Ned Kelly the Movie


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akodo
April 14, 2008, 02:49 PM
I was watching the netflix 'instant' online movie "Ned Kelly" set in Australia. As I am sure you know it started out as a penal collony and this one appears to be set one or two generations after the penalists arrived, probably 1870s or so.

Anyways I cannot imagine how anti-gunners can watch movies like this and stay anti-gun.

General troublemaker family but portrayed in a good light kind of like Dukes of Hazard, including a hot daughter kind of like Daisey Duke. Bumbling deputy clashes in minor ways with the young men, but still comes on to Daisey Duke all the time.

Deputy Rosco rides out at night to woo Daisey Duke, who is not interested, so he claims he has warrants for the arrest of the Duke Boys and he will excersize them unless she invites him in and acts nice.

Duke Boys demand warrant, Deputy Rosco pulls out a cap and ball revolver and says 'I got your warrants right here!'

Now here is where Australia diverges from the USA. Uncle Jessie (or in this case Ma Kelly) would poke her head out of the cottage and say "happens to be I got one of them there warrants myself" while the old ithica 12 or smoothbore musket is leveled at Deputy Rosco.

Of course, here, as always, a group of men are neutralized by a "copper" with a single handgun.

Maybe an individual armed citizen cannot hold off the SWAT team, but he can sure stop minor government agents from forcing their affections on his attractive daughters with one.


(and for the record, if 1 out of 10 individual gun owners manage to wound a single SWAT team member as they rush in and take him out, the government will run out of SWAT before we run out of gun owners...and it will be kind of difficult to recruit more)

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Treo
April 14, 2008, 03:43 PM
Are you talking about that gawd-awful movie they made back in the 60s, staring Mic Jagger as Ned Kelly?

Beyond that this thread's gonna get locked quick the mods get a leetle bit antsy when you start talking about shooting cops

R127
April 14, 2008, 04:15 PM
Akodo wasn't talking about shooting cops, he was talking about shooting potential tyrants forcefully victimizing you. Would the mods here also get antsy about shooting Nazi SS officers? After all they were government workers. Akodo has a good point, if somebody is trying to rape your daughter they deserve to be shot. Unless you believe working for the government makes you a super-citizen with rights beyond ordinary citizens, like the right to rape a commoner's daughter in this case. Akodo has another good point, in several incidents when government workers have attacked innocent citizens they have proven to be less than superhuman, such as when the old lady who was attacked in Georgia shot back.

jakeswensonmt
April 14, 2008, 10:05 PM
Are you talking about that gawd-awful movie
I liked it.

Harley Quinn
April 14, 2008, 10:14 PM
He is talking the remake I believe:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ned_Kelly_(2003_film)

There were several made about Ned, similar to the legendary Earps of USA fame:

http://www.ironoutlaw.com/html/movies.html

Regards

daniel (australia)
April 15, 2008, 09:41 AM
Now here is where Australia diverges from the USA. Uncle Jessie (or in this case Ma Kelly) would poke her head out of the cottage and say "happens to be I got one of them there warrants myself" while the old ithica 12 or smoothbore musket is leveled at Deputy Rosco.

Of course, here, as always, a group of men are neutralized by a "copper" with a single handgun.

Maybe an individual armed citizen cannot hold off the SWAT team, but he can sure stop minor government agents from forcing their affections on his attractive daughters with one.

While Ned has been a bit of a folk hero here, I don't think he's such a good poster boy for the right to keep and bear arms. Even before the incident you describe he was a young bloke who'd had a number of arrests and served time in jail twice. The first conviction was for assault and for sending an indecent note to the victim's wife. Weeks after being released from his first stint in jail young Ned got three years for an assault on a policeman: Ned resisted arrest, disarmed the cop and rode him around like a horse. He'd also been part of Harry Power's gang of bushrangers, and there were claims that he'd avoided conviction on other charges as a result of witnesses being threatened.

Other members of his family also had criminal records too, and a number were involved with Ned in horse-stealing and cattle duffing.

Anyway, as for the incident depicted in the movie, the cop in question, one Fitzpatrick, was disarmed by the Kellys. He was knocked down and given a good thrashing for his cheek in fact. He claimed that the Kellys all drew down on him with revolvers too, but they denied this.

In any case, after the Fitzpatrick incident Ned and Dan Kelly and two of their mates went bush, and not long after that they attacked a police party sent out to find them, killing three policemen. They then went on something of a robbery spree, and murdered a suspected informant, before the notorious last stand at Glenrowan.

Now there may well be some argument that the cops had given the Kellys a hard time before all this, and thereby provoked what happened after (though this does rather ignore the fact that the Kellys were demonstrably criminals), but it is simply ludicrous to suggest that the Kellys weren't able to respond, when respond they so clearly did.

FWIW There were no gun laws at the time in question:strict gun laws are a much more recent phenomenon here in Australia.

Right up until roughly the 1930s there were essentially no gun laws at all, and pretty much everyone had guns for hunting and defence, particularly in some of the wilder areas. Members of my family for example were involved in wounding and capturing a notorious serial killer who'd gone on a rampage across New South Wales in 1900 (fictionalised as "The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith"). Shooting was also a popular sport.

Even far more recently, when I was a kid, you could buy longarms in most jurisdictions with no restrictions at all - no licences, background checks, waiting periods or anything, just slap your money down and say "I'll have that one please, yes the AR15 there, and a case of ammo thanks". School cadets were issued rifles out of the school armoury, and would take them home on the school bus or train.

Pistols were more tightly restricted, but we had CCW permits for anyone with a reasonable reason. It is really only over very recent years that we've seen these freedoms become more and more constrained. That doesn't mean we are disarmed by any means, but it is not as easy as it was or should be to remained armed (legally at least - there'd be huge numbers of "off-licence" guns floating around). The pace and extent of change should serve as a warning.

jackstinson
April 15, 2008, 09:50 AM
I used to live in a few miles from Beechworth, Victoria...way back when I lived in Australia (I worked in Wangaratta). I saw Ned's battered helmet armor that is kept in the museum there.
Actually, the place I lived in used to be a gold era town Police Station (before the town proper burned in a bushfire) and it still had the two cells in a back building. The owners of the property told me that good ol' Ned spent a few nights in one of those cells. The place was an historical site when I lived there.
BTW- I did a lot of rabbit hunting in the bush and fields around that area with an Erma M-22.
Both of the movies were pretty bad, IMO. But Jagger's was the worst.
Jack

Harley Quinn
April 15, 2008, 10:13 AM
At 9am on the morning of November 11, as a crowd of 5,000 gathered outside the Melbourne Gaol, Ned was transferred to the condemned cell. Just before 10am, he was led out onto the scaffold. As the hangman adjusted the hood to cover his face, Kelly's last words were: “Arr well, I suppose it has to come to this. Such... (is life)”. At four minutes past 10, the executioner pulled the lever and Ned Kelly plunged into immortality. His headless body was buried in an unmarked grave on the grounds of the Old Melbourne Gaol. It was then later removed to Pentridge Prison's Cemetery.
*************

:uhoh:

akodo this is a good read:

http://www.ironoutlaw.com/html/history_01.html

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