as I shoot it with a suppressor and crud builds up regularly in the action, magazines, and bore. Not just a normal thin layer of residue, but big chunky pieces of carbon and other residue. (The suppressor creates a lot of backpressure and blows the crap back into the action.)

Well, see, that makes more sense because it's not "normal" usage. In normal shooting, cleaning the barrel just simply isn't necessary. I sort of agree that your probably not going to hurt anything if your using a brass or nylon brush, but it just isn't a requirement to keep it functioning and shooting accurately.

I have been thinking about it, and I honestly don't think I have ever really cleaned my one 10/22, and I know I haven't oiled it because I have never had it apart, and I have had that rifle for over 20 years now. Still shoots like a champ!

stubbicatt
April 8, 2008, 09:10 AM
Anymore I prefer to clean the breechblock and action parts well, and try to use dry patches on the bore to get the smuts out. Sometimes I'll put a borebrush in the chamber, and sort of twist it around in there to get any residue from the throat of the barrel. The lubricant from the lead bullets sort of coats the bore. You need a certain number of rounds down the bore for it to settle in.

If you deeply clean the bore you remove that layer of lubricant, which you will only need to replenish by shooting additional rounds until the rifle "settles in."

Since the advent of noncorrosive priming compounds, the necessity of cleaning your firearm to prevent rust has greatly diminished.

So. Run a bore snake down the bore dry. Clean the breechblock or bolt and the receiver to assure proper function. And shoot the firearm until you get sick of it. Brushes and solvents really have no place in a 22 rimfire.

My $.02

CajunBass
April 8, 2008, 10:47 AM
I've got a tube fed Marlin model 60, and the only parts I clean are the bolt and trigger group,

For those of you with a tube fed 22, don't forget to clean that magazine tube from time to time. I had trouble with my Marlin 39a not feeding properly. When I cleaned the magazine tube it was full of black looking "gunk" that I suspect was mostly just plain dirt and bullet lube. It took several patches with Hoppes on them to get it clean. Rifle functioned fine after that. Same thing for the follower that slides inside the tube. That needs to be cleaned inside and out to get the same "gunk" out.

We think about cleaning magazines for handguns, 10/22's and such, but I know I never thought about the tube magazine on my 39.

Mike 56
April 8, 2008, 11:57 AM
I would use a bore snake with the brush removed or better yet a Patchworm. http://20-20.8m.com/. If i was using a cleaning rod to clean a 22 semi auto rifle i would use a 22 handgun brush and patch puller. Coat your cleaning rod with CLP insert in the muzzle through to the breech screw on a bore brush or patch puller and pull the brush or patch puller through the bore with a muzzle guide. Wipe and re lube the rod every time before putting the cleaning rod in your barrel. One word of warning about lubing a Marlin 60 tub magazine don't leave Breakfree or Hope's No9 on the tube it will attack the brass and make gummy mess. Rubbing alcohol works good for cleaning the tube And a coat of silacone spray will make the tube slide easy.

Mike

saltydog452
April 8, 2008, 01:26 PM
Most of my .22rf shooting has been with handguns, specifically a Ruger Mk1, High Standard, and Smith Mdl 41.

(As a side note, the Ruger Mk 1 is the only semiauto pistol, of whatever flavor, that has never had a malfunction that was not ammunition related.)

Just keep the recessed area of the bolt face clear of accumulated crud. That'll help prevent an alibi 'dud'.

I used to slather Marvel Mystery Oil all over the bolt. (It looked and smelled like Transmission fluid). Don't know if it helped much, but it give me something to do during relays and, I think, didn't hurt.

'Tight' or 'Match' chambered .22rf rifles may need more attention to the chamber and bolt face than working 22s.

Unless the 'Match' .22rf is a bolt action rifle or a 'take-down' like the Rossi or Marlin 39, cleaning the chamber may prove to be something of a problem.

Just shoot it. Clean the bolt face recess every thousand rounds or so. A skinny flat blade screwdiver or pocket knife blade works. Add a drop or two of Grandma's Singer Sewing Machine Oil every leap year.

If you need to feel good about cleaning, use a bore snake, a skinny tooth brush and Hoppes #9. (Note: Continued use of Hoppes Number 9 using the same tooth brush with nylon bristles will eventually cause strange things to happen to the nylon toothbrush/bristles. I 'spect the Hoppes may have some Acetone in its composition.)

salty

saltydog452
April 8, 2008, 01:32 PM
Oops, Double post. Delete.

sd.

heypete
April 8, 2008, 03:37 PM
Well, see, that makes more sense because it's not "normal" usage. In normal shooting, cleaning the barrel just simply isn't necessary. I sort of agree that your probably not going to hurt anything if your using a brass or nylon brush, but it just isn't a requirement to keep it functioning and shooting accurately.

See, this is what puzzles me...what is it about .22s that makes them exempt from cleaning, while non-.22 guns require routine cleaning?

They're all burning chemically similar powders, with chemically similar primers. The residue should, I think, be quite similar. The only difference is that most centerfire guns shoot copper jacketed bullets, while most .22s shoot either copper plated lead or lubricated bare lead bullets.

Even when shooting unsuppressed, I clean my .22s just like I do any other ordinary gun, and for the same reasons. Your (meaning "everyone else", not a specific person) mileage may vary.

CZguy
April 8, 2008, 04:44 PM
See, this is what puzzles me...what is it about .22s that makes them exempt from cleaning, while non-.22 guns require routine cleaning?

They're all burning chemically similar powders, with chemically similar primers. The residue should, I think, be quite similar. The only difference is that most centerfire guns shoot copper jacketed bullets, while most .22s shoot either copper plated lead or lubricated bare lead bullets.

Even when shooting unsuppressed, I clean my .22s just like I do any other ordinary gun, and for the same reasons. Your (meaning "everyone else", not a specific person) mileage may vary.
__________________

.22s are loaded with pixie dust and don't get dirty. :D

Actually .22s just don't burn enough powder to get that hot.

I don't clean the bores of my rim-fires until I see accuracy fall off. You can actually decrease accuracy by having a clean bore.

I clean the action when a malfunction occurs. (semi annually)

I wipe the outside of the firearm down with Rem-oil after each use.

Stop by Remfirecentral.com and read some of the cleaning posts.

Leadhead
April 8, 2008, 07:15 PM
I made my own .22 patchworm for pulling through patches using .095 Grass Trimmer Line(weed wacker).
First I melted the end and pushed it against a flatsurface, then let it cool and shaped it down to size with some sandpaper and a block.
I used a spent .22 case as a gauge for sizing and it works great!
I cut the other end of the cord on an angle and I thread it through a hole in the center of a patch, add a couple drops of CLP and then pull it through.
Leaves the barrel clean of powder residue and lightly oiled.

DWH
April 9, 2008, 12:01 AM
Go here:

http://20-20.8m.com/

and buy a patch worm kit with some felt buttons. Spray the button with the cleaner of your choice pull it through the barrel, pull a dry button through, repeat if needed.

Simple!

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