Don't teach the baby about guns.


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Sato Ord
April 18, 2008, 11:09 AM
My wife knew I owned and intended to keep firearms when she met me. She was never an anti, but she was a confirmed pacifist. I took her shooting and she learned to do a halfway decent job with my Taurus model 85.

Later, when she was pregnant the subject of guns came up. (Did you know that pediatricians actually ask if there are guns in the house these days?)

Anyway, she said she didn't want our child running around with toy guns and playing violent games. She wasn't so much worried about him becoming violent, as she was about other people's perception of him being violent.

I know, I know, it doesn't make a whole lot of sense, but it wasn't worth arguing at that point. I knew then and I know now, boys will be boys.

Well, the boy is extremely intelligent and was hyper-verbal right from the start. His command of language was incredible at 18 months old. However, he had never even heard the word "GUN". It simply wasn't part of his vocabulary.

One day he was in the yard playing. I was cooking on the grill, and my wife was watching him while setting the table. She turned her back on him for just a second and when she turned back around he had picked up a fallen stick that looked amazingly like a rifle stock. He had the thing to his shoulder (good form, too!), was pointing it at a tree and saying POW-POW.:uhoh:

The kid was 18 months old and had never seen a gun in his young life! All of my guns had been carefully stored in cases since before he was born! He didn't even know the word "gun", because my wife had insisted he not get such an education too early!:rolleyes:

So, she asked him, "Connor, what are you doing?"

His reply was, "Hunting."

He had never heard me talking about hunting either. Remember, we lived so far out in the boonies we only got the local PBS channel on the TV, and mostly only at night. He'd never watched commercial TV either. Never seen a cop show, never seen a hunting show.:what:

She decides to continue her questions, keeping her tone vary neutral, "Connor, what is that you have there?"

He looks at her a bit perplexed, and you can see he is actively trying to find a word to sum up his "toy". He finally shrugs slightly and says, "It's my 'HUNTER', I use it for hunting."

Couldn't fault the kid's logic!:D

Boys will be boys, and human beings will find a way to make weapons out of what they can find in their environment. That's the reason we are at the top of the food chain but don't have long teeth and claws.

PS Becoming a mother has taken the wind out of the pacifist sails. If someone wants to hurt my son they might just find that my wife is ready, willing, and able to drill them a .380 whole in center mass. Now-a-days she is determined to defend herself and her family with any means necessary.

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Tommygunn
April 18, 2008, 11:17 AM
"Out of the mouths of babes ... "

Great story!

ambush
April 18, 2008, 11:20 AM
I love it!! Another hunter in the ranks.

Sindawe
April 18, 2008, 11:20 AM
18 months eh? Hmmmm...that strikes me as about right for bleed over from prior incarnations to register in the brain of the current incarnation. Your Connor may be remembering past exploits bringing down game and love of fine weapons. He's at the same age I was when I had my first such experience of past life memories, though mine not so enjoyable and honorable as hunting.

Now-a-days she is determined to defend herself and her family with any means necessary.

I rather face a hord of rabid Grizzlies than a one mother defending her young.

HammerBite
April 18, 2008, 11:23 AM
One of the things that amazed me about parenthood is how quickly kids learn things.

CountGlockula
April 18, 2008, 11:24 AM
Get that baby a toy rifle NOW!!! He's good to go.

Good story.

Voodoochile
April 18, 2008, 11:27 AM
My wife was the same way when she was pregnant with our first, she knew that I was a hunter, had a small collection of firearms & regularly shot them as well as my archery gear, but when 911 come about her dad wanted to be sure that we were prepared in the armes department, that was when our discussions about firearms come about.

Although my wife isn't big on guns she does shoot on occasion & has as of this year allowed me to start teaching my lil 6 year old, but like your lil boy she had allready had it in her head about shooting something.

good story & thanx for sharing...

Navy_Guns
April 18, 2008, 11:40 AM
Time to send off for a copy of the NRA "Eddie the Eagle" video.... My little guy is almost 4 and he asks me to watch Eddie with him every couple weeks. It works, too - He found a Mossberg butt stock in my office last week and came and told me he had found a gun part. :)

JesseL
April 18, 2008, 11:48 AM
My son is the same age right now, 18 months.

He's not nearly that articulate, but he does enjoy sitting on my lap and looking at American Rifleman. He enjoys pointing at the pictures and listening to me tell him what they are.

Interestingly, he has uncanny attraction to all the Kimber ads.:)

K3
April 18, 2008, 11:51 AM
Interestingly, he has uncanny attraction to all the Kimber ads.

I'm sure it's him with the attraction... :D

Elza
April 18, 2008, 11:53 AM
HammerBite: One of the things that amazed me about parenthood is how quickly kids learn things.And many of those things can be embarrassing to the parents! :eek:

t3rmin
April 18, 2008, 02:16 PM
Dang. That's a pretty amazing kid you have there. My 18-mo-old looks at a motorcycle and says "rmm rmm", can point out most of his body parts, and can tell you what James Brown says ("haayyy!"). He's no dummy, but he's a long way from full sentences. They're all unique, aren't they?

It's pretty sobering what they pick up that you AREN'T trying to teach them!

Technosavant
April 18, 2008, 02:19 PM
I find that those who refuse to allow firearm education of children are all in favor of education when it comes to any and every other part of life. They have a huge gun shaped blind spot in their reasoning.

Education never hurts, but a lack of knowledge can put your rear in a potentially lethal sling. On a number of topics.

JohnnyGrey
April 18, 2008, 02:58 PM
Yes, baby boys will gravitate towards completely different things than baby girls will. You can't make a boy a girl or vice versa, and his mother shouldn't discourage his instincts (though it's all the rage these days). Buy the kid a Nerf gun or something and he'll have a head start on muzzle awareness. Mommy should be glad that he didn't point his hunter at her! :neener:

glocker82
April 18, 2008, 03:02 PM
yeah skip right to hand grenades. Sorry I didn't even read the post only the title.

Hot brass
April 18, 2008, 03:42 PM
Bought my son a .22 when he was 3 years old. A Red Ryder for his 5th b-day. A .177 pellet gun for his 9th b-day. A 10-22 for his 10 th b-day. Another .177 pellet gun for his 13 th b-day and an 870 this month.

The daughter has a Red Ryder, and a .22 bought before she was born.

Mr White
April 18, 2008, 04:00 PM
The kid was 18 months old and had never seen a gun in his young life! ... He didn't even know the word "gun...

...

Never seen a cop show, never seen a hunting show.
You know, in some states, perhaps even in parts of Florida, that is considered child abuse. The authorities could take your kid and send him off to a foster family of rednecks.

jakemccoy
April 18, 2008, 04:11 PM
That's a cool story. Really, how do you think he learned that stuff? I'll keep it a secret. ;)

Tom Bri
April 18, 2008, 04:28 PM
My daughter, aged about two I guess, made a lego 'gun' to shoot the big bad wolf with....

Later she decided that the wolf had got a bad rap, and felt sorry for it. In MY version of the story, the wolf ended up as dinner in the pot and a nice lap rug for Grandma.

The Lone Haranguer
April 18, 2008, 05:45 PM
We guys are wired that way. ;)

telkontar
April 18, 2008, 05:48 PM
My wife called me at work to say she had talked with the Principal of my kindergarten son's school. He had told the teacher his finger hurt and it was a little scraped.
"How did that happen?" she asked him.
"On my daddy's gun."
Wednesday we had taken my 35-year-old Daisy BB gun in the backyard to "hunt" birds. In attempting to cock the gun, the spring snapped the lever back on his finger and scraped some skin off.
Two years ago after a hunting trip to North Dakota, he was found pointing the BB gun out the window. "The birds want to fly away, but we just want to eat them!" he exclaimed.
He'll know how to shoot. [I don't leave the BB gun in range for him anymore.]

boatbod
April 18, 2008, 07:55 PM
When my 21 month old son sees one of my guns, he instantly starts saying "bang, bang". The weird thing is that we didn't teach him that word, he just started mimicking the sound. Can't wait until he tries out that at daycare :what:, especially if he follows up with the word "gun". (Luckily it sounds more like "gum" at the moment)

doc2rn
April 18, 2008, 08:01 PM
Yes, baby boys will gravitate towards completely different things than baby girls will.
JG dont bet on it my little girl wants to go shooting with daddy, and I was so proud I almost wept. I went straight to the store and bought an American made BB/ Pellet gun. I can scale back my range time to bring another shooter into the group.

Atticus
April 18, 2008, 09:35 PM
Cool story. Your wife has a good point though. I used to be pretty open with my kids about my guns, till they started telling everyone at school about all my guns- especially the 'machine guns' (actually an AR15 and SKS). Believe me, whatever you tell or show him will soon be known to everyone. And it's hard to teach a very young one about discretion.

Scanr
April 18, 2008, 10:39 PM
I am more worried about the "cartoons" kids see, then the gun on my hip or the guns in the safe the see now and again.

possom813
April 18, 2008, 10:49 PM
Yes, baby boys will gravitate towards completely different things than baby girls will. You can't make a boy a girl or vice versa

I'm not so sure about that, unless I've just got a daughter that's strange. She loves the outdoors, she understands the firearms and that she's not to discuss our firearms with anyone other than me or the wife. She also loves the 4 wheeler and the big orange truck(69 Chevy 4x4 on 36 inch tires)

Believe me, whatever you tell or show him will soon be known to everyone. And it's hard to teach a very young one about discretion.

I don't believe that discretion is difficult to teach a young child, provided that you take the time to talk to the kid. My oldest daughter just turned 5 and understands that she isn't to tell anyone about the guns in the house, and if anyone ever asks her about guns and if daddy has any she's to tell them she doesn't know and to ask daddy.

distra
April 18, 2008, 10:52 PM
Yep, my son has been saying "Pow-Pow" since he could talk (he is now almost 3). We have not made any attempt to "hide" our firearms from him. They are locked up and secured, but he does see them when we go to the range. I think people make a mistake by trying to hide firearms. Kids understand more than we can image at such an early age. Our son has no toy guns, he uses the vacuum hose attachment to shoot "clay birds". :D The thing is he has only seen me shoot skeet once! Believe it or not he has pretty good "muzzle" descipline with his vacuum hose. Makes a shooting mom and dad proud (wiping that tear). Kids will pick-up sticks or you name it they can turn it into a firearm. Biggest thing we do is teach the difference between the real deal and the stick. You don't touch the real deal and keep that stick pointed in a safe direction at all times. Point the stick at someone or the dog, stick goes away and kid sits in time out for a minute or two. They learn real quick not to point that stick at someone. Never too early to teach safety.

Great story. My wife did the same thing after my son was born. Got her permit, got some training and can shoot very well. She'd rip someone apart if they tried to hurt the kid, worse than grizzle bear. :uhoh: It's an estrogen thing I think.;)

Eyesac
April 18, 2008, 11:05 PM
"It's my 'HUNTER', I use it for hunting."

That warms my heart.

Atticus
April 30, 2008, 02:42 PM
[QUOTE][/My oldest daughter just turned 5 and understands that she isn't to tell anyone about the guns in the house, QUOTE]

Let's see how that holds up for the next 10 years...particularly when she's at school.

cmidkiff
April 30, 2008, 03:13 PM
My daughters, now ages 12, 14, 15, and 20, are all decent shots. Some are more interested in going to the range than others, but given the opportunity, all enjoy a day at the range.

They were exposed to firearms from a very early age. Attempting to hide something from a child is seldom successful.

I started them shooting between 9 and 11, depending on each one's temperament, interest, and ability to follow instruction. I've enjoyed my range time with the girls as much as anything we've ever done together.

Kids don't learn language without an example... your son picked up the words, actions, and sounds from somewhere. Seems like it's time for Eddie Eagle!

Picard
April 30, 2008, 03:24 PM
Cute story. Smart kid you have there.

primlantah
April 30, 2008, 03:25 PM
cartoons? daycare? playmates?

my parents didnt teach me how to cuss, spit, or fistfight... most bad things kids learn is when they are away from the house and out of parental supervision.

with that said teach your kid about guns. Why? so he doesn't find yours and remember that bugs bunny/elmer fudd cartoon and have an accident. teach him safety not abstinence... that way he can make an educated decision regarding his actions and interesting things he finds around the house(or at a friends house). I have worked with a lot of kids between ages 1-4 when i worked at a day care(so you know im not just making this up).

larry_minn
April 30, 2008, 03:48 PM
18 months eh? Hmmmm...that strikes me as about right for bleed over from prior incarnations to register in the brain of the current incarnation. Your Connor may be remembering past exploits bringing down game and love of fine weapons. He's at the same age I was when I had my first such experience of past life memories, though mine not so enjoyable and honorable as hunting

Myself I still remember snakes in my crib. (as in baby crib) and large python type snakes coiled around the "posts" on my parents bed (that their bed did NOT have) and having to fight them off long before I could even speak.
My parents couldn't figure out why I could NOT sleep in the crib at night no matter what. Lights on/off/crib moved into their bedroom/another room/ following parenting advice to NOT do anything and let me scream till I quit. (never worked) Until I was in their bed and had "secured" it nobody got any sleep.
Finally I could "explain" my actions. Mom says there is no way I could know about snakes (not common in my area) we only had one TV channel that only sometimes worked and they never watched anytihing like that. According to my parents it is IMPOSSIBLE I could have seen/know about snakes but I did. (one of few things I still remember from then) (ok only thing)

rainbowbob
April 30, 2008, 04:24 PM
I am very close to my 3-year-old grandson and spend at least one day a week with him. He loves his grandma - but he follows me ("gampa") around like a puppy and wants to do everything I do. “We're boys”, he says. “That's right”, I say.

I have posted elsewhere about the edict I received from his mother and father (my daughter and son-in-law) insisting I don't CCW around my grandson. I agreed to compromise by leaving my gun locked in the car when at their house, and keeping my gun on a high shelf in the closet (but available) when he is at my house.

Regardless, this is a boy who will make a "gun" out of a piece of toast. In addition, his parents have bought him nerf guns and other such toys and don't really restrict what he sees on TV - so he's getting real mixed messages.

When he is with me and is playing with some form of toy gun, I instruct him to only shoot it at bad guys. I've repeatedly told him that if he sees a gun that isn't his toy to not touch it, to leave the area, and to tell a grown-up. Then I make him repeat it back to me, which he does in the same solemn tone I used.

My point here is that no matter what the parents do or say to "shield" a child from guns, they are going to be exposed to them, and are going to be curious and interested. So the earlier a child discusses it rationally with an adult who is knowledgeable about gun safety - the safer they are going to be.

As a corollary example: We have a small in-ground swimming pool and I have taught him to never go near it without me standing by - and I do not give him the opportunity to do so. In addition, I started teaching him to swim when he was still in diapers (well, actually I removed the diapers). At three he can hold his breath, swim under water by himself, and swim to the ladder.

Knowledge = Safety - Ignorance = Danger

P.S. I have a Remington .22 semi with a scope that I can't WAIT to share with him! It will probably be a few years before he and I can whittle down his parent's attitude. I will respect their wishes because they are good parents and it is their call.

McCall911
April 30, 2008, 05:06 PM
Great story!

I've heard several anecdotes about small children that really make me wonder if there isn't something to the Hindu/Buddhist karma-and-rebirth theory. :scrutiny: This is another!

chupacabrah
May 1, 2008, 08:19 AM
hopefully it will go that well for me..... my daughter is currently 4 months...and the wife is already telling me i cant CCW.

although...now that she works at night she said she might have to get her CCW, or at least some mace because it's scary. whereas before she was saying it was "unnecessary" and carrying a gun is a "false sense of security".

pffft!

Im283
May 1, 2008, 08:46 AM
my grandson is 5.5 and is all about some guns.

he has had toy guns since he was old enough to sit and play.

I bought him his first real gun last week, We shot it all weekend. Though a youth model it is a real rifle. Single shot, and his grandkids ought to be shooting it someday with proper care.

He knows the four rules and understands trigger discipline.

The best part is he has a younger brother I get to brain wash too! LOL

TheLastBoyScout
May 1, 2008, 08:57 AM
:D

Good story.

Copy. Paste.

:evil:

Forward to extremely liberal long-term girlfriend.;)

RLsnow
May 1, 2008, 09:02 AM
Knowledge is power! :D

Lupinus
May 1, 2008, 09:14 AM
amazing what good genetics can do

RoadkingLarry
May 1, 2008, 09:24 AM
Much easier to gun-proof* kids than it is to kid-proof guns.



*by gun-proof I mean teach them what is proper.

hankdatank1362
May 1, 2008, 09:41 AM
"It's my hunter." That's too friggin cute.

My 3 1/2 y.o. boy has been calling firearms "big booms" for about two years now. When I let him look down the scope of my .30-'06 and dry fire *click*, I yell BANG! And he replies, ecstatically "I shot a deer!"

Navy_Guns
May 1, 2008, 10:28 AM
My son will be four this month. I let him play with his Legos this week next to me while I was working on assembling my new FAL. So, of course he builds a lego "gun", pointing to one piece while explaining that "it is the shooter part, where the missiles come out to shoot bad guys."

If only I could use one of his Legos for my locking shoulder... I had to order a custom one.

MechAg94
May 1, 2008, 10:49 AM
My Dad always insisted my brother and I not point our toy guns at people also. He would tells us to imagine enemies to shoot, not each other. You would be surprised how well that habit carries over.

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