Auto Ordnance Tommy Gun


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jeff_d_148
April 14, 2008, 09:29 PM
I've been considering buying one of the Auto Ordnance Tommy Guns, probably the Model TM1C. Does anybody know of a feasible way to mount an Insight X2 Light/Laser Combo on the bottom of the forend?

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GarandOwner
April 14, 2008, 09:52 PM
you could drill the front handguard and mount one im sure....but it would prob look real tacky

transformerguru
April 14, 2008, 11:04 PM
I gotta ask, why? Thompsons really aren't tacticool type rifles IMO.

xd45gaper
April 14, 2008, 11:17 PM
i gotta ask WHY also.

buck00
April 14, 2008, 11:24 PM
Please don't do that. :barf:

SHOOT1SAM
April 14, 2008, 11:34 PM
BLASPHEMY !!!!!!!!

Diamondback6
April 14, 2008, 11:38 PM
Jeff, at one time I was actually looking at trying to build a new forend with light and laser embedded in it. If it's feasible, that would be a classier way to go...

pgeleven
April 14, 2008, 11:45 PM
would you like to put a polymer stock on it as well? maybe a bipod....

Atla
April 14, 2008, 11:54 PM
It's your gun, your money - do what you want with it.

Ignore these nay-sayers.

mgregg85
April 15, 2008, 12:00 AM
I guess I don't see what the blasphemy thing is all about. If this were an original thompson I would join right in and condemn any such action. Being that it is a new and non-historical gun, why not if thats what the guy wants. Sounds like one hell of a defense piece, especially with a C drum attached. Mmm, .45 ACP rifle/pistol thing.

Might as well get the blackened commando version.

Logan5
April 15, 2008, 01:13 AM
Ok, it's not blasphemy, but a lot of people would feel that such a thing would be stupid looking. It's a Thompson, not a Lasercat.

DoubleTapDrew
April 15, 2008, 01:24 AM
Duct tape! :)

You'd probably have to screw a hunk of picatinny rail into the foreend like people with A2 handguards do with AR-15s. I admit I have thought a polymer stock set with something similar to surefire's shotgun foreends might make a good defensive Thompson but I don't think there's anywhere near enough demand to justify the development and production costs.
The other option would probably be a barrel clamp, but I can't imagine either option looking right.

Kind of Blued
April 15, 2008, 01:48 AM
I want a Thompson too! I assume the light/laser mean that this would be for home defense. The way that I see it, any way you go, a shotgun or handgun would be more appropriate for such a purpose, depending on your preference. If I had to use a .45ACP carbine for home defense, it would be an HK USC 45 with the necessary tacticool stuff . Those Thompsons are HEAVY too!

trickyasafox
April 15, 2008, 02:43 AM
I got to play with an auto ord tommy gun about a year ago. Only got to run 2 30 round sticks through it, but it shot well-

heavy thing- thats for sure. Good luck on your project, i'm not sure on the feasibility of it. The ribbed barrel will be an interesting problem.

PTK
April 15, 2008, 03:01 AM
If you haven't handled one in person, don't buy it sight unseen! The cocking knob and recoil spring are VERY stiff from the factory, to the point that it's nigh impossible to cock.

pgeleven
April 15, 2008, 03:03 AM
any of you living in eastern NC, hit up Sportsmans Lodge in jacksonville, they have the real deal you can rent there

madcratebuilder
April 15, 2008, 08:59 AM
I've been considering buying one of the Auto Ordnance Tommy Guns, probably the Model TM1C. Does anybody know of a feasible way to mount an Insight X2 Light/Laser Combo on the bottom of the forend?
That would be bad Ju-Ju.

If you haven't handled one in person, don't buy it sight unseen! The cocking knob and recoil spring are VERY stiff from the factory, to the point that it's nigh impossible to cock.
You can buy a spring kit that reduces the pull required to cock it. With the oem spring and the sharp edge of the cocking handle, you can rip a chunk of meat off your hand in a heart beat.
The rear sight is lacking, but you can get a quality replacement. With a fifty round drum it's a heavy SOB.
I want to shorten my barrel to 16" and cut down the comp to original size, add a detachable buttstock. You need lots of ammo if you own one.
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d37/madcratebuilder/tomgun.jpg.jpg

sojournerhome
April 15, 2008, 01:48 PM
These are such cool rifles. But, I have no use for one. Whay a laser. it would seem too heavy for home SD.

GarandOwner
April 15, 2008, 01:53 PM
I want to shorten my barrel to 16" and cut down the comp to original size,

10.5" is the length of the original barrels. If you are going to shorten it, thats the length you want. It would be wise to buy one of the short barrels rather than try and modify the one that comes on it.

Dollar An Hour
April 15, 2008, 02:14 PM
These interest me as well. Do the aluminum-receiver models hold up OK? The weigh in at about 8 lbs instead of 12 or 13, and cost less to boot.

But I understand you'll need to loctite the rear sight on the aluminum receiver models or the screws will back themselves out.

Still, for the money, I don't know if I can justify one. The biggest thing they seem to have going for them is 'cool' factor. :)

dscottw88
April 15, 2008, 03:32 PM
Yeah, Your probably better off buying a short barrel rather than choping off the long one. If I got one, it'd be the M1 model with the short barrel.

jeff_d_148
April 15, 2008, 07:20 PM
Why? Because it would be different and cool. And since I intend to use it for home or office defense I think a light is obligatory. And I already have an Insight X2 for my S&W M&P compact 9mm.

I already have an M4 at the house that I use as my primary defense weapon, but the only range where I am able to shoot it is an hour away. I want to get a pistol caliber carbine so I can shoot it at the range that is closer to my house.

I've also been considering the Beretta, Ruger PC-9, or maybe even the Kel-Tec. They seem more conducive to mounting tactical accessories. And I'm not crazy about the fact that the Tommy Gun only shoots FMJ rounds (according to the manual on their website).

If I do end up getting one it will be the light weight one (8 lbs vs 12 lbs).

GearHead_1
April 15, 2008, 07:21 PM
This is on my list of guns to buy but I would leave it just the way it is.

dfariswheel
April 15, 2008, 08:46 PM
Couple of points on the Thompson Semi-Auto:

First, the fore end is attached to a steel bar that projects from the front of the receiver.
This bar is held in place by the barrel and cannot be removed without first removing the barrel.
This is NO JOB for someone without some heavy-duty Thompson specific tooling.

Happily, the bar would be easy to use as a mount or a mount/grip.
It already has one large tapped hole for the fore end bolt, and others can be easily drilled and tapped. With the original fore end back on the gun, there'd be no signs of the alteration.

Second, you can't practically shorten the 16 inch semi-auto barrel due to the taper of the barrel.
If the barrel is shortened, the taper will not allow remounting either a band-type front sight, nor can it be threaded to mate with the Cutts compensator muzzle brake.
The area where the cut would be will be too small to fit the sight or Cutts device.

If you want an SBR, buy a Thompson SMG 10 inch barrel and have some who's familiar with the Thompson's re-barrel it.
Fair warning: The semi-auto barrels on on SUPER TIGHT, and you'll not get it off with anything other than professional tooling.

10-Ring
April 15, 2008, 08:52 PM
That might be cool after you have it hard chromed :D and a good roll of duct tape :neener:

nwilliams
April 15, 2008, 09:41 PM
I love my Thompson 1927A-1 Deluxe! I have about a thousand rounds through it so far and its has zero issues. The last few hundred rounds have been Wolf and even that feeds through it just fine. The charging handle is difficult pull back at first but now I can do it with no problem at all. There is no recoil to speak of and yes this gun is not a tack driver nor is it very practical or ergonomic and its as heavy as a barrel of bricks. Still it is it a hoot to shoot and ranks way up there on the cool factor. I picked up mine brand new for $1200 and that included the 50rd drum, 30rd stick, violin case and regular foam fitted hard case, not bad at all in book especially for the steel receiver version.

Now to your question, I'm sure its possible but I have to agree with others that its not going to look very good. Why turn a classic looking firearm into an ubber-cool mall ninja special? I say buy one and enjoy it but leave it the way it is. Its not going to make a very practical home defense weapon anyway at least not in my opinion. Mine has been very reliable on the range and seems to go bang every time, however I wouldn't trust my life to it. In a home defense situation my Thompson is not something I would grab unless I had no other choice, especially since I have my AR sitting right next to it.

Still you can do what you want with your own guns and I'm sure there is a way you could attach something to the barrel that just clamps on. Maybe even tap the side of the receiver and install a side mounted rail system:rolleyes:

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb264/nwilliams27/Thompson1.jpg

TexasRifleman
April 15, 2008, 09:46 PM
ounds like one hell of a defense piece, especially with a C drum attached.

Defense piece implies that it would function reliably.

The Auto Ordnance Thompsons are ANYTHING but reliable.

Zach S
April 15, 2008, 10:18 PM
and a good roll of duct tape West Virginia Hard Chrome...

sounds like one hell of a defense piece, especially with a C drum attached. The drum rattles too much and makes it akward to handle.

The Auto Ordnance Thompsons are ANYTHING but reliable.Dont tell the two I own, they haven't given me any problems in the past several thousand rounds.

mukluk
April 16, 2008, 03:55 AM
And I'm not crazy about the fact that the Tommy Gun only shoots FMJ rounds (according to the manual on their website).

Mine shoots hollow points no problem, the caveat being you must use a stick mag, they will not feed out of the drum.

These interest me as well. Do the aluminum-receiver models hold up OK? The weigh in at about 8 lbs instead of 12 or 13, and cost less to boot.

The most common complaint I've heard on the aluminum version is the feed ramps wear rather quickly. If longevity is important to you get the steel receiver version. Regarding weight, if installing a 10.5 inch short barrel is an available option to you, that would trim the steel receiver Tommy down to about 9.5 pounds.


Over 6000 rounds and still fun as hell :cool:
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d178/SMLE1918/Tommy/1005.jpg

madcratebuilder
April 16, 2008, 07:33 AM
Second, you can't practically shorten the 16 inch semi-auto barrel due to the taper of the barrel.
If the barrel is shortened, the taper will not allow remounting either a band-type front sight, nor can it be threaded to mate with the Cutts compensator muzzle brake.
The area where the cut would be will be too small to fit the sight or Cutts device.

I have been debating if I want to do the barrel myself, I have shorten several barrels on my lathe, it's not rocket science. This (http://tommygunner.com/pages/services/index.htm) shop does Tommy guns only and are very reasonable in their cost for barrel and comp work. I would prefer to make this a sbr, but it is unregistered and I want to keep it that way.

The Auto Ordnance Thompsons are ANYTHING but reliable.
The first thing I did to mine was clean up the feed ramp, I have about 1500 rounds without a failure after I got rid of one defective GI mag. The 50 rd drum works great, would like to find a good deal on a 100 rd drum.

Mukluk, nice wood man.

Owlnmole
April 16, 2008, 09:01 AM
I don't want to add anything to this discussion except to say that I fired an original Thompson M1A1 many times growing up (my grandfather was a gun dealer with a Class III license) and it was great fun. Short bursts, shoulder or hip, plenty accurate for the purpose, just fantastic. Rugged, reliable and deadly as long as the targets is no more than 50 yards away (OK 100 yards in a pinch). I would carry one in an urban SHTF situation without hesitation.

I would also add that the new Auto Ordnance Thompson is available with a 16 1/2 in barrel and aluminum receiver or you can get an SBR model directly from the factory. There is also a new Thompson pistol (!) with no shoulder stock and a 50-round drum that should get anyone's attention right quick.

TexasRifleman
April 16, 2008, 10:04 AM
Dont tell the two I own, they haven't given me any problems in the past several thousand rounds.

Well mine was the opposite. It never would even run through a complete magazine without some kind of stoppage.

When I had it SBR'd the smith worked over the thing and now it's fine, but that was $600 later. (Some of that was the SBR, seems like it was around $200 for the reliability mods and the mag release mod).

M2 Carbine
April 16, 2008, 11:48 AM
The reliability thing.
My Thompson is totally reliable with RN ammo but jams on SWC bullets.

Since rifle sights are blurred for me anymore I use a lot of Red Dot sights and scopes. Also use a lot of laser/lights.

I made a mount that attach's to the original rear sight mounting holes.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v135/Bell406_206B/ThompsonRedDot-1.jpg

If I wanted to attach a laser/light (I use Streamlight TLR-2) I'd buy a spare forearm from Kahr and attach a rail to it. Either underneath, near the front of the forearm or I'd see about making a mount that would hold the light up against the front of the forearm, like the lights are positioned in front of the trigger guard on pistols.

For something really temporary I think a short rail could be attached to a stick magazine. If you can't get the job done with 30 rounds, you are in big trouble.:)

Zach S
April 16, 2008, 05:29 PM
My Thompson is totally reliable with RN ammo but jams on SWC bullets.
Mine eats most JHPs without a problem from the stick mags, havent tried SWCs though.

M2, every time I see that pic I want to add a red dot to one of mine...

44AMP
April 16, 2008, 05:56 PM
RN (ball), RN (lead), SWC (lead) and JHP. My gun is Kahr marked, but works well. 30 rnd Sticks work fine. I have a 50rnd drum, which has not yet proven reliable. I have only tried it 3 time, but have had several failures, using only 230gr ball ammo. It may get better in time, and with some tweaking, but testing it is a pain, and expensive with factory ammo.

My gun is accurate enough to shoot one hole 5 shot groups at 25 yards, and hit the 200 yard gong using the ladder sight. Miserable long spongy trigger pull though. It does take some strength to cycle the action, but it takes some strength just to hold the beast up in firing position! If you can't work it, grow stronger!

At 12+lbs empty, fairly long, and deep, the civilian Tommygun is a far cry from a good defensive weapon for indoor use. On the other hand, the visual impact of the gun is just tremendous! If you have something like a trespass situation (in daylight), and you want to ensure intimidation, the sight of the Tommygun works as well or better than the racking of a pump shotgun!

For checking out a noise in the night, there are many better tools than the Tommygun, even with a laser or light. On the other hand, the Tommygun would be a very effective defensive tool if you hit someone with it. I don't mean shoot them, I mean hit them with that heavy chunk of steel! Or just drop it on their foot! Either way, it's going to hurt!

I really love mine, it is a lot of fun to shoot, and impresses the heck oput of the kids, but practical? No.

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