Where Do I Get Reloading Data .......


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Master of Arms
April 21, 2008, 05:35 PM
Where can I get some reloading data that will give me the stats with more than just the max load?
If I load a 180 grain BTSP and use X amount of powder I get XXXX velocity/XXXX energy/XXXX bullet drop but what if I change the powder load? What I`m saying is that I need a chart that will give me those numbers with different powder loads.
I`ve tried HODGDON and they only list two loads and one of those is the max. Where can I get such info?:confused:

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Asherdan
April 21, 2008, 05:56 PM
When looking for Hornady bullet data I give 'em a call and they'll send over something like this (http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z120/Asherdan93/Hornady240XTP_265XTP44Mag.jpg). I rarely see more than min and max data published on line (or in my Lyman 48th) so if I'm looking for a specific velocity I get the chrony out and work up to it in my rifle. For example, my rifle is running considerably faster when I tested it out than that 44 mag data I linked to. Now, you can look for approximate data as a pointer, as I posted, but it's really going to be an approximation only due to differences between your firearm/component lots/weather conditions and the test conditions.

If you don't have/want a chrony you'll have to do it the old (sometimes better) way and make up lots and test for accuracy, then fire at various ranges to see what they do until you map out the load that works for what you need. I say that way is sometimes better because it's all too tempting to see the nice 100 yard group and the chrony reading and then use a ballistics program to guesstimate what it should do further down range instead of working it out fully.

Walkalong
April 21, 2008, 06:09 PM
Start and max charges with velocities and sometimes pressure is the norm.

jfh
April 21, 2008, 06:26 PM
I think what needs to be pointed out here is that the lower / first charge listed is the "start" of a recipe range up to the higher / second, which is the MAX charge.

Using the specifications provided--the case, primer, powder and bullet--assembled properly gave the load publisher the results listed. It is reasonable to assume some components are equivalent--i.e., different brands of cases and primers, and many bullets.

Now, it is up to the reloader to try loads within the range of charge weights provided to meet his particular goals. You may want to build some test loads in consistent increments to see which works best in your (hand)gun. When I start with a new powder, I built "load development" cartridges in which assembly details and components remain the same, and only the charge weight varies. For example, I build 10 rounds at 5.0 grains, 10 rounds at 5.2 grains, etc., up to the MAX charge listed (or less, depending on my criteria / goal).

Sometimes the components you use may not be directly comparable--for example, you have a recipe for a JHP / HSP bullet, but are using a cast lead bullet. The reloader's "rule of thumb" figures lead bullets take about a half-grain less to drive to the same velocity as the jacketed bullet. So, if I load a cast bullet, I consider the MAX charge to be .5 gr. less--at least until I can evaluate the overall quality of the reload.

Jim H.

steve4102
April 21, 2008, 08:09 PM
What manuals do you have?

mek42
April 21, 2008, 09:47 PM
Jim H.

I don't know that it is fair to say that different brands of primers may be equivalent, especially not near max loads.

Master of Arms
April 22, 2008, 12:39 AM
What manuals do you have?

I don`t have any real manuals. I print the info from the internet onto photo paper.

I have the ballistic chart and various reloading chart for each of my firearms. I`ve just came up with the most awsome load that I`ve ever created and I`m anxious to get the stats on it. I just fired at some 8 inch targets @ 412 yards about an hour ago to finish the testing. The results were absolutely perfect. I`ve been reloading for only about 2 or 3 years. I enjoy getting that perfect bullet. To me, that`s what its all about. Most anyone can reload but I load my rifle loads individually by hand {no machines} including a pre-weight of powder before each load and I guess you could say that I take pride in my ammo. I have a cheap press and some hand trimming tools. I`d really like a better, more accurate device to measure and load my powder because mine is a booger to use. I am new at the reloading compared to many people but I`ve loaded close to a thousands rounds, including pistol loads, with my single press. I know that this probably doesn`t compare with alot of guys but I`ve always taken my time and payed very close attention to detail. Any advice on reloading is always welcomed here so fire away.

I don't know that it is fair to say that different brands of primers may be equivalent, especially not near max loads.

I use CCI Magnum Primers with my 7 mag and 300 mag loads.

cpttango30
April 22, 2008, 08:53 AM
I don`t have any real manuals.

STOP RIGHT THERE. You need to get some reloading maunals. Looking for info on the net is all fine and well but You have nothing to compaire it to.

Get yourself a Sierra Manual and the ABC's of reloading. Then you should be off to a good start. Look on Amazon.com you cna find some really good deals on there.

The info you are wanting is in just about every reloading manual out there.

USSR
April 22, 2008, 12:42 PM
Where can I get some reloading data that will give me the stats with more than just the max load?
If I load a 180 grain BTSP and use X amount of powder I get XXXX velocity/XXXX energy/XXXX bullet drop but what if I change the powder load? What I`m saying is that I need a chart that will give me those numbers with different powder loads.
I`ve tried HODGDON and they only list two loads and one of those is the max. Where can I get such info?

MoA,

As previously stated, get yourself some reloading manuals. Also, most of them will only give you a minimum starting point, and their lawyer-vetted, so-called maximum load. If you don't have a chronograph and don't know how to read pressure signs, do not exceed their maximum load. The whole vast area between the minimum starting load and the maximum load is your playground. There is no substitution for load development. Also, if the reloading manual gives a velocity for a certain load, rest assured that your rifle with that load WILL NOT produce that velocity. At some point, spend a little $$$ and get yourself a chronograph. They can be had for less than $100, and should be part of every reloaders tool kit.

Don

Master of Arms
April 22, 2008, 01:59 PM
Looking for info on the net is all fine and well but You have nothing to compaire it to.

Guys, the information that I`m getting from the net is identicle to the information in the manuals. Actually, a person can get a wider range of info from the net. I don`t get the info from "tomdickandharry.net" I get my load info from places like Hodgdon reloading data center,etc. I read alot of info on the reloading process on equivalent, various sites. My friend has a few reloading manuals and the information in the manuals comes up short compared to the information in my reloading room. I`ve got more info on each of my calibers than any manual I`ve ever seen. The only thing that I can`t find is an estimate of different powder loads on the same grain lead. I understand the concept of reloading fully but I also appreciate the concern that you guys immediately portrayed. I figured that the "no manuals" comment would draw such comments. I`m not ignorant of the steps in reloading, I just think that the powder companies should post a few more estimates. I can`t afford a chrony at the moment but I`m thinking seriously about buying one.

I`ll give you the steps that I take when loading my target rifle loads:

1- examine each spent cartridge closely for crack, nicks etc. as I, very lghtly, use the finest steel wool to remove any "tarnish"
2- calibrate the width in the center, length, etc. to insure that no bulging or swelling has occured.
3- remove the primer and resize with PLENTY of lube to insure a smooth, even stroke on each casing for consistency.
4- clean the primer seat until it is TOTALLY clean.
5- measure the overall length and always knock the rough edge off of the mouth or port end of the casing also trim for overall length.
6- evenly trim inner and outer on the casing for perfect bullet seating.
7- clean the inside of the casing with a Q-tip.
8- add primers
9- weigh 2-3 loads of powder before I actually make my first load.
10- insert lead and load a single round.
11- calibrate my first load with a diagram such as this> http://www.6mmbr.com/cartridgediagrams.html#300WM
12- weigh dummy load in between every 2-3 loads to insure consistency
13- examine and calibrate each round when finished
14- clean each round with dry cloth.

My loads look new and shoot straighter than any production round. I have some video of my loads in action I just can`t figure out how to upload the file from my camcorders hard drive to my cpu and convert the file tthat can be sent . I`ve never loaded a video file on THR. I don`t even know if it`s possible.

rcmodel
April 22, 2008, 02:02 PM
I don`t have any real manuals.That right there might be your problem!

rcmodel

Ceemack
April 22, 2008, 02:27 PM
I've seen comments from others who never bothered to buy a paper reloading manual. Most of them just watched the Dillon video, got a recipe from someplace, and figured they knew all they needed to know.

People like that scare the hell out of me, and I always pray that they don't get the bay next to mine when I go to the range. You can never talk them into going back to the beginning and filling in the missing gaps in their knowledge, because they don't know exactly how much they don't know.

There's a lot more in a reloading manual than load data. Most of us not only keep a manual around, but buy the new versions as they come out. Speer just brought out a new version of their reloading manual, so this might be a good opportunity to spend the 28 bucks or so.

As for velocities between the starting load and the maximum load, as far as I know nobody publishes that. RCBS has an electronic reloading manual that they sell for about $100 that might give you what you're looking for. But for that money you could pick up a Chrony F1 and still have money left to spend on a tripod.

You'll find that the velocities you see listed in the manuals don't match the actual performance of the loads. If you really want to know the velocity of the load, a chronograph is the only way to be sure.

Master of Arms
April 22, 2008, 03:37 PM
comments from others who never bothered to buy a paper reloading manual. Most of them just watched the Dillon video

Did I miss something? Who`s Dillon? lol
The dangers in reloading are factual but there are many myths also. The most dangerous aspects of reloading would be the powder charge, mixing powders, faulty brass, and improper sizing . You don`t have to BUY a name brand manual to reload. Most of the manuals that I`ve read are more advertisements than anything else. There is more data online about reloading than a person could remember in years but I can see why it would be nice to have the Speer manual. You`d have one book for everything or would you? Looks like it`s a chrony for me. Oh yeah, as for the dangers: http://www.speer-bullets.com/default.asp?s1=5&s2=31
http://www.speer-bullets.com/default.asp?s1=5&s2=19

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