ND Injuries Soar Amongst UK Cops


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30 cal slob
April 28, 2008, 08:58 AM
Sorry if I'm dredging up an older article - wasn't sure if it was posted earlier.

Before diving into the currently sorry state of UK affairs, I derive some comfort from this amicus brief in Heller vs. D.C.

http://www.gurapossessky.com/news/parker/documents/07-290bsacretiredmilitary.pdf

One could substitute LEO for "military" and "soldier."


...private ownership of firearms makes for a more effective fighting force. Military recruits with previous firearms experience and training are generally better marksmen, and accordingly, better soldiers.


Here's the sad article.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=535071&in_page_id=1770

Gun injuries soar as police 'experts' blast themselves and colleagues by mistake

By MARTIN SMITH - More by this author

Last updated at 00:13am on 16th March 2008

Comments

Soaring: Gun injuries have gone up after police officers have shot themselves - and colleagues - by mistake (file image)
The number of armed police officers accidentally shooting themselves – and other colleagues – has soared in the past five years.

Now, nearly half of all injuries caused by police shootings are the result of officers blasting themselves or a colleague, often during bungled training and demonstrations.

Since 2003, there have been seven incidents in which armed police injured themselves or a fellow officer due to the careless handling of a gun, compared to just four in the previous 12 years.

The disturbing statistics call into question the competence and training of the 6,700 officers authorised to carry firearms in the 43 police forces in England and Wales.

Recent incidents include a diplomatic protection officer shooting himself in the leg, and a sharpshooter who blew the top off his thumb. The details are revealed under the Freedom of Information Act.

But while injuries to firearms officers have increased, there has been no corresponding rise in incidents in which the members of the public are shot.

Figures obtained from 29 forces reveal that from January 2003 to September 2007 there were 21 members of the public killed or injured in operational incidents – while a further seven police and staff were wounded in shooting accidents, a quarter of the total.

But from January 2006 to September 13, 2007, when five members of the public were shot dead and two injured by armed police, five officers or police staff also suffered bullet wounds.

The forces where staff have suffered accidental injuries since 2003 are the Metropolitan Police, where there were four incidents, and one each in Sussex, Thames Valley and West Mercia.

Before an accidental injury in November 2003, the last accidental wounding of a colleague by a police marksman was in 1997.

Gill Marshall-Andrews, chair of the Gun Control Network, said: "The lesson is that people get injured when there are guns around – even when the gun user is as highly trained and specialist as a police firearms officer."

Officers authorised to carry firearms must complete a two-week training course that includes the use of the standard police-issue Glock 17 self-loading pistol, basic firearms tactics and target identification.

But most of the time is spent on the ranges learning shooting skills and weapon handling.

The number of occasions in which firearms are deployed by police has increased dramatically – in 2002, guns were authorised on 13,991 operations, but last year that figure rose to 18,053.

How officers have been wounded

Recent accidents involving police firearms include:

• A civilian control room operator was shot in the abdomen during a firearms awareness course in Kidlington, Oxfordshire, last year. A Thames Valley Police firearms officer had been showing staff his Glock pistol, unaware it was loaded.

• A Sussex police officer accidentally shot a 48-year-old PC in the body at the range at Gatwick police station in August 2007. Body armour saved him from serious injury.

• A trainee firearms officer shot a Met instructor in the thigh as he was setting up a target in a mock-up of a night-time alley in 2003.

• A diplomatic protection officer in Central London shot himself in the leg getting into a car in September 2007.

• A firearms officer from West Mercia Police shot himself in the leg and foot in January 2006 after his gun became caught in his clothing.

• An airport security officer from the Met shot the top of his thumb off when he put it in front of his MP5 sub-machine gun during training in 2005.

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Sans Authoritas
April 28, 2008, 09:45 AM
See, before the bobbies carried firearms, they just had negligent clubbings. And everyone was much better off.

-Sans Authoritas

Wes Janson
April 28, 2008, 11:26 AM
I really don't think a sample size of 7 is statistically significant.

romma
April 28, 2008, 01:18 PM
And they are the only ones professional enough to carry a firearm in all of Great Britain...

Ghost Tracker
April 28, 2008, 01:35 PM
Maybe they should only issue paintball guns until the whole concept of unarmed-to-armed LEO transition becomes a little more familiar.

MechAg94
April 28, 2008, 01:36 PM
Recent accidents involving police firearms include:

• A civilian control room operator was shot in the abdomen during a firearms awareness course in Kidlington, Oxfordshire, last year. A Thames Valley Police firearms officer had been showing staff his Glock pistol, unaware it was loaded.

• A Sussex police officer accidentally shot a 48-year-old PC in the body at the range at Gatwick police station in August 2007. Body armour saved him from serious injury.

• A trainee firearms officer shot a Met instructor in the thigh as he was setting up a target in a mock-up of a night-time alley in 2003.

• A diplomatic protection officer in Central London shot himself in the leg getting into a car in September 2007.

• A firearms officer from West Mercia Police shot himself in the leg and foot in January 2006 after his gun became caught in his clothing.

• An airport security officer from the Met shot the top of his thumb off when he put it in front of his MP5 sub-machine gun during training in 2005.
These sound like poor training, idiots fumbling with their guns, and bad holsters. Nothing some serious safety training and better equipment couldn't fix or at least help with.

That one sounded like an idiot shot the instructor downrange who was setting up targets?

That last one I have no idea. Who do you put your thumb over the barrel and fire?


The guy showing off his glock while it was loaded sounds familiar. I know a guy who had a buddy pull out his glock and do that. The guy thought he had unloaded it, but failed to check the chamber.

RancidSumo
April 28, 2008, 01:39 PM
Mabey they should stick to clubs.

CWL
April 28, 2008, 02:59 PM
I still think it is silly how Brit gun cops have to announce themselves as "Armed Police" as opposed to "Police".

SierraBT
April 28, 2008, 05:43 PM
"I say, I'm the only person in this room professional enough to handle this Glock forty."

McCall911
April 28, 2008, 06:18 PM
Let me see how this logic is:

1. Modern handguns are generally banned from legal private possession in the UK.

2. This being the case, you don't have a body of responsible, disciplined citizenry (a "militia", if you will) which are familiar with handguns or handgun safety.

3. The body of people from which you have to choose to arm in law enforcement will, before many years, all be covered by item #2.

4. Within UK law enforcement, there will be stupid, sometimes fatal accidents because of this lack of familiarity and responsibility.

I think I understand how this happens now.

DoubleTapDrew
April 28, 2008, 07:41 PM
"The lesson is that people get injured when there are guns around even when the gun user is as highly trained and specialist as a police firearms officer."

Such as...
An airport security officer from the Met shot the top of his thumb off when he put it in front of his MP5 sub-machine gun during training in 2005.
:scrutiny:
Now he's a stubby trained specialist

ClickClickD'oh
April 28, 2008, 07:48 PM
...and a sharpshooter who blew the top off his thumb

• An airport security officer from the Met shot the top of his thumb off when he put it in front of his MP5 sub-machine gun during training in 2005.


A "sharpshooter" with an MP5? Perhaps they have a slightly different definition for sharpshooter than the one I am familiar with...

Dienekes
April 28, 2008, 07:58 PM
A long-standing problem, actually. I was over there some years back and got to see the metropolitan police's training facilities, etc., and talk to some of the instructors.

The powers that be seem to want to have it both ways--to avoid an armed police generally while having some armed options. The unkind might characterize it as a mild form of schizophrenia.

BTW we needn't get too smug--my take is that the average level of firearms proficiency among US law enforcement isn't too impressive, either.

packnrat
April 28, 2008, 10:03 PM
sounds like they want to get a medical discharge....with pay.:eek:


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