Found a Colt in my Dad's basement


PDA






FourTeeFive
April 27, 2008, 03:39 PM
I had no idea they made these:

http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w4/fourteefive/ColtBox.jpg

If you enjoyed reading about "Found a Colt in my Dad's basement" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
rocinante
April 27, 2008, 03:50 PM
Kewl. At first glance I said nah. You can have the same name as long as it is not in the same industry but sure nuf Colt's Pat. Firearms Mfg Co., Hartford, Conn.

I AM ENCOURAGED! Maybe my future plasma rifle in the 40 watt range might be Colt.

FourTeeFive
April 27, 2008, 04:11 PM
sure nuf Colt's Pat. Firearms Mfg Co., Hartford, Conn.

That's what surprised me. I could understand having another division of the company (Colt Electrical) but to have "Firearms Mfg" on a building product seems a bit strange. On the other hand I used to have a Remington 1911, so to these manufacturers I guess metal is metal.

Sage of Seattle
April 27, 2008, 04:19 PM
So, FourTeeFive, were you shocked?

average_shooter
April 27, 2008, 05:41 PM
Neat.

My dream gun that I'll never actually get is one of those Singer Sewing Machine Co. 1911s. I think it would be the perfect companion piece to the Singer sewing machine I've already got. :p

Superlite27
April 27, 2008, 06:27 PM
Hmmmm. Only 30 amp?

You'd think it would be 45.

Pilot
April 27, 2008, 06:31 PM
Does it have any MIM parts in it?

Tommygunn
April 27, 2008, 06:35 PM
You dirty rat!:evil::evil:

(Ya gotta understand what I was expecting!!!!)

1 old 0311
April 27, 2008, 06:38 PM
Bet it is a real SOB finding a holster for that.:what:

Rachen
April 27, 2008, 06:47 PM
FourTeeFive, you better register that soon:neener:

XavierBreath
April 27, 2008, 07:10 PM
Believe it or not, US gun companies made a lot of different things. I understand that Smith & Wesson actually made a washing machine, but I've never seen one.

Rachen
April 27, 2008, 07:16 PM
Believe it or not, US gun companies made a lot of different things.

And vice versa too. Rock-Ola was a company that manufactured jukeboxes before World War II, However, when the war broke out, Rock-Ola built M1 carbines.

moooose102
April 27, 2008, 07:28 PM
either way, its a colt, and you have to handle it with care, or it can be deadly!
i wonder if this was made right after wwII?

spwenger
April 27, 2008, 07:42 PM
On the other hand I used to have a Remington 1911, so to these manufacturers I guess metal is metal.
...it was more likely made by Remington Rand, a typewriter and business-machine manufacturer that received one of many WWII contracts to produce military firearms. Union Switch & Signal was one that lost its contract to manufature 1911A1 pistols because too many were being lost as "lunchbox specials," so they ended up producing receivers for the M1 Carbine, as subcontractors for a couple of the "prime contractors."

Of note, in the production of the M1 Carbine, it was Inland Division of General Motors that first got them into serious production and made the largest number and it was other manufacturers, such as IBM and Underwood Elliott Fisher (another manufacturer of typewriters and business machines) that came up with ways to produce them more efficiently.

Jason_G
April 27, 2008, 07:46 PM
Didn't Singer (as in the sewing machines) make some 1911's during WWII?

Jason

Avenger
April 27, 2008, 07:49 PM
You HAVE to send that serial to them, maybe they can tell you when it was made!

Rachen
April 27, 2008, 08:04 PM
Didn't Singer (as in the sewing machines) make some 1911's during WWII?

Yes, and Remington/Eley did mass produce typewriters at the end of the nineteenth century.

Even nowadays, look at General Electric. They produce miniguns too, as well as many other defensive products.

And back to the older times again, Whitworth not only built the famous English sharpshooter's rifle, but also manufactured precision tooling and machinery.

elrod
April 27, 2008, 08:35 PM
Yousee, Colt did make a Hi-Power! Don't be so shocked. :eek:

Kharn
April 27, 2008, 09:36 PM
IBM made M1 carbines during WWII, Guidelamp (a division of GM) made M3 grease guns, Hydramatic Transmission (another division of GM) made M16s, etc.

Sturm Ruger's a big player in the casting industry, they make invest castings for golf clubs and all sorts of other stuff. Daewoo makes cars, assault rifles, consumer electronics and many other things.

If there's a buck to be made, you can bet some business has tried to do it.

Kharn

Big Duke Six
April 27, 2008, 09:38 PM
I was working on the renovation of the old Colt armory a few years back, and got some really cool stuff while I was there...Colt disconnects(like the one pictured), Colt fuses, Colt circuit breaker panels....If I get a chance, I'll post some pics....
I aslo found some assorted parts, an M-16 barrel-seriously rusted, flash supressor, shell casings, etc...

matt87
April 27, 2008, 10:00 PM
*Shrug* I suppose guns are mere machined and stamped metal tools. Who'd have thunk it?

Owens
April 27, 2008, 10:33 PM
I believe the "liberator" single shot .45 was also made by the GM Guidelamp division. I'm sure there is a lot of other examples of manufacture that would fit in this group.

blkbrd666
April 27, 2008, 10:37 PM
Okay, this is turning into gun trivia, so I have to throw one in. Quality Hardware and Machine made M1 Carbines during WWII. Union Switch & Signal supplied Quality with receivers at one point. So, some soldiers went to battle with a gun that was stamped Un-Quality on the receiver. Those command a premium $$$ now.

GRIZ22
April 27, 2008, 11:01 PM
I understand that Smith & Wesson actually made a washing machine, but I've never seen one.


S&W makes a lot of precison parts for a lot of things. When I went through the factory in 1997 or 98 they were making golf club heads (subcontracting for some manufacturer) and bicycles sold as S&Ws.

mgregg85
April 27, 2008, 11:03 PM
Wow, i'd love to have that steel faceplate for my hardhat.

bigjohnson
April 27, 2008, 11:26 PM
Remington actually did make 1911s. They made 21,676 of them, to be exact. They are marked "REMINGTON-UMC" on the slide, and are worth about 15 percent more than a comparable Colt, according to Flayderman's latest book.

TexasRifleman
April 27, 2008, 11:28 PM
IBM made M1 carbines during WWII, Guidelamp (a division of GM) made M3 grease guns, Hydramatic Transmission (another division of GM) made M16s, etc.

Just to add to this list, my BAR was made by the Royal Typewriter Company.

jrfoxx
April 28, 2008, 03:28 AM
Thats pretty neat. I too get a kick out all the non-gun stuff made by gun companies, and guns made by non-gun companies. I always get a kick out tof the barrel engraving of "Iver Johnson Arms & Cycle Works" on my old top break, and am awaiting word from CMP on my GM Saginaw Steering Gear M1 Carbine as we speak. Always though Rock-ola was a funny gun maker to.
Good stuff.

VARifleman
April 28, 2008, 03:55 AM
What I'm wondering is what equipment in a house would require the use of an ungrounded circuit!? Either that, or why would someone use a switch like that on a grounded circuit. Neither make sense to me.

Andy W
April 28, 2008, 09:13 AM
More info on the Liberator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator).

Hud
April 28, 2008, 09:45 AM
How 'bout this.

Hud

T J
April 28, 2008, 11:02 AM
Colt also made a product called Colt Rock. It was a pre-plastic type material I believe, and had different styles for use with pipes / tobacco. Colt also made archery equipment.
There are some old lamps (gas lamps I think) that are named Colt, but as I understand it these lamps were not made by Colt's firearms, but rather by some relative (cousin?) of Sam Colt with a totally separate company as I recall.

matt87
April 28, 2008, 12:26 PM
In this country, in days gone by the Birmingham Small Arms Company made motorbikes.

RonE
April 28, 2008, 01:24 PM
Aside from strictly firearms, Winchester probably had the most diverse product line over the years.

strat81
April 28, 2008, 01:24 PM
And didn't Ford make planes during WWII?

mnw42
April 28, 2008, 01:37 PM
I have an IBM carbine with an Underwood barrel. It amuses me to have a gun that has the barrel and receiver made by competitors in the typewriter business.

WayneConrad
April 28, 2008, 01:44 PM
And didn't Ford make planes during WWII?

Before. The legendary Ford Tri-Motor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Trimotor), 1925-1933.

Blackbeard
April 28, 2008, 02:14 PM
Hmm, made by Colt, and fires zillions of electrons with one function of the switch. You got yourself a machine gun there. Don't tell Pelosi.

FourTeeFive
April 28, 2008, 02:25 PM
What I'm wondering is what equipment in a house would require the use of an ungrounded circuit!? Either that, or why would someone use a switch like that on a grounded circuit. Neither make sense to me.

Funny enough, considering its rating, it is connected to a small transformer for the furnace/thermostat. The house was built in 1910 but converted from oil to natural gas at some point. I am guessing that is when the Colt disconnect box was installed.

oweno
April 28, 2008, 03:54 PM
Stevens Arms/Savage Arms in Chicopee Falls, Mass. made lawnmowers and freezers.

Way, Way back, they made bicycles.

Avenger
April 28, 2008, 09:02 PM
Hud, keep hold of that plane. The Winchester brand planes are VERY GOOD tools, and quite prized.

I've got a aluminum canoe made by Grumman right after the war, when they needed something for the factory to do. It's a great canoe, it even has a fitting for a mast! A bit heavy on 1-person portages, though.....

MD_Willington
April 28, 2008, 09:55 PM
Inglis in Canada did similar...

Washing machines and High Power pistols

Trebor
April 29, 2008, 12:28 AM
Even nowadays, look at General Electric. They produce miniguns too

GE hasn't made Miniguns in years. Dillon Aero makes and services Miniguns for the U.S. government now.

If you enjoyed reading about "Found a Colt in my Dad's basement" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!