Lee powder scale


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DWS1117
August 14, 2003, 01:32 PM
At least for now, I am stuck with this miserable excuse for a scale. Does anyone have any ideas how I can keep that little brass calibration knob from moving? Or, at the least from moving so easily.

Loaded up 10 rounds with a new powder and had to pull every one. What I thought was 3.9gr. was really 5.9 – 6gr. :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

Lesson learned : ALWAYS check that the scale is zeroed. I am guessing that this applies to any scale not just this abomination.

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Mike Irwin
August 14, 2003, 02:00 PM
Piece of tape, perhaps?

Lochaber
August 14, 2003, 02:54 PM
How rough are you on it? Mine seems to stay at zero quite well.

Loch

DWS1117
August 14, 2003, 04:09 PM
Well, I think I am fairy gentle. The knob is very loose.

I'll try the tape Idea.

MrPhil
August 14, 2003, 05:31 PM
Put a tiny little drop of linseed oil on the threads. Initially it will act as a lube, but after some exposure to the air, it will get a little sticky and act as a thread locker. This is an old bicycle/motorcycle wheel building trick. You'll still be able to turn the wheel, but only when you want it to turn.

mparris71
August 14, 2003, 06:47 PM
Lee's Scale are a pain, But are quite accurate. When I was using one I had to check zero every time I used the scale. Which isn't a bad idea with any scale.

DillHarris
August 14, 2003, 07:02 PM
mparris71 hit the nail on the head. I use the lee scale and don't find it too "user friendly". When I got it with my kit I was gonna just junk it from the get go. Then I checked it with a weight check set. I checked weights from 1.5 grains to 77 grains and everything in between. It was right on through the whole range.

But that's not what you're talking about. If your zero is loose, it's gonna drift. Round #1 will be right on and round #150 could be well over max and reading the same as round #1. I would consider it a safety liability and talk to Lee. The scale should at least hold zero until you move it (or bump it). If you move a scale, you have to rezero. Until you can get the problem fixed, at the very least recheck zero when you're done weighing your charges.

Best of luck.

Dill

Mike Irwin
August 15, 2003, 12:14 AM
This isn't a "Lee Safety Scale" is it? The cheap ??? POS plastic thing?

If it is, hit it with a heavy hammer. Repeatedly.

The bite the bullet and get a REAL scale.

Those damned Safety Scales should be renamed "overload specials."

Lord what pieces of :cuss:

DWS1117
August 15, 2003, 12:42 AM
Yep. its a a "Lee Safety Scale". I am planning on getting anything else, but untill I can squeeze the cash out of an already tight budget I am looking for a temporary fix.

bogie
August 15, 2003, 12:01 PM
Treated and used properly, the "crappy" Lee scale is considerably more accurate than the Dillon/Ohaus that I gave Oleg, and a great deal more reliable than my BBK. Oil those threads, and check your zero occasionally, and don't bang the thing around.

MrPhil
August 15, 2003, 12:11 PM
I've gotta agree with the other guys. The Lee scale, while being very inexpensive, is very accurate. I've got an expensive RCBS/Ohaus scale that will not zero. Try the linseed oil trick. It will keep "zero" from drifting.

DWS1117
August 15, 2003, 04:46 PM
Where can one purchase some of this linsead oil?

MrPhil
August 15, 2003, 09:07 PM
Sorry for the oversight. Try a paint store or an art supply store. Linseed oil is the base for artist's oil paints. When exposed to air it crosslinks and eventually (several years) becomes quite hard. For our purposes, it acts like a very weak thread locker. Cheaper and safer than Locktite. It can be used to keep threaded fasteners from vibrating loose, but still operable. That being said, when I want a screw to stay put, I use super glue!:D

DWS1117
August 15, 2003, 11:25 PM
Super glue may be a tad bit overboard.:D I think I will just stick woth the linseed oil. Thanks for the tip.

lee n. field
August 17, 2003, 11:21 PM
At least for now, I am stuck with this miserable excuse for a scale. Does anyone have any ideas how I can keep that little brass calibration knob from moving? Or, at the least from moving so easily.

A drop of rubber cement, threadlocker or teflon tape? Pester Lee into replacing it. Buy a new one.

I don't have the problem you have. When I finally bought some check weights, I found that the scale was right on.

My only problems are that it's finecky to use, and only weighs up to 100 grains. (I've got a bag full of cast lead .45 bullets I'd like to use, but don't know what they weigh.)

Steve Smith
August 18, 2003, 10:11 AM
If you put anything (grease, tape, etc) on the scale you will change the weight that is measured!

Mike Irwin
August 18, 2003, 12:22 PM
"If you put anything (grease, tape, etc) on the scale you will change the weight that is measured!"

Probably by such an insignificant amount that it's not measurable within the scale's precision range unless you REALLY glop it on.

Time to do some experimentation when I get hom.e

Lochaber
August 18, 2003, 02:20 PM
Well, you will change its zero point, but thats it. If you re-zero it with the goo/tape/oil/glue in place you should be fine. Thats the whole point of having a zero adjustment, otherwise bits left in diiferent places from casting the plastic will have the same effect. No two scales are going to zero the same way due to differences in the materials. Adding a bit more on on side, means you will have to move the zero counterwieght to balance it, but that why its there.

Unless 3 semesters of college physics where completely wasted on me and I am very wrong, which I guess is possible.

Loch

MrPhil
August 19, 2003, 01:33 AM
. . . with or without 3 semesters of college physics. I've used balances (what mechanical powder "scales" really are) since 1976. The key word here is "balance". At zero, a balance should, well, it should balance. Adding a small mass to the zero screw does not change how the balance works, just moves the screw's zero position. Now, if you were to change the distance of the pan from the fulcrum (pivot point), THAT would destroy your scale's accuracy. A balance relies on known proportions between its sides to achieve accurate measurement.


edit: I originally said "pivot poing".

Pumpkinheaver
August 19, 2003, 11:04 AM
I have 2 scales a lee and an rcbs, both lose their zero's if I move them around very much so it's not just something with the lee.

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