Random person claiming to be from here IMs me with odd questions?


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greenr18
April 16, 2008, 03:36 PM
Ok so I don't remember their screen name exactly, i think it was like katielynn23362 or something like that, but whoever it was IM'd me on AIM, no clue who they were so I asked if I knew them and they said no they were a new member to THR and sought out my SN to talk to me out of boredom. Ok I thought, so I talked to them for a while and it was a pretty regular conversation, (oh by the way the person claimed their name to be Emily, their age to be 25, and their location MN, I didn't ask for their ASL they gave it after telling me they were from here) then the conversation started getting weird, they asked if I had a girlfriend to which I said no, then they started asking random sexual questions and at that point I basically thought alright, someone I know is playing a prank on me. I asked they come out with who they really were, and why their SN was katielynn if there name was Emily, their response was "Katie Lynn was my twin sister who died" 'a huh." I thought and responded with ...I seee.... I IM'd someone else I know and asked if they were this katielynn screen name, they responded no and suggested I google this persons screen name, I did and came up with a page from some car forum about some guy who had been contacted by this person also claiming to be a new member from here, despite that person she contacted hadnt even heard of the high road. Come to think of it, she never even said the high road she just said THR. I asked this person if I didnt know them and they werent someone i knew playing a prank on me then why would they ask random sexual questions and other things to which they replied with "fine if you dont want to talk to me" and logged off. Weird. So my question is, anyone else get this random crap? who is this person? or is this even a person, some well crafted spam bot or something? kind of random. just wanted to put it up

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Pweller
April 16, 2008, 04:15 PM
Maybe this sounds a bit paranoid, but I think I have heard of similar situations before. I think what someone is trying to do is to is to get you to be their internet 'boyfriend' and then essentially get you involved in some criminal activities. Most internet sellers are very suspicious of sending expensive things to overseas buyers (expecially in certain countries). So, criminals from out of the country will try to get a 'friend' in the US to accept shipments of goods for them. Of course, they use a stolen credit card number to buy the goods. They order stuff in your name, have it sent to your address, and then convice you to forward the goods to them. Of course, now you're in the middle of a crime. This helps insulate the criminals from being identified (not that anyone in the US really cares about overseas criminals), and having a US address to ship to helps them get the goods.

I know it sounds a bit convoluted, but I think I have heard of stories like this before, where the 'boyfriend' and 'girlfriend' have never even met before, but the 'boyfriend' was accepting shipments and forwarding them out of the country! The '25 yr old female' part of your description makes me more suspicious of this (if the description was a 60+ year old man, I would have not had the same suspicion.)

Edit: I just took off my tin-foil hat and did a little google research on this. Even I thought my response was a little wacky sounding, but I found this article:

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2007/07/26/1185339134017.html

It describes a guy who was contacted from his myspace page. Here's a piece of it:

The scam unfolds in much the same way as the classic Nigerian scam. An ongoing dialogue with the victim is initiated and once trust has been established, the scammer typically appeals for some type of help - generally to move funds or help them out when they suddenly find themselves in trouble.

In the case of Lena, she said she had decided to visit her sister in Australia and see Danny at the same time, and because she didn't ask for money at the outset, he took her at her word, and began to plan for her visit.

"I was happy for her to come, but I wasn't about to send her money or anything. I thought maybe she was young and doing something a little rash," he said.

It was not until she revealed that her sister's husband was encountering problems transferring the money to Russia for her airfare, Danny's suspicions were aroused. And when she finally asked him directly to transfer money on her behalf, he decided to dig around a little, and uncovered a number of references to the Russian Dating Scam on forums dedicated to victims.

"It was then I became aware that she was very likely scamming me," he said.

Based on his research findings, Danny checked the IP address attached to Lena's emails and discovered they were coming from the Czech Republic - not St Petersburg where she claimed to live. In addition, her emails had been sent through a mass emailing client. When he asked her to clear up these anomalies, he never heard back from her.

Greenr18: Thanks for posting this, you might save someone else from getting scammed.

exar
April 16, 2008, 04:36 PM
Yeah, they're trying to play you for a fool. Don't fall for it. There are way's to make them suffer financially if you were really wanting to show them a lesson.

It gets very complicated but there are ways to convince them that you're selling a freight shipment of new Dell PC's (or whatever) for $100 a pop. They give you a mailing address in Nigeria and you ship them a pallet of bricks, busted toliets, busted refrigerators and set up shipment for payment by receiver. They think they are getting a pallet of Dell's when in reality they just forked over $1500 to accept a shipment of junk. Good way to teach 'em a lesson.

Mal H
April 16, 2008, 04:38 PM
I can find no member here with a username even remotely similar to any you described.

RNB65
April 16, 2008, 04:47 PM
There are way's to make them suffer financially if you were really wanting to show them a lesson.

No there isn't. Any money they provide will come from stolen credit card numbers. Won't cost them a penny.

So my question is, anyone else get this random crap? who is this person? or is this even a person, some well crafted spam bot or something? kind of random.

Just normal life on the Internet. Welcome to the Wild Wild West (21st century style).
-

BullfrogKen
April 16, 2008, 05:00 PM
This is really not much of a Tech Support question.

Closed, no further discussion really necessary after Mal's response.

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