Can you shoot a fish caught with rod and reel?


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Jiggle
April 25, 2008, 03:03 AM
I recently acquired a small boat that I have been using to do some fishing in the intracoastal. I was wondering if I catch a fish that is simply too big or violent to bring into the boat alive (eg: a shark), can I shoot it to kill it? As long as I am sure that the fish is legal to keep and I am fully confident that there is no way my actions could injure another party, would I be justified in using a firearm to prevent any harm to myself or my vessel?

There is a story in this month's Florida Sportsman about a man who fought a 600 pound mako for 3 hours on light tackle before he called in two more boats to help out. They shot it with a 12 gauge shotgun and a .40 caliber handgun. Just got me thinking.

There are laws in Florida that criminalize the "taking" of fish with a firearm. But what if the fish is taken with rod and reel, and the firearm is only used to finish the fight? I suppose it would be legal as long as I'm not breaking any other laws concerning discharging the firearm?

TIA

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Cosmoline
April 25, 2008, 03:09 AM
You'd have to ask your state F&G department. Up here it's pretty routine to kill large halibut and salmon shark with a snake charmer .410. If brought onboard alive they're powerful enough to knock people right off the side.

It's not generally legal to go fishing with a firearm as your tool for a number of reasons.

Regolith
April 25, 2008, 03:09 AM
Check your local fishing regulations. But besides that, you also have to realize that a bullet can "skip" across water, just like a stone, if the angle is right, so shooting at something that's in the water isn't always the safest thing to do.

theken206
April 25, 2008, 03:15 AM
^yup, water can deflect rounds and make em skip

Dksimon
April 25, 2008, 03:23 AM
get yourself a basebal bat and forget the gun. IMO you would/could get into alot of trouble with a firearm.

Also, what if you get stopped by G&F and they ask to see you take?
How are you going to prove that you hooked it and then shot it?

johnnyonthespot
April 25, 2008, 05:03 AM
a buddy i grew up with was fishing in alaska with friends when somebody hooked a big BIG flounder...

after a huge fight the line almost broke and BANG!

my buddy rick was standing there with a smoking .45 and there was one HUGE limp flounder to flop in the boat...

rick is notorious for doing things that go down in legend...

Buzztail
April 25, 2008, 06:46 AM
Dealing with large fish is part of offshore fishing- a part that needs to be learned. If you don't have someone that can teach/help you, your better off fighting it to the boat and cutting it off.
Getting hurt offshore is not something to take lightly!

SDC
April 25, 2008, 07:23 AM
But besides that, you also have to realize that a bullet can "skip" across water, just like a stone, if the angle is right, so shooting at something that's in the water isn't always the safest thing to do.

To reiterate, this HAS happened in the past; a woman in Florida was killed under just these circumstances, by a bullet that had skipped inshore from a shark-fishing boat. They would hook the sharks and bring them to the boat and then shoot them to hoist them onboard, and this woman was driving on a highway parallel to the beach several miles from the boat, but one shot skipped shorebound and managed to hit this woman in the head, killing her. Not a one in a million shot, but a one in a BILLION shot.

HOME DEPOT GEORGE
April 25, 2008, 07:36 AM
If you choose to use a gun to subdue a fish the best advice I can give you is to use a bang stick this way you have no chance of missing your target and hitting something you will regret. They use them for gators if I'm correct and I know people who use them for grouper while diving.

Travis Lee
April 25, 2008, 08:06 AM
You CAN use a gun on a fish, but ONLY if he pulls a knife on you first.

:D

--Travis--

30 cal slob
April 25, 2008, 08:11 AM
there's a lot of debate about this.

there are/were some jurisdictions (such as vermont) where you can actually shoot fish in the water (muskie hunting with a 12 ga - you don't shoot the fish, you blow the swim bladder by shooting near the fish).

saltwater pelagics along the left and east costs require some extra care. the whippy tail of a large thresher shark, for example, can kill you if you're not careful.

if you're going to keep a large shark or tuna for the table - you're going to have to bleed it to prevent the meat from going bad. this is because these fish lack kidneys and as soon as the animal dies, there is going to be ammonia build-up in the meat (which is horrible from a dining perspective).

i think you'll accomplish bleeding better by NOT shooting the fish. tail-rope it, and slice the gills. the beating heart of a live fish will exsanguinate it, whereas a dead fish won't bleed as readily.

having said that, it is common for boaters to use 12 gauge (00 buck) bang sticks or shotguns to dispatch large quarry such as barndoor halibut (in the several hundred pound class).

but extra care is required on a slippery boat deck and rolling seas!

XDKingslayer
April 25, 2008, 09:30 AM
From the Florida fishing regulations:

The use of powerheads, explosives, chemicals, or the discharge of firearms into the water to kill or harvest marine life is prohibited in state waters.

That includes bangsticks by the way.

Why do you need to shoot a fish you caught with rod and reel? My buddy just set the IGFA world record on hammerhead and he didn't see the need to shoot the thing...If he can bring in a 1000+ lb hammerhead on a rod and reel NOBODY needs to shoot fish.

HOME DEPOT GEORGE
April 25, 2008, 12:10 PM
State waters only extend 3 miles and to be honest I would be more afraid of a 60 pound green cobia (dont ask) than a 1000# shark.

svtruth
April 25, 2008, 12:18 PM
Vermont has (or had) a firearms season for pike.
In the spring the gravid females swim into shallow water to spawn, accompanied by multiple males.
They are shot from trees and stands and the concussion kills them.

XDKingslayer
April 25, 2008, 12:31 PM
Cobias go in my belly.

K3
April 25, 2008, 12:38 PM
My grandfather and uncle talked of guys in NW Wisconsin using a bat to knock a big muskie upside the head once they got it into the boat. They said a few guys would use a .22.

Since the biggest muskie I ever caught was under 30", it wasn't really an issue. :o

K3
April 25, 2008, 12:40 PM
This is interesting:

http://toothycritters.com/malo.html

Malo's fish was shot twice at boatside, prior to bringing it into the boat.

the fact that it was shot (common practice then) prior to landing it.

Bobarino
April 25, 2008, 12:50 PM
on the other coast, (in WA anyway) the only fish legal to shoot while fighting/landing the fish is Halibut. they can weigh hundreds of pounds and cause serious injury to people and damage to boats if they are brought into the gunwale while still alive and kickin.

Bobby

ghostsix
April 25, 2008, 12:54 PM
Sure you can. If it has big teeth, you had better.

Art Eatman
April 25, 2008, 01:06 PM
The law probably varies by state. Caught on a line, shooting the fish is not "taking" by shooting, at least not in the regulatory sense.

Whether or not to shoot instead of using a fish-billy and the safety aspect as to ricochets are different issues from the legal.

Art

ArmedBear
April 25, 2008, 01:34 PM
California law allows for unlicensed concealed carry by licensed fishermen while engaged in fishing, or going to or coming from said fishing.

So, presumably, there's some legal situation where you would shoot fish.:)

Bob R
April 25, 2008, 01:59 PM
IIRC, what would have been a sport fishing world record Alaskan Halibut was disallowed because it was shot with a 410 prior to landing.

They figured there was now way to get it in the boat while alive.

The biggest Alaskan Halibult landed, that I can recall, was a little over 500 pounds. It was caught by a longliner.

bob

ArmedBear
April 25, 2008, 02:02 PM
Geez!

What would you do with all the meat?

Cosmoline
April 25, 2008, 02:15 PM
IIRC, what would have been a sport fishing world record Alaskan Halibut was disallowed because it was shot with a 410 prior to landing.

Just to reiterate, that has NOTHING to do with Alaska F&G laws. It's not illegal to cap off a halibut, I've personally seen it done many times. But there are separate rules established by the self-appointed jerks who decide the "world records." They're a bunch of upper crust dingles who don't like guns. I'd like to see one jump in the frigid water and deal with a 500 lb. salmon shark or barn door halibut bare handed. They put absurd ideals of "sportsmanship" over safety and humane slaughter. If you get knocked off in those waters even with the boat right there you stand a good chance of freezing to death or dying of sudden cardiac arrest. Lower 48 jerks have no idea how cold it is in there. None whatsoever.

Very large halibut can be shot in the brain with a .22 caliber pistol or small shotgun, but make sure you have control of the fish before doing this. The brain is located just behind (toward the tail) the upper eye.

http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/statewide/halibut.cfm

XDKingslayer
April 25, 2008, 03:15 PM
They're a bunch of upper crust dingles who don't like guns.

Even the one I gave directions to a local gun show?

ArmedBear
April 25, 2008, 03:24 PM
They're a bunch of upper crust dingles who don't like guns. I'd like to see one jump in the frigid water and deal with a 500 lb. salmon shark or barn door halibut bare handed. They put absurd ideals of "sportsmanship" over safety and humane slaughter.

Uh, I think you're a bit off-base.

Sport fishing records have nothing to do with anything but sport fishing records. You can still eat the fish. You can still have the picture of you and the fish hung up at the local bar without being mocked as a fake. The fish might still be of interest to news reporters, marine biologists, sportfishing-related businesses.

You just can't have a record, recorded with a particular organization, for landing a 500 lb. fish in your boat, when you didn't do that.

Think about this. What if you're the guy who actually landed a live 485 lb. halibut in your boat? Would you want your record to be broken by a guy who shot his fish in the water?

I agree with you about safety, ethics, humane slaughter, etc. But since when have world records been about safety, ethics, etc?:)

DoubleTapDrew
April 25, 2008, 03:28 PM
I caught a 104lb halibut in Alaska when I was about 19. The skipper popped it in the head with a .410 before we pulled it in the boat. Some of those fish are a couple hundred pounds of thrashing lean muscle and WILL break your legs, kill you, knock you off the boat, or kick a hole in the boat if you try to bring them onboard alive. The last time I went up we got little 30 pounders and just gaffed them and threw them in the fish box.
You don't want to go in the water there, just sticking your arm in the water is painful and you won't be swimming for more than about 5 seconds before you can't move.

ArmedBear
April 25, 2008, 03:30 PM
DTD, quit whining and go read The Old Man and the Sea by this guy.

http://www.lafeeabsinthe.com/assets/history/hemingway.jpg

RoadkingLarry
April 25, 2008, 03:35 PM
NOBODY needs to shoot fish.


Nobody NEEDS to go offshore fishing for shark either

:neener:

MarcusWendt
April 25, 2008, 03:36 PM
California law allows for unlicensed concealed carry by licensed fishermen while engaged in fishing, or going to or coming from said fishing.

So, presumably, there's some legal situation where you would shoot fish.

Can you cite the code that allows that?

ArmedBear
April 25, 2008, 03:39 PM
12027.3g

http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/dwcl/12020.php

(BTW when going to or coming from expedition, gun must be unloaded.)

RP88
April 25, 2008, 03:44 PM
I wouldnt consider it as the smart thing to do. That is a good way to put a whole in your boat or possibly lose a gun.

When I go fishing for monster cats or cobia, or catch a shark, your everyday rubber mallot or hammer will do the trick for killing them. (or in the Cobia's case, dazing it so that it doesnt trash the deck of your boat or break your leg with one good snap of the tail)

ArmedBear
April 25, 2008, 03:46 PM
People who take fatal risks with lousy odds, in the pursuit of a token world record, deserve whatever they get. If they live, they should get their record and be quickly forgotten. If they die, they should simply be quickly forgotten.

Buzztail
April 25, 2008, 03:56 PM
I have buried my Aftco gaffs in some real big, and real green cobia. They come onbaord and get to beat the snot out of one of the infloor fishboxes. Followed by heaps of ice ASAP.
Sharks are cut and dragged (since someone else has posted this already, I won't be giving newbies any ideas) The only way I'll eat shark meat.
Kingfish and wahoo get the same treatment as the Ling- Ice, steel, grill, butter, etc... Yummy!

XDKingslayer
April 25, 2008, 03:59 PM
I'm going to have cobia for dinner. You all made me hungry...

RyanM
April 25, 2008, 04:15 PM
California law allows for unlicensed concealed carry by licensed fishermen while engaged in fishing, or going to or coming from said fishing.

So, presumably, there's some legal situation where you would shoot fish.

Are you sure that's not to prevent piracy?

DonP
April 25, 2008, 05:05 PM
I'm old enough to recall how a small .22 revolver was pretty standard equipment in most serious Musky Hunter's tackle boxes.

One of my neighbors hailed from Kenora Ontario and always had a little starter pistol sized .22 wrapped in an oilcloth (that dates me right there) along with a box of ammo in the bottom of his tackle box.

Only saw him use it once on a really good sized pike before bringing it in the boat. I have to give him credit, Fred knew how to fillet a Pike and get all the Y-bones out. Great eating, not up to walleye Shore Lunch standards, but pretty darned good in a Beer Batter.

Now they all switched to the weighted billy club if they are keeping the fish.

Darn, it's Friday night and now I'm hungry for fish! Better check witht he wife and see if she feels like a trip to the VFW for some fish and pitcher of beer.

DoubleTapDrew
April 25, 2008, 05:33 PM
DTD, quit whining and go read The Old Man and the Sea by this guy.
I haven't read that in a long time! The old man should have had a gun for the sharks, but I suppose if you fight a fish for a couple days he wouldn't be as much of a risk being all tuckered out. :)

cassandrasdaddy
April 25, 2008, 06:11 PM
know a guy who put a small hole in his boat

Cosmoline
April 25, 2008, 06:15 PM
Think about this. What if you're the guy who actually landed a live 485 lb. halibut in your boat? Would you want your record to be broken by a guy who shot his fish in the water?

You don't shoot it when it's swimming by. You raise it up to the surface and shot its brain out, then hoist it up. To do otherwise is to put everyone's safety at risk esp on the deck of a crowded boat in a giant washing machine full of lethal cold water. I don't think the jerks who make these rules have a clue about the conditions people fish in up here, even on "good" weather days. I think they're a bunch of upper crust jerks with their own pleasure craft used to having a team of underlings lift their marlin or whatever on board. But I digress ;-) I'm really just burning with petty envy.

ArmedBear
April 25, 2008, 06:24 PM
The record for an Alaskan Halibut is not the same as the record for a Marlin.

Again, I agree with you about not committing suicide in pursuit of a world record. However, those who pursue world records may not agree. Let 'em do whatever...:) They have issues, and they have to live with themselves like any of us.

Why are records so important anyway? And why do you make yourself sound like you envy these people?

Markbo
April 25, 2008, 07:01 PM
In the immortal words of Kevin Cronin: "You can tune a piano, but you can't tuna fish"

sacp81170a
April 25, 2008, 07:06 PM
You CAN use a gun on a fish, but ONLY if he pulls a knife on you first.

So that means a swordfish can be shot if he's within 21 feet? ;)

Kind of Blued
April 26, 2008, 01:23 AM
Apparently you can off-shore in Alaska. The guide didn't tell me about this practice until I had caught a 180 lb. halibut and they had hooked it through the side and pulled it up to the rail of the boat.

I'm admiring my catch and a huge bang goes off 3 feet left and 2 feet back from me. The guide is standing there with a Glock 22 and looks at me. Then I hear the brass plop in the water over to my right. Then I look back at him...

"That thing'd break yer legs."

"Oh. Ok. Thanks....
.
.
.
.
.
Glock 22?"

"Yep."

:uhoh::eek::what::o

But ultimately, :D.

RP88
April 26, 2008, 01:35 AM
I can see alot of reason for shooting a halibut or monster fish like tuna, but anything else with a head not much bigger than yours is the perfect size for a hammer, mallot, crowbar, or club.

In all honesty, the only time I'd have a gun on me when fishing is if I was in Florida or some place down far south, and it would be a 12-gauge or my cousin's .357 to take out snagged alligator gar, gators and pythons.:uhoh:

Jiggle
April 26, 2008, 03:13 AM
Why do you need to shoot a fish you caught with rod and reel? My buddy just set the IGFA world record on hammerhead and he didn't see the need to shoot the thing...If he can bring in a 1000+ lb hammerhead on a rod and reel NOBODY needs to shoot fish.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The difference is that I'm not fishing in a 30' center console boat with a tuna tower. I'm in a 14' aluminum v-hull with a 10 hp motor. I don't intend on going out to catch a record fish, but if I happen to accidentally hook up with a big shark that I intend on keeping, it would be safer for all of the occupants of my boat if the fish were dead before being brought onboard or even close to the boat.

As far as a richochet, I wouldn't be shooting at the fish when it was 30 feet away from the boat. I would surely wait for the fish to be close enough that the bullet would either enter the fish or fragment on impact with the water. I know that a richochet off of water is possible and I have seen it happen before. I just wouldn't allow enough of an angle with the water that a richochet would be likely.

I appreciate the honest answers, as I was half expecting to be flamed for asking this question. Please know that I have no intention of shooting every fish that I catch, I just want to know if I am likely to end up in trouble for killing a fish in this manner if the need arises.

One of my neighbors hailed from Kenora Ontario and always had a little starter pistol sized .22 wrapped in an oilcloth (that dates me right there) along with a box of ammo in the bottom of his tackle box.
My grandparents have a cabin in Sioux Narrows and I have been to Kenora several times. Lake of the Woods is a beautiful place. I hope to take my children there some day. Also, if the S ever HTF, that's where I'll be headed.

sauger
April 26, 2008, 03:45 AM
Can you shoot a fish caught with rod and reel?
I recently acquired a small boat that I have been using to do some fishing in the intracoastal. I was wondering if I catch a fish that is simply too big or violent to bring into the boat alive (eg: a shark), can I shoot it to kill it? As long as I am sure that the fish is legal to keep and I am fully confident that there is no way my actions could injure another party, would I be justified in using a firearm to prevent any harm to myself or my vessel?

There is a story in this month's Florida Sportsman about a man who fought a 600 pound mako for 3 hours on light tackle before he called in two more boats to help out. They shot it with a 12 gauge shotgun and a .40 caliber handgun. Just got me thinking.

There are laws in Florida that criminalize the "taking" of fish with a firearm. But what if the fish is taken with rod and reel, and the firearm is only used to finish the fight? I suppose it would be legal as long as I'm not breaking any other laws concerning discharging the firearm?

Only if the fish was reaching for a side arm!

Buzztail
April 26, 2008, 07:20 AM
The difference is that I'm not fishing in a 30' center console boat with a tuna tower. I'm in a 14' aluminum v-hull with a 10 hp motor.

Please DO NOT try to boat a big fish in a 14' boat.

I must admit that I have been about seven miles offshore in my Alumacraft 1648 with a 30hp- grouper fishing on a nearshore artificial reef. The look of shock when the guys in the 19' center consoles was priceless. :what:
One of them actually broke the water for me when we headed in- I had limit of gags and black seabass. ;) even released a small kingfish
People often asked me why I carried 200' of 1/2 rode on a johnboat:D

MechAg94
April 26, 2008, 08:41 AM
I know some guys who do a lot of bowfishing in rivers and lakes here in Texas. They don't use guns, but they do have a club. Alligator gar have a lot of teeth so they have to bring them in close and knock them over the forehead to kill them. I have gone with them and we were trolling along the shore in the middle of the night with campers not too far away. Gun fire would not have been good.

Texas allows bowfishing of non-game fish so you can go for carp, gar, tilapia and such.

http://www.bowfishtexas.com/

DoubleTapDrew
April 26, 2008, 04:41 PM
Think about this. What if you're the guy who actually landed a live 485 lb. halibut in your boat? Would you want your record to be broken by a guy who shot his fish in the water?
I wouldn't mind (but if it's against the rules, it's against the rules). Fighting the fish is the hard part (usually for a couple hours) and often once it sees the boat it'll take off again like it's running from the police, several times. Actually pulling it on the boat when the fight is over isn't even done by the fisherman on any charter I've been on, and usually those big ones won't fit in the fish box so it's a safety issue. Well-heeled guys probably charter a boat solo but anytime I've gone there are at least 6 guys fishing off the deck, not a good place for a flopping ankle-breaker!
As for riccochets, anytime I've seen one shot, it's basically a shot straight down when it's alongside the boat, it's not like you are trying to drill it 30 feet out.

tblt
April 26, 2008, 04:57 PM
When I hunted south GA. we would go out at night fishing I used my 44 mag it worked real good,shoot next to the fish and he will be dead or stuned long enough to pull it out of the water.If you hit it,it will be no good.I would go 22 if I wanted to hit the fish.

Cosmoline
April 26, 2008, 04:58 PM
Well-heeled guys probably charter a boat solo but anytime I've gone there are at least 6 guys fishing off the deck, not a good place for a flopping ankle-breaker!

That's the key to it. When I get to go fishing in salt water it's only by throwing in with five or six other people to go out on some meat boat with limited space, a pitching deck and a lot of slime and blood all around. There's no crew of guys rooting you on and grabbing the fish with multiple gaffs. Also if you go overboard it's not a matter of getting wet and having a laugh. The water itself is quite lethal, and there's a good chance you'll die before you can get brought back on board.

Besides, I have a hard time remembering the last time I went fishing WITHOUT a firearm. It was probably down in Oregon in the last century. A firearm is standard equipment here, salt or fresh water.

blackcash88
April 26, 2008, 06:44 PM
DTD, quit whining and go read The Old Man and the Sea by this guy.

Ironic how ol' Ernest bagged and tagged himself in the very way we're talking about dispatching fish.

What about using a spear gun? Or a pike through the brain? No firearms involved...

hankdatank1362
April 28, 2008, 12:05 PM
For us in warmer climes, a tuna bat has always done the trick for anyting I've ever caught. But I've never done better than mid-sized tuna or marlin.

Well, one big tarpon, but I never considered him a threat.

We all still had guns anyway.

XDKingslayer
April 28, 2008, 12:45 PM
You don't shoot it when it's swimming by. You raise it up to the surface and shot its brain out, then hoist it up. To do otherwise is to put everyone's safety at risk esp on the deck of a crowded boat in a giant washing machine full of lethal cold water. I don't think the jerks who make these rules have a clue about the conditions people fish in up here, even on "good" weather days. I think they're a bunch of upper crust jerks with their own pleasure craft used to having a team of underlings lift their marlin or whatever on board. But I digress ;-) I'm really just burning with petty envy.

I'm thinking that before you complain about not being able to shoot the fish you should probably learn more about the record qualifying process.

Record fish DO NOT have to be boated. The 1280 lb. record hammerhead my buddy caught was never brought on board his 24 foot bay boat. It was brought to the boat with rod and reel, subdued with 2 flying gaffs, secured to the side of the boat with a tail rope, then transported to the dock and loaded onto his boat trailer and taken to the weigh station.

The shark never saw the inside of his boat...

lance22
April 28, 2008, 12:54 PM
I used to live in South Florida - spent plenty of time out on the water. The law is paranoid towards firearms, but not gaff, bat, et cetera.

I used to freedive spearfish and the stringer of speared fish would be attached to a float which is part of our gear. Since we and the catch are both in the water away from a boat there are sharks and cuda which are attracted to thrashing. At the same time, we don't want more blood in the water than necessary because this is also bad for spearfishing.

Short of it - the stringer would go through the eye sockets and this ends the fight in most fish. If they persist, the point of the stringer is used again through the eye socket in search of the brain. NOT up the chest cavity as that produces massive bleeding.

Your needs of taking a fish into the boat may be very different - if you are within sight of shore you will get yourself into a load of crap if you discharge a firearm as the fish and game watch you with binoculars - they always think you are stealing reds or snook - and a firearm will certainly gain their attention.

HankDaTank's suggestion of the tuna bat might be what the doctor ordered.

Cosmoline
April 28, 2008, 01:01 PM
I'm happy he was in a circumstance where that was possible. It is not always. Imagine a trillion gallon washing machine set on extra soiled and that's PWS on a windy day. As far as I can see, the official record requirements favor rich folks who go out with the intention and equipment to catch huge fish. The ordinary fisherman who happens to catch a barn door but isn't set up to hang the beast on the side of his small craft is SOL, since he has to shoot the animal to bring it in.

Markbo
April 28, 2008, 01:11 PM
I am more a hunter than fisherman, but I have fished the bays, surf, offshore, way offshore and in other countries.

I have free-dived and scuba-dived with sharks and other toothy critters. I have caught, boated and just drug ashore big toothy fish of all kinds. In none of these cases did I ever feel the need for a firearm to fish. :rolleyes:

XDKingslayer
April 28, 2008, 04:00 PM
I'm happy he was in a circumstance where that was possible. It is not always. Imagine a trillion gallon washing machine set on extra soiled and that's PWS on a windy day. As far as I can see, the official record requirements favor rich folks who go out with the intention and equipment to catch huge fish. The ordinary fisherman who happens to catch a barn door but isn't set up to hang the beast on the side of his small craft is SOL, since he has to shoot the animal to bring it in.

Again, let me refer to my buddy who caught his record hammerhead on a 24 foot bay boat designed to run in 12" or less of water. Was drug 12 miles out to sea by this shark and was still able to subdue it with just him and another person.

He's nobody special. He's not rich. He doesn't have a special boat. He doesn't have a crew of people to grab his fish and give him a manicure while the fish aren't biting.

How do the requirements favor the rich? If you actually read the rest of the rules past "you can't shoot them" you'll see that it's a very fair system and is in no way custom tailored to rich people.

The fact remains that if you want to land a record you need tackle capable of doing so. If you do, then you don't need to shoot them. If you can't land that record fish, oh well. I've released record fish at boatside simply because I didn't have the means that day to get them into a weigh station.

And I'm by no means rich or special.

Check out the rules if you're interested: http://www.igfa.org/BookRule2004.pdf

Wolfeye
April 28, 2008, 04:11 PM
This went down as one of those "I can't believe anyone is that stupid" urban legends, but: a guy back in my hometown in Alaska once shot a halibut while it was in his boat. He supposedly used a .44 magnum, and he ended up with a neat .429" leak in the bottom of his skiff.

:uhoh:

Tyris
April 28, 2008, 04:31 PM
This thread has me itching to shoot a salmon or large mouth bass. :D

-T

MechAg94
April 28, 2008, 06:10 PM
In Texas, shooting game fish is not allowed. At least that is the case for people who bowfish. Game fish include bass, catfish, and others. Don't know if they have the same rule in Oregon.

Not sure how that applies off shore.

wally
April 28, 2008, 06:33 PM
The biggest Alaskan Halibult landed, that I can recall, was a little over 500 pounds. It was caught by a longliner.
Geez!

What would you do with all the meat?

At $20+/lb for Halibut around here, it'd be quite a windfall! Sell it and buy more guns :)

--wally.

Cosmoline
April 28, 2008, 06:34 PM
If you actually read the rest of the rules past "you can't shoot them" you'll see that it's a very fair system and is in no way custom tailored to rich people.

It essentially excludes anyone from the record books who wasn't planning on getting there. The fisherman who hooks a giant but must shoot it in order to bring it in is excluded. They have a book for the elite trophy hunters, and they don't want some unwashed Alaskan grabbing the record with his S-Mart tackle and a snake charmer.

Don Gwinn
April 28, 2008, 06:38 PM
There isn't much in life that isn't easier to do if you're rich. That's just the way it is.

Anyway, the legal question has been answered. I think you might have to agree to disagree on the fishing records.

jhco
April 28, 2008, 06:43 PM
i would think that you would have to hit a vital organ since the fish cant realy bleed to death so it might be hard to kill unless you are carefull to place the shot well

QuakKillz
April 28, 2008, 07:18 PM
don't know if it has been posted.....but.....get a gaff.....

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