FN Hi-Power loose trigger pin


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Danus ex
April 13, 2008, 07:56 PM
Today I removed the magazine disconnect safety from my CDNN FN Hi-Power. After some whacking (and denting), I quickly found that both the trigger pin and the magazine disconnect retaining pin were too stubborn for my hammer and punch blows, so I gently pressed them out without any real difficulty.

Reassembly was simple enough--I pressed both pins back in with no problems. Unfortunately, the once-stubborn trigger pin is now loose enough for me to push out with the tip of a rifle bullet, and the pin moves counter-clockwise a little bit with the trigger when you pull it, like a tiny, reversed clock. It moves from side-to-side about 1/16 of an inch.

Anyone else encounter this after removing their magazine disconnect safety? How on earth could such a tight pin become so loose after removing and replacing it only once, and messing with it in no other way? Is it a problem? If so, what can I do about it?

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jaydubya
April 13, 2008, 08:50 PM
Every now and then when I field strip my T-series Browning Hi Power, purchased in 1967, I have to adjust the trigger pin with my fingers. No big thing. And it still has the magazine safety installed.
Cordially, Jack

Rampant_Colt
April 13, 2008, 08:57 PM
Anyone else encounter this after removing their magazine disconnect safety? How on earth could such a tight pin become so loose after removing and replacing it only once, and messing with it in no other way? Is it a problem? If so, what can I do about it?
If there is one major flaw with the BHP, it would be that completely UNnecessary evil trigger plunger that wreaks havoc on trigger pull and quick mag drops.

Leave the stupid, unnecessary thing outta your gun and enjoy a better trigger pull and drop-free mags...

BHPshooter
April 14, 2008, 12:37 AM
Please, please, please tell me you drove the pin out from right to left...

If you did, sometimes you have to play with the trigger spring to get it to hold the pin in tightly enough. Make sure you put the pin in OVER the spring, not under it. You usually have to drive the pin in halfway, push the spring down with a punch or something, and drive it in the rest of the way.

Wes

Danus ex
April 14, 2008, 02:10 PM
Please, please, please tell me you drove the pin out from right to left...

If you did, sometimes you have to play with the trigger spring to get it to hold the pin in tightly enough. Make sure you put the pin in OVER the spring, not under it. You usually have to drive the pin in halfway, push the spring down with a punch or something, and drive it in the rest of the way.

Wes

Yup, I pressed it out from right to left. Also, my "press" in this case is a bench vise with a set of jaws that have channels cut to accept blocks with protruding pin-punch-like modules on one end, and a hole to accept the pin on the other. I have very fine control with this setup.

The spring is under the pin, and seems to be resting in the little groove that was made for it.

Rampant_Colt
April 14, 2008, 11:54 PM
The obvious choice would be to just leave it out as it serves no useful purpose

Stephen A. Camp
April 15, 2008, 09:29 AM
He is speaking of the pin on which the trigger rotates and is necessary for the pistol to work.

HammerBite
April 15, 2008, 01:13 PM
Also, my "press" in this case is a bench vise with a set of jaws that have channels cut to accept blocks with protruding pin-punch-like modules on one end, and a hole to accept the pin on the other. I have very fine control with this setup.
That sounds very interesting. Please elaborate. I could use something like that.

DEDON45
April 15, 2008, 06:26 PM
I don't have an HP, but a friend that does, and yes, he loathes the mag safety... it's a newer one, and I understand that these may have pins that have been machine-pressed in...

When you guys say "right to left" you mean push the pin from the right side of the gun, if you were holding the grip in your hand in a shooting stance (basically the same as when you push the hammer and sear pin out of a 1911)? We may borrow a mechanic's press and try to push the pin out, and I'd hate to ruin the frame by pushing it from the wrong direction.

Danus ex
April 17, 2008, 06:09 PM
I'd hate to ruin the frame by pushing it from the wrong direction.

I'm not sure if that's possible. The OD of the pin does not appear to be tapered, and the groove for the spring doesn't have a special angle on either side. I think the right-to-left recommendation is because it's easier to get the pin started from the protruding (usually right) side.

That sounds very interesting. Please elaborate. I could use something like that.

This vice punch thing I've got was my solution to my clumsiness when using a hammer and punches. The project took me so long that I eventually did get pretty good with a hammer and punches, but they're still far from ideal. Here's the basic tool used for what we're trying to accomplish when pressing out pins: the arbor press (http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=20674&R=20674&cm_ven=TL&cm_cat=ERK&cm_pla=Google&cm_ite=metalfab). Clearly, that specific press is not ideal for pressing out stubborn small pins.

My vise isn't really a bench vise, it's meant for use on milling machines and grinders. One of these (http://www.kurtworkholding.com/workholding/anglock_d.php) but older. As you can see, the jaws come off easily.

So, picture an over-wide set of jaws that extend beyond the width of those in the above link. Now, from the top of the jaws, mill a slot down toward the bottom, stopping about 1/4" from cutting a complete slot. Do this on each side of both jaw screws, so you've got four slots total per jaw: two inside the vise body/clamp area, two outside on the over-wide jaws. Your slot can be of any shape I suppose. I used a T-shape because I hate working with funny angles (ahem...dovetail).

Now to go in those slots, you need the pin and hole modules. You can probably picture these: T-shaped blocks that fit in the slot with pins of various diameters and lengths for one side, and holes of various diameters and lengths on the other. I've also got spacer blanks so I can change the height of the punch modules, and full-length spacers so these jaws will behave as normal jaws.

Stephen A. Camp

Mr. Camp, can you weigh in on this problem? Has it been an issue with your Hi-Powers?

HammerBite
April 17, 2008, 06:11 PM
Thank you.

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