Using Imperial Sizing Wax


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lordgroom
April 22, 2008, 12:07 PM
Going to start relaoding rifle (.223) for an AR-15. I plan to full length re-size first and then use my RCBS X-Die for additional reloading sessions. I have never re-loaded Rifle in the past, only handgun. How is ISW used? I see the directions to tap your finger in the wax and run your finger on the case. Is this correct? Should I be concerned to spread the wax over all of the case? How much attention should I take to completely cover the case? Will the procedure change when I use the X-Die, in other words Do I coat the neck and shoulder when using the X-die?

Thanks in advance

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mkl
April 22, 2008, 12:22 PM
You should cover the entire case with the wax. Then...

Take a Q-tip get the wax on it and wax the inside of the case mouth.

50 Shooter
April 22, 2008, 12:51 PM
Don't go crazy with the wax either, you only need to lightly cover the case. If you use to much you can actually crush the case and ruin it, plus all that extra lube will gum up your die.

As was stated, place a small amount inside the case to ease the expander ball in and out of the case mouth.

loadedround
April 22, 2008, 12:51 PM
Excellent product and does a great job on reforming cases also. As mentioned before use sparingly...a little goes a long way. :)

mewachee
April 22, 2008, 01:59 PM
Any ill effects on powder? I have never lubed the inside of my cases.

coyotehitman
April 22, 2008, 02:09 PM
Imperial is a fine product, but Unique is equal to it and costs less. Do not lube the shoulder of the case and do not apply lube excessively, you will dent the shoulder and ruin the case. I use Unique, but the process is the same. Rub your index finger across the lube, hold the brass between the index and thumb just under the shoulder, spin it once, repeat for the neck, rub a q-tip across the lube, spin it inside the neck, resize, wipe off lube, load.

I am going to experiment with sizing 100 cases, skipping the wipedown, and dropping them into acetone or denatured alcohol to remove lube and any remaining residue in the primer pocket. Acetone dries fast and will remove all the crud and lube.

Anyone see a problem with that? Will the acetone/DNA harm the brass?

LB7_Driver
April 22, 2008, 02:14 PM
Imperial Size Die wax is an excellent case lube, though I use it for low-volume loading and die set-up only. It takes too long to lube a few hundred cases.

For higher-volume loading I recommend any of the available spray lubes.

snuffy
April 22, 2008, 02:55 PM
A lube dented neck does NOT RUIN a case. The dents will fire-form out when you pull the trigger. Same goes for dents in the side of a case caused by the case hitting something after being ejected from a SA rifle.

Everybody is climbing on the imperial bandwagon. It works, but there's better case lube out there. It's also painfully slow to use.

Smokey Joe
April 22, 2008, 03:19 PM
I like what Col. Townsend Whelen had to say abt lubing the inside of the case neck.

He said that what we want in there is "a suspicion of lube." He reccommended putting a little lube on one's index finger, and drawing it gently across the case mouth on every 5th or 6th case to be sized. That keeps just a tiny bit on the carbide neck sizing ball, which is all that's needed.

'Course if you're only neck sizing, and using a Lee Collet Neck-Sizing die, then you don't need any case lube at all. No lube, no cleanup, no mess, yippee!

cracked butt
April 22, 2008, 04:04 PM
Everybody is climbing on the imperial bandwagon. It works, but there's better case lube out there. It's also painfully slow to use.


I disagree about there being better case lubes, I've tried many, and have settled on ISDW. There are lubes that are less messy and faster to apply, but then again no reloading company is losing money by making stuck case removers either.

I just apply it by spinninng a case between my thumb and first 2 fingers, once around the neck, and once over the case mouth- it only takes about a second and a half to lube a case.

strat81
April 22, 2008, 05:16 PM
I get some on my index, middle, and ring fingers and roll/twirl the case as I pick it up. Once it's in the shellholder, I drag my index finger across the mouth. You can do about 2-4 cases before you need to dip your fingers again. Wipes right off your fingers, feels like Chapstick.

Never stuck a case with it.

coyotehitman
April 22, 2008, 07:55 PM
'Course if you're only neck sizing, and using a Lee Collet Neck-Sizing die, then you don't need any case lube at all.

I was under the impression that semi auto rifles required FL sizing. I do not think collet dies crimp the bullet in place well either, do they? I believe my collet dies indicate that you should not use them for hunting ammunition or semi auto rifle rounds.

lgbloader
April 22, 2008, 08:03 PM
+1 for Imperial here. I keep it on the base of my T7. I even use it with carbide dies when I am loading certain handgun califber on my Turret. Dillon spray is good, so is One Shot, but Imperial is the best.

lamazza
April 22, 2008, 08:47 PM
I dab my fingertip and smear it on about 5 cases at a time and roll them in my palm. I never coat inside the case mouth and I don't over do it either.Just a little is needed to lube them up.

TexasSkyhawk
April 22, 2008, 09:22 PM
That goes against everything I've ever heard, read, seen or done in the two decades-plus I've been reloading.

And, I'm with Snuffy. Imperial is good, but there are others that work just as well.

I use Imperial and Lee, but unlike Imperial, I've never had a case stick with Lee. I've had two stick with Imperial, and damn near had a third last week.

Should I be lubing the entire case--neck, shoulder and all--when using Imperial?

Jeff

Smokey Joe
April 22, 2008, 09:48 PM
Coyote hit man--I was under the impression that semi auto rifles required FL sizing. I do not think collet dies crimp the bullet in place well either, do they? I believe my collet dies indicate that you should not use them for hunting ammunition or semi auto rifle rounds.Semis usually do require FL sizing. The collet die is a neck-sizing die, not a bullet seating die, so it has nothing to do with putting a crimp on the case mouth. I use my collet dies for hunting ammo--for my bolt guns--all the time; no ill effects. Never been advised not to. Nor do I crimp any of my rifle ammo, except for M1 Carbine ammo; that gets a taper crimp. (Basically, that's an auto pistol round.)

I mentioned using a collet die (and therefore no case lube) simply because it's so much less hassle.

When I FL size rifle cases of course I use case lube, and tumble the cases when sized to clean them off before proceeding to load the cases.

Sorry if my comment caused confusion.

cracked butt
April 22, 2008, 09:51 PM
Should I be lubing the entire case--neck, shoulder and all--when using Imperial?

With any lube you need to lube everything but the shoulder (keep the lube off the shoulder), its not necessary to do the case mouth but it makes it easier and the expander ball won't stretch the case lengthwise as much when its pulled back out of the mouth. If you are sticking cases with Imperial, you are using it wrong.

scrat
April 22, 2008, 10:23 PM
The absolute best stuff there is. Anybody who knows reloading and has tried it knows about it. Not always in stock at my local gun shop. kinda pricey but well worth it. thats the stuff when they have it you buy two of them.

Clark
April 24, 2008, 09:56 PM
I have used Imperial sizing wax on over 10,000 rounds.
I rub my left hand fore finger in the wax.
I slather the wax from the finger to the brass.
The coating can be extremely thin, but should be complete.

About every 3 to 10 pieces of .223 I need to get some more on my finger.

If there was enough on the last piece of brass, I can skip coating the next one, as there is still wax in the die.

However, too little wax and the press gets hard to operate.
Even less wax and the brass will get stuck in the die.
You will be sorry.

strat81
April 24, 2008, 10:18 PM
kinda pricey but well worth it. thats the stuff when they have it you buy two of them.
1) $6 is pricey?
2) Two of them?? I have over 1K rounds on my first tin and I've barely scratched the surface, so to speak. Maybe it's my itty-bitty .223 cases. I guess if I man-up to some .300 Win Mag cases, it might go a little faster. But I'd probably burn out the barrel on the rifle first!

ArchAngelCD
April 24, 2008, 11:58 PM
As for cleanup with Imperial, all you need to do is wash them off with water. Then I put them on a cookie sheet in the over at 150 for about 10 min. That's all it takes...

jenrob
April 25, 2008, 03:12 AM
it only takes about a second and a half to lube a case.

I can spary a hundred rounds about that fast.

For AR brass I would use a spray for my larger cals. I use ISW.

If I get a bunch of mixed once fired then I use the ISW for AR brass as I sort and inspect I roll it on and throw it in a can. Ready to go then

Clark
April 25, 2008, 04:05 PM
I use Imperial wax as a release agent for glass bedding barreled actions to stocks and scope mounts to receivers.

[I already have in on my finger.]

Roccobro
April 26, 2008, 12:18 AM
As for cleanup with Imperial, all you need to do is wash them off with water. Then I put them on a cookie sheet in the over at 150 for about 10 min. That's all it takes..

I take it you use a single stage, resize, then wash and dry before loading? I just can't picture me processing .223 by the thousand on my progressive and doing all that jazz. :D

Justin

ArchAngelCD
April 26, 2008, 12:31 AM
I take it you use a single stage, resize, then wash and dry before loading? I just can't picture me processing .223 by the thousand on my progressive and doing all that jazz. :D

Justin
I have a Lee 4 Hole Turret Press which I use as a single stage press when reloading rifle rounds.

I agree, I wouldn't go through all that jazz if I were reloading .223 rounds either. Since I usually make only between 60 and 100 30-06 rounds at a time, it's not a issue.

lordgroom
April 26, 2008, 11:52 PM
Used Imperial Sizing wax like this post said... Ran my index finger across the wax once and coated all of the brass except the shoulder. Re-applied to my finger every time for a few times and then every 2-3 shells. I was FL re-sizing .223. I had a stuck case after about 25 shells. I switched to Dillon spray in a plastic baggy with about 20 shells and had no problems. Perhaps the error was my own but the dillon was far easier. I removed the lubricant by tumbling again while trimming other shells.

Uncle Chan
May 21, 2008, 09:15 PM
I found that the hornady spray lube works great, if you follow the directions. I didn't my last batch and ended up denting the shoulders. The key is to follow the instructions. I didn't. I paid for it. I learned.

Uncle Chan

mkl
May 21, 2008, 10:10 PM
I must be the one in a thousand that has not had a good experience with Imperial sizing wax.

I have a small press (the RCBS Jr. for those of you who can remember it) that does not have the power of the modern presses. This means I can really feel the pressure it takes to full length resize the larger rifle cases. My two-cents worth is this:

The absolute best lube for high pressure forming is Rooster CFL-56 case forming lubricant. Goes on the same way as Imperial, but works 1000% better.

If you are sizing small (223 Rem. or so) cases, almost any good spray lube will do and is much quicker. Use the bag method. I use Hornady One-Shot.

While Imperial Sizing Wax will not dissolve in water, it will dissolve in naptha (common lighter fluid for your Zippo cigarrete lighter, or available in Home Depot paint department).

I use my "liquid Imperial" on a small round brush to lubercate the inside of the case mouths -- works better than anything I have found.

Take about a quarter teaspoon of Imperial sizing wax and mix with one ounce of naptha in a small glass bottle. You can use a regular hair drier to heat the mixture up to 130 degrees F or so to make the dissolving go faster. After use be sure to cap the bottle with a tight fitting cap so the naptha won't evaproate.

Dip a nylon bore brush that fits the case neck gently into the Imperial/naptha solution, and make one pass inside the case neck (a Q-Tip will also work). Let dry for ten minutes or so and you will have a perfectly lubed case neck with minimum friction when withdrawing the expander button.

Best neck lube I've ever found, but Imperial has just not worked for me on the outside of the cases when full length resizing large cases on my "under-leveraged" press. Anyone out there using the Lee Hand Press on larger bottle neck cartridges, the Rooster CFL-56 will amaze you.

And no, I have no connection with the Rooster company. Just have tried almost all lubes from STP on...

Bear2000
May 21, 2008, 10:38 PM
I use Imperial Wax exclusively for .223, .308, and even 9mm with my Lee Classic Turret Press. I've reloaded a couple of thousand rounds and have hardly dented my $5 tin. Just a little bit on the thumb and index finger lasts for 4-5 cases. I just rub a little on the neck/sides (not even all sides) as I slip it onto the shell holder, that's it. Love this stuff.

rbernie
May 21, 2008, 11:44 PM
I have had no issues with a number of commercial spray-on lubes. For quantity sizing of rifle ammo, there is no better system than spraying hundreds or thousands of cases at a time in a bucket and shakin' it around to spread the lube evenly.

Matt Dillon
May 24, 2008, 12:38 PM
I dip the mouths of rifle cases into some motor Mica, then run the mouth through a little brush, to lube the case mouths. I then use Imperial wax not on the case neck, but the body of the case. I add some to my fingers ~ every 5-10 cases, as if I feel the press getting a little hard to operate, I will rub some of the imperial die wax on my finger for the next batch of 5-10 cases. I use this technique for all rifle cases.

jerkface11
May 24, 2008, 01:15 PM
You have to full length size for a semi auto. Otherwise you'll end up with stuck cases.

TexasSkyhawk
May 25, 2008, 10:14 AM
I must be the one in a thousand that has not had a good experience with Imperial sizing wax.

Well, you have company then.

I went over twenty years with zero problems while using primarily Lee lube, and RCBS lube.

Couple of months ago, I get persuaded to try Imperial.

Three stuck cases and one ruined sizing die within a month. RCBS even wrote me back and informed me that 95% of the stuck cases in dies they get are the result of wax lubricants. They wrote this as they were replacing my decapping/sizing die that had a case permanently stuck in it. I'd even called up Redding and made sure I was applying it correctly.

In the trash it went.

Guess there are two in a thousand of us now.

Jeff

K3
May 25, 2008, 02:27 PM
1) $6 is pricey?
2) Two of them?? I have over 1K rounds on my first tin and I've barely scratched the surface, so to speak. Maybe it's my itty-bitty .223 cases. I guess if I man-up to some .300 Win Mag cases, it might go a little faster. But I'd probably burn out the barrel on the rifle first!

.375 H&H won't even make a dent in a can of Imperial....

charadam
May 31, 2008, 05:04 PM
I use Imperial for all resizing and case forming.

Struggled for years with all sorts and kinds of desperate lubes when trying to form 577/450 Martini Henry brass out of annealed CBC 24 gauge cases. It's a pretty radical reforming operation, necking the 24 gauge down to .577 and producing pretty small radii at the shoulder.

Since adopting Imperial about 2 years ago, I have a 99.9% success rate - and any that fail can be turned into .577 Snider just by trimming the length and again going the Imperial route.

Anyone want to buy several gallons of assorted lubricants?

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