Sorta neck sizing


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jacobhh
April 27, 2008, 12:41 PM
Rather than buying neck sizing dies, I've been coating a case
with silicon powder and setting the die to just touch the shoulder.
What are the diadvantages of doing it this way?

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rcmodel
April 27, 2008, 01:06 PM
What the heck is silicon powder?

rcmodel

jacobhh
April 27, 2008, 01:19 PM
My mistake RC. It's mica not silicone. White dry lube.

USSR
April 27, 2008, 03:49 PM
No problem with partial FL sizing, as long as you aren't loading for an autoloader. However, eventually, you will need to bump the shoulder back, just like neck sizers have to.

Don

jacobhh
April 27, 2008, 05:43 PM
Thanks Don.

In order to produce an optimal cartridge for my bolt guns should I buy
a neck sizing die?

USSR
April 27, 2008, 06:19 PM
Hey, if what you're doing is working, why buy another die? Spend the money on components and do more shooting.

Don

jacobhh
April 27, 2008, 06:37 PM
Good point. There're other areas I can work on, like keeping the crosshairs
on target. shooting more would get ME more consistent.

mrawesome22-250
April 27, 2008, 11:07 PM
I will add that you are still FL sizing. You just aren't bumping the shoulder. You are still contracting the body of the case. This produces a sloppy chamber fit and decreased brass life.

A neck die will not touch the body of the case so it will be a perfect fit for your chamber and case life will be improved as well. Accuracy will also improve with a neck die. I recommend a Lee Collet die if you are worried about cost. They are a wonderful tool and cheap to boot. And they work the neck only once instead of twice. A bushing die will only work the neck once also but they are much more expensive.

EDIT: Another thing about the bushing die. If you are going to use a bushing die you need to turns the case necks in order to get consistent neck tension. The tools to turn necks is another cost of using a bushing die.

USSR
April 28, 2008, 07:26 AM
Another thing about the bushing die. If you are going to use a bushing die you need to turns the case necks in order to get consistent neck tension. The tools to turn necks is another cost of using a bushing die.

Not true. This is another Internet myth that I have thoroughly debunked. I have been shooting in 1000 yard F Class competition for 6 years now, and my loads developed using bushing dies WITHOUT neck turning my brass, keep up with all the other guys loads developed in other manners. If I was getting inconsistent neck tension, it surely would show up at 1000 yards.

Don

Walkalong
April 28, 2008, 07:53 AM
Neck turning/reaming is unecessary unless you have tight necked chambers or sometimes when sizing one caliber down to another. :)

mrawesome22-250
April 28, 2008, 07:19 PM
I have to turn my necks with a bushing die. But I am using Win and Rem brass. When I first got my bushing die I didn't turn necks and I could actually feel the inconsistent tension while seating. So I decided to try neck turning and it greatly improved the consistency of the feel I was getting while seating. I'm probably not a good enough shooter to measure it on paper, but it sure gave me peace of mind feeling the same exact resistance every time while seating, if nothing else.

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