What's The Etiquette On Carrying In Someone's Home


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Treo
April 17, 2008, 02:27 AM
Most of my friends aren't gun people and the .majority of them don't know I am.

So I was wondering do you carry in someone else's home or leave it in the car?

Please explain your answer

PS Personally I feel that if no place else the home is where you ( the home owner) are soveriegn

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PTK
April 17, 2008, 02:29 AM
I carry concealed until asked not to. It's never been an issue yet.

Jimmy Dean
April 17, 2008, 02:34 AM
I carry onceiled when in my parent's house, for when the neighbor kids are in and out. I cannot carry at my sisters, the girl who owns the house (and also lives there) doesn't like them, she's not against them, just doesn't see the point in owning them. She works in an inner-city school.... give it time.

I know in Louisiana, if you CC into someone's house, you have to notify them before you enter.

Kind of Blued
April 17, 2008, 02:35 AM
If it isn't posted, go for it. Seriously. Legally, it should be treated the same way that you do a privately-owned business.

If you think they'd freak out, maybe carry a more concealable gun, or in a more concealable manner.

If they find out and ask you to leave, leave.

Winchester 73
April 17, 2008, 02:41 AM
Concealed means concealed.(yes we know.)I carry.

Jimmy Dean
April 17, 2008, 02:41 AM
Um, in Louisiana I know, not notifying the homeowner is grounds for losing your CCW

guntotinguy
April 17, 2008, 02:53 AM
I carry concealed until asked not to. It's never been an issue yet.

This goes for me too,most people I know,dont know I carry concealed anyways...been to parties,home invites,even a couple of local casino meets and no problems because no one knew.

coloradokevin
April 17, 2008, 03:56 AM
I go with the whole "Don't ask Don't tell" policy myself.

plexreticle
April 17, 2008, 04:04 AM
When at my friends I take it off and put it on the coffee table. If I'm going to someone's house where that won't fly I just leave it in the truck and take my chances.

IndridCold
April 17, 2008, 04:23 AM
I consider it an insult to enter my home without a weapon.:D

SomeKid
April 17, 2008, 04:39 AM
I generally carry openly into their homes, assuming it is friends or family. If its business, concealed.

sacp81170a
April 17, 2008, 05:29 AM
It is an issue in Arkansas because our notification requirement is bascially the same as Louisiana, you have to notify the home owner. Where it becomes a problem is when you have folks who typically carry out their businesses in other people's homes, like locksmiths and plumbers. Locksmiths in particular can get called at some pretty odd hours and go into some pretty bad places. I wish they would clean that portion of the code up, but the conflict between home owner's rights and CCW are kinda sticky. It would be better to avoid the issue altogether and leave it up to the permit holder, but I guess they had to include that to get it passed in the first place.

TAB
April 17, 2008, 05:31 AM
All ways respect the home owners wishs... I'm sure you want people that come too your home to do the same.

USMC 1975
April 17, 2008, 06:24 AM
If I enter someones home, I probably know those people ( otherwise I wouldn't be there ). Since I know them personally, I am more then likely going to know their beliefs.

If they are people who do not care for guns, I would never carry in their homes and would leave the gun in the car. I do not want to put them into a position of making that choice. If they have young kids, I surely would never carry in their house as many parents freak out over their kids being around guns.

I just feel that is only respectful. Their house, their rules, their kids.

Chris

csmkersh
April 17, 2008, 09:25 AM
This is a "Don't ask; don't tell," situation.

358minus1
April 17, 2008, 09:28 AM
I believe in SC, upon entering a private residence, one is supposed to disclose to the owner that you are CCing.

No such requirement for a private business. Private businesses are supposed to have a very specific sign prominantly displayed at the entrance if they do not want CCing.

Ghost Tracker
April 17, 2008, 10:01 AM
I try to be as polite as I am when I'm not carrying - "Yes, thank you", "How nice of you", "What a lovely picture of your Grandchildren", etc.

I'm uncertain of the law in Ky. (I'll find out) as to my responsibility of informing my hosts of ANY items on my person. I don't currently begin my visits with an inventory report - "let's see..car keys, cell phone, wallet (inc. $73 cash), $.47 in loose change, pocket knife, a 3/8" sheet metal screw (I just picked-up out of your driveway) & a clean golf tee (that accidentally went through the wash)."

So I, too, am a "none of your business" responder. If I discover a condition of my permit that expressly requires my hosts be informed...then I'll further investigate the worst possible repercussions of ignoring the requirement (asked to leave, loss of permit, arrest, etc.). THEN, I'll decide if I'll leave my CCW in my vehicle or not. Because I WILL NOT begin a social visit with such a potentially provocative announcement.

WayneConrad
April 17, 2008, 10:16 AM
My friend's home is his castle. I carry openly, so it's no secret that I am armed. If he wishes for me not to carry, I will leave it in my car.

"Concealed means concealed" against someone's wishes would mean that I think it is alright to sneak onto a friend's property something that he has asked me not to bring. Nice way to treat a friend.

MechAg94
April 17, 2008, 10:32 AM
As a homeowner myself, I would say keep it concealed. If you can't keep it concealed, want to pull it out, or carry openly, you dang well better ask/notify me first.

Vitamin G
April 17, 2008, 10:35 AM
Anyone who enters my home without a weapon, will have one + paddle holster provided for them.

Big45
April 17, 2008, 10:42 AM
I carry everywhere. Even Jesus knows that.

Ghost Tracker
April 17, 2008, 10:58 AM
"Against someone's wishes" means you have discussed it with them or believe you know them well enough to guess. I simply prefer not to mention it. If THEY open the subject, I'll then respect their position. If not? Then I don't know their preference (but I DO know mine) so there's no issue.

If they were Christian Scientists, I wouldn't openly announce that I had an emergency dose of prescription medication in my jacket...but I wouldn't leave it in the car over concern that its unintended discovery would be seen as disrespect or insult as to their sovereignty in their own home. I believe this medication (or my handgun) can save my life in an unexpected emergency. They believe neither can save their's. If it's carried covertly on my person, IMHO, my person is still my "sovereign property" & my choices are still my own.

strat81
April 17, 2008, 11:02 AM
This is a "Don't ask; don't tell," situation.
Yup. That's my policy.

1KPerDay
April 17, 2008, 11:29 AM
Anyone who enters my home without a weapon, will have one + paddle holster provided for them.

Me too... I keep a big bucket of Glocks by the front door.

42
April 17, 2008, 12:06 PM
note to self must drop by whilst in the area lol and askl for handgun advice and advice on storage and protection of 2a rights I want it where I am.

TexasRifleman
April 17, 2008, 12:25 PM
Concealed means Concealed.

I don't normally ask my host if my underwear color offends them either.

Bazooka Joe71
April 17, 2008, 12:36 PM
Concealed means Concealed.

I don't normally ask my host if my underwear color offends them either.

I think your hot pink thongs are going to offend anyone!



:neener:

Elza
April 17, 2008, 12:47 PM
In my case it’s usually a non-question. Generally, anyone that knows me well enough to invite me into their home knows that I am A) a gunny and B) I carry.

However, if I was unsure I would ask. I’m real twitchy about my home and extend the same courtesy to others.

geekWithA.45
April 17, 2008, 12:57 PM
I carry concealed until asked not to. It's never been an issue yet.

And furthermore, if someone asked me not to, I'd think it damned strange, no different from someone asking me to leave me knife, wallet, or flashlight in the car.

TexasRifleman
April 17, 2008, 01:02 PM
I think your hot pink thongs are going to offend anyone!

Of that I have no doubt :)

They do work well for Mexican Carry however, but that's a different thread, hopefully without pics :)

Bennett Prescott
April 17, 2008, 01:26 PM
It's not about their comfort, or being polite. It's about your mutual safety. You'd sure as hell feel like a jackass if you needed it and left it in the car because they might have been iffy about it.

Concealed means concealed.

Now, if they know, and ask me not to carry, that's a very different situation.

DrewH
April 17, 2008, 01:42 PM
In my case, I carry under a jacket, at least in winter. I like to take the jacket off when inside, so concealed is not concealed.

If I know the person well and figure they won't object I keep it. If it is some comparative stranger I leave it in the car.

leathermanwave
April 17, 2008, 02:09 PM
Carry it concealed if they happen to see it and request that you do not carry it don't carry it. If you live in a state where it is required than ask.

PTK
April 17, 2008, 02:21 PM
Now, if they know, and ask me not to carry, that's a very different situation.

Yes, different entirely. To the point of "Well, I'm leaving. I won't be coming back."

ZeSpectre
April 17, 2008, 02:28 PM
Since the OP is asking about etiquette and not the law I'll tell you that this is one of those items where I take a decidedly hardline stance.

Friendship implies trust. I have a lot of "associates" but very few friends. I can't think of a single person who actually calls me "friend" who would be in the least concerned about my state of preparedness. Hell I've picked up their kids, housesat (with all of their worldy possessions in my care) loaned and borrowed cars/trucks/motorcycles. They've entrusted their lives to me by being a passenger in my car, on and on and on.

I had someone freak on me once and I told them I'd respect their wishes and I left (and now that I think about it I haven't been back since).

shdwfx
April 17, 2008, 02:38 PM
They have just as much "right" to irrationally moderate the wearing of boxers and briefs. But unless they impose a restriction, I wouldn't bother asking. Concealed items are really not necessary to discuss.

Since we are talking about edicate here, a home owner may have the right to militarize the property and strip search their guests, but it's not polite. Edicate restricts their "rights" here too.

Now, if the owner forbade me to wear briefs or guns or whatever while in his home, I doubt I'd go there again.

As far as rights...

4th Amendment
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated...

The right to be secure "in your persons" is listed right up there with houses and effects.

Bazooka Joe71
April 17, 2008, 03:32 PM
They do work well for Mexican Carry however, but that's a different thread, hopefully without pics

Not hopefully, but definitely.

Do what you wish on your own time, but banana hammocks are not welcome here at THR!

Your poor wife. :p

JesseL
April 17, 2008, 04:04 PM
"Wear a gun to someone else's house, you're saying, 'I'll defend this home as if it were my own.' When your guests see you carry a weapon, you're telling them,'I'll defend you as if you were my own family.' And anyone who objects levels the deadliest insult possible: 'I don't trust you unless you're rendered harmless'!" L. Neil Smith, The Probability Broach

yhtomit
April 17, 2008, 04:07 PM
I've never heard of the "must disclose to homeowner" provision, but then I don't live in Louisiana.

How many states have such clauses? I've never heard of such a thing wrt PA or TN, and though I'm early in the process, haven't noticed any provision like this for WA, either.

timothy

Winchester 73
April 17, 2008, 04:11 PM
Alaska,Louisiana and South Carolina are 3 states offhand.
There may be others where you must disclose to the homeowner/renter.

http://www.handgunlaw.us

romma
April 17, 2008, 04:11 PM
In Ct you do not have to disclose to anyone.

If someone posts no weapons signs, then you are obligated to comply.

rainbowbob
April 17, 2008, 04:16 PM
When at my friends I take it off and put it on the coffee table.

plexreticle:
Why would you give up control of your firearm in that way? Why not just leave it in the holster?


Washington State is not a "must disclose state" - and I will not announce to every home-owner upon entering their home that I am CCW. If their wishes are known to me - I will respect those wishes. That being said, I have disclosed my CCW to my daughter and brother, and was informed by them that they do not want firearms in their homes. In those cases, I leave it locked in the car.

SsevenN
April 17, 2008, 04:18 PM
Quote:
Anyone who enters my home without a weapon, will have one + paddle holster provided for them.

Me too... I keep a big bucket of Glocks by the front door.

ROFL

Wow Thanksgiving at your house must be awsome!

"alright Grams, your youngest son already took your prefferd holster. So I found you a nice shoulder holster and a criss cross pair of bandoliers....Remember there is no saftey on the tupperware!"

jlficken
April 17, 2008, 04:18 PM
I go with the whole "Don't ask Don't tell" policy myself.

Same here. If they don't ask they don't need to know. It isn't hurting anyone and if it's legal I don't see the problem.

Winchester 73
April 17, 2008, 04:20 PM
Quote:
When at my friends I take it off and put it on the coffee table.


I believe plexreticle was being humorous,rainbowbob.

rainbowbob
April 17, 2008, 04:25 PM
I believe plexreticle was being humorous, rainbowbob.

He may be joking - but I don't know until he tells me...that's why I asked him.

leathermanwave
April 17, 2008, 04:34 PM
"Wear a gun to someone else's house, you're saying, 'I'll defend this home as if it were my own.' When your guests see you carry a weapon, you're telling them,'I'll defend you as if you were my own family.' And anyone who objects levels the deadliest insult possible: 'I don't trust you unless you're rendered harmless'!" L. Neil Smith, The Probability Broach That is a awesome quote.:)

CNYCacher
April 17, 2008, 04:36 PM
I will always respect the wishes of the homeowner.

I also assume that everyone I know is rational.

FPrice
April 17, 2008, 04:37 PM
If the person would object seriously or would react badly if they knew that I had a firearm, I most likely would not be there in the first place. Unless it was someplace I had to go for good reason.

Winchester 73
April 17, 2008, 04:39 PM
He may be joking - but I don't know until he tells me...that's why I asked him.


Sorry.Did not mean to offend.:)
And plex may never check into this thread again.

Eyesac
April 17, 2008, 04:46 PM
I don't understand this question and why it keeps coming up. I'm completely opposed to Birkenstocks (those hippie sandles), but I don't do a Birkenstock check when some dude comes into my house...I don't have a "no Birkenstocks" sign on my door. If you are an otherwise reasonable guy, but you have been know to wear Birkenstocks, I will still let you into my house. If you are an unreasonable guy, Birkenstocks or not, you're not coming into my home. What's with people? These people who's homes are a "gun free zone" are just as silly as a "Birkenstock free zone" or a "Teva free zone" or a "silk thong free zone"..... Well you know what, I just made my home a "your house is a gun free zone, free zone"

TexasRifleman
April 17, 2008, 04:50 PM
...........

Mannlicher
April 17, 2008, 04:50 PM
sounds like its only an issue if you make it an issue. Just leave it be, and don't bring the subject up.

rainbowbob
April 17, 2008, 04:58 PM
Sorry. Did not mean to offend...And plex may never check into this thread again.

No offense taken - I was just hoping to hear from the person who made the statement. But you may be right about him never checking back.

dalepres
April 17, 2008, 09:23 PM
As with businesses, I assume I am unwelcome where my gun is unwelcome. That includes houses.

Otaku201
April 17, 2008, 10:30 PM
As a matter of safety, the gun always stays with me. When they greet me with a hug, I make sure to put my left arm under theirs so they don't feel it, from then on things go on as normal.

I'm thinking about moving to another state where some of my family lives, I've already talked to one of the church leaders and after one conversation, I've got their blessing to carry in church too.

TwitchALot
April 17, 2008, 11:00 PM
It is an issue in Arkansas because our notification requirement is bascially the same as Louisiana, you have to notify the home owner. Where it becomes a problem is when you have folks who typically carry out their businesses in other people's homes, like locksmiths and plumbers. Locksmiths in particular can get called at some pretty odd hours and go into some pretty bad places. I wish they would clean that portion of the code up, but the conflict between home owner's rights and CCW are kinda sticky. It would be better to avoid the issue altogether and leave it up to the permit holder, but I guess they had to include that to get it passed in the first place.

IMO, you shouldn't have to notify. If it is not explicitly prohibited to begin with, then it should be assumed that it is not prohibited, and if a home owner finds out and asks you to leave, the most they should be able to to do is kick you our of their home.


That said, there is no conflict between home owners rights and CCW (and to be clear, I'm not just directing this at you sac- this is a general address), and it is astounding that so many people feel otherwise. You do not have a right to be in someone else's home. You can either abide by their rules or leave. THR has seen this discussion many times, but quite frankly, if I were to go into your home (or anyone else's here) without their permission, and you pointed a gun at me and I shot you, would any of you defend my actions on the grounds of self-defense?

Of course not. How the hell can I have the right to self-defense in your home when I don't have the right to be in your home in the first place? The First Amendment doesn't allow me to assemble in your home and give a speech any more than the Second allows you to carry a gun in an anti's house. There is no conflict of rights whatsoever because you don't have a right to be on someone else's private property, period. If the owner grants you permission to be there and applies certain conditions (like keeping guns out of the house), then you can abide by that and get the permission to be there, or you can leave, because you don't have a right to be there in the first place. If you choose to accept the conditions and enter the home, you choose to accept the risks of disarming yourself, and therefore choose to accept the possible consequences of whatever may happen. If you don't think it's worth it, don't go in that person's house- you don't have a right to be there.


I'm sure everyone can derive my stance on the issue from here. :) Ignoring that aspect of it, however, it's rather rude to go on someone else's private property without their permission, no? Seems pretty clear cut to me.

MechAg94
April 17, 2008, 11:26 PM
If it was concealed, I would keep it that way. I don't know if there is any reason notify them unless you think you can't keep it concealed.

As I said before, In my home, keep it concealed and don't pull it out (not counting emergencies). It is not that I oppose your right to carry, I just don't want people I don't know handling firearms in my house without a little notification/permission. Keep it concealed. I have seen too many people make mistakes handle guns including people who know better.

plexreticle
April 18, 2008, 08:23 AM
plexreticle:
Why would you give up control of your firearm in that way? Why not just leave it in the holster?

The guns isn't out of control, it's on a table in the holster. I don't CC in my own house either. I guess I'm funny like that. K frame gets heavy after awhile. My friends are cool like that. :)

If I'm at a party or someone has kids or I'm not sure how they are about guns, I leave it at home or in the vehicle.

fearless leader
April 18, 2008, 10:24 AM
I can't say for sure if it's right or wrong, but this is what happened to me.

I met a girl at a celebration, my partner met her room mate, and my date's brother was too intoxicated to drive, but my date offered to drive us all to their house.;)

I had a perfectly good S&W Model 57, 41 Mag under the seat of my car, but decided it would be inappropriate to bring it to someone's home. I would live to regret it.

The brother and sister had a spat, about 3 blocks from their house. My partner and his date, began walking to the house and I followed, not wanting to get in a family squabble.

My date arrived about 10 minutes later, with the license plate to her brother's car in hand. (seems she paid for the plate).

The next morning, a man the size of Paul Bunyan was standing over us with a leg from a coffee table, ordering my date to give him the tag.:uhoh: She refused. He said, "your Brother is waiting outside with a rifle if you don't." She refused and the large man went outside to get a rifle.:what:

I told her to lock the door. She said it doesn't lock. That's how he got in.
I said call the police! She didn't have a phone! (This is about 1980)

I heard 2 shots from outside, and then he came in, pointing a Marlin 22 Semi auto (18 shot) at us, demanding the tag. She bent it in two!:eek: I asked if there was a peaceful solution to this, but he turned to me and said, "I done heard all I'm gonna hear outta you!"

He was pointing the rifle as a pistol, squeezing the trigger slowly, or so it seemed. I had no cover, I was in the middle of a large room. I couldn't charge him before he could pepper me with bullets. I was pretty well screwed!:eek::eek:

Just then, I heard someone say,"PUT THAT GUN DOWN, BUD!" He lowered his rifle, and I looked toward the door, and Sampson County's finest came to my rescue, but I would have felt better if they came to a "shots fired" call with their guns in hand! At NO TIME did they make the thug put down his weapon and he continued to carry it, finger on the trigger, cocked and loaded, while the officers' guns remained in their holsters. :banghead:

So the neighbors called when they heard the shots. I will not make that mistake again. I will carry, loaded, covertly if necessary, in anyone's house I am invited into.

Pilgrim
April 18, 2008, 10:36 AM
Don't ask, don't tell.

buck00
April 18, 2008, 10:38 AM
Concealed means concealed.(yes we know.)I carry.

Right on. Concealed means concealed, end of story.

If 2 armed guys in ski-masks kick in the front door during dinner and you shoot them both down, do you really think the friend is going to say "HOW DARE YOU BRING A PISTOL INTO MY HOME!!? YOU BETRAYED MY TRUST!!!" Would that be their reaction after you just saved their family from rape, robbery, and death? :rolleyes:

Other than that there would be no reason to reveal you were carryng. If you "show" or can get "made" easily- that is your own problem of not finding a method that makes it 100 percent invisible.

ochmude
April 18, 2008, 12:05 PM
If you happen to live in a state that does not require you to disclose to the homeowner (unlike Massachusetts, which does...I hate my state), and you are in the home of someone who is not extremely familiar with firearms, how would you feel about this as an opportunity to introduce someone to shooting and firearms ownership. There are a LOT of people that really don't even know that you can legally carry to protect yourself. They may not be anti, just simply unaware. You'd obviously have to play each situation by ear, but I think it might be worth a shot. And just to belay people's concerns, I'm not suggesting you pull out your CCW and have a show and tell with a condition 1 weapon. More of a conversation starter..."Yes, I am armed right now. I'm not crazy, I'm not seconds away from going on a murderous rampage, I'm not paranoid, I'm just prepared for something that I hope never happens. And, you can be too."

stevelyn
April 18, 2008, 12:10 PM
Alaska requires that you seek the homeowner's permission to carry on their property, but I don't hang out with the types that would object anyway, so it isn't a big deal for me.

gym
April 18, 2008, 01:08 PM
I just had a similar situation two nights ago, when meeting the parents of my step daughters fiance. the father of the groom to be, is an older Chap in his around 70. Everything was normal, 3 of us were talking, and the subject of guns somehow came up, he was adimatelly anti-gun. He asked my opinion, and since my step daughter is aware that I always carry, and everyone other than the Father of the groom, as I took the future son in law, to a gun show. I told him the truth, and his eyes almost fell out of his head, to top it off the guy is an ex Marine, who fought in Korea. I think that is why, he saw his friends killed there, and never got over it, but one would think that would make it even more acceptable tha a non military type. As I explained Florida's gun laws to him, he sat there shaking his head, and said, I may have to leave this state. Im not kidding, he got so upset, I couldn't believe it. On the other hand his wife and daughter, pulled me on the side and told me that they,his daughters and wife, have gone shooting and not told him. I have the feeling, that when we go to his house, I will be asked to not bring a gun. So I hope he will understand why I won't be coming over. This is the first time that this has happened in all the years (35), that I have carried but I don't go where I can't carry. Unless it's on the list of places that are restricted by law.

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