Gun Cleaning: Field vs Detail Stripping


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eric.cartman
April 29, 2008, 08:02 PM
Do you field strip or detail strip your guns when cleaning them?

I ask because I shot 100 rounds through my Kahr PM9 two days ago, and I field stripped it and cleaned it to the best of my abilities.
What is frustrating however, is that I can not reach all the little places. I can see dirt on the firing pin when I pull it back, as well as on parts of the extractor. Otherwise the gun is very clean.

How much should I worry about that?
I usually detail strip my Glocks because they are so easy to take apart, but God forbid I detail strip my 1911 or other guns, that would just take hours to clean.

What say you?

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bnkrazy
April 29, 2008, 11:34 PM
I've run over 5k flawless rounds through my 229 and have never detail stripped it or any of my guns. I get most of the gunk out with a qtip but I don't even get that detailed but maybe twice a year. I'm not worried about it.

The-Fly
April 29, 2008, 11:35 PM
depends on the gun and how dirty the ammo i am running through it. My glocks only shoot jacketed ammo, so maybe 1-2 a year i detail strip the slide.

My XD sees nothing but lead, so maybe every 10-15 cleanings i strip it.

brighamr
April 30, 2008, 12:06 AM
Agree with The-Fly. With my saiga and my XD I usually field strip with a detail every 15-20 cleanings.

With my M&P, I detail strip more often just because I'm paranoid.

My 10-22, I detail strip every 500 rounds because that bulk crap ammo gets it dirty quick!

djm725
April 30, 2008, 12:47 AM
I have shot somewhere in the neighborhood of 1200 rounds through my Kahr PM9 and have never done any more than a very thorough field strip cleaning.

JesseL
April 30, 2008, 01:28 AM
For the vast majority of guns, I think field stripping is all that's ever necessary for cleaning and all the manufacturer is likely to recommend. Products like gun scrubber are good for reaching crud in all the hard to reach nooks and crannies.

Some pistols and revolvers seem so full of tiny pins screws and springs, I'd hesitate to let a watchmaker or camera repairman detail strip them.

http://www.e-gunparts.com/images/schematic/1570zP9S45.jpg

catfish101
April 30, 2008, 01:38 AM
It depends on the gun like was mentioned. I shoot allot of BP. You have to detail clean those guns.

h0ss
April 30, 2008, 01:43 AM
I usually just field strip and clean after i shoot my guns. I only detail strip every once in a while.

I own a pm9 also, and to tell you the truth, ive only detail stripped it once in the 3 years ive owned it. However, i only have shot about 700 rounds out of it. I clean after every range outing. Only 2 other pistols i own are a kahr E9 and a glock 30. I have only detail stripped each of those once too. The E9 ive had for 5 years, and the glock for 1. I did my first detail strip on my E9 just to learn so i wouldn't mess up my pm9. Then after i learned how easy it is on these auto loaders i did it to my glock as well (quite similar).

One trick i do to get the gunk off of the extractor on my pm9 is to fold a paper towel in half and run the ridge of it in between the extractor and breech face. That seems to get a lot of the crap off. Otherwise, a detail strip will enable you to get in and get it all.


EDIT: when i mentioned detail stripping, i should have mentioned i only detail stripped the slide. I dont bother with the frame because i have had no need.

JesseL
April 30, 2008, 01:44 AM
It depends on the gun like was mentioned. I shoot allot of BP. You have to detail clean those guns.

When I clean my Uberti 1858 Remington, I just remove the grips and the cylinder and wash the whole thing in hot soapy water, and re-oil.

Ragnar Danneskjold
April 30, 2008, 02:05 AM
I have never detail stripped any of my weapons, mainly because I don't know how and don't want to screw it up.

Mac45
April 30, 2008, 03:02 PM
I just field strip 'em.
I agree with JesseL, that's all you need most of the time.

Danus ex
April 30, 2008, 03:10 PM
Any time I get a new-to-me old military surplus rifle, the first thing I do is detail strip it and clean every spec of dirt I can find. However, with new guns, that's usually not necessary.

For general cleaning, though, I almost never detail strip.

OOOXOOO
April 30, 2008, 03:45 PM
I always detail strip my guns. However I don't own any guns that are difficult to strip down. The most time consuming detail strip for me would be my old Mossberg 500 and she hardly ever gets dirty since I bought a Benelli M2. I forgot to mention I will not detail my S&W 442 or my S&W Model 19 because I tried that once and ended up taking a bag of parts to my smith.:o

chbrow10
April 30, 2008, 03:49 PM
I don't think it will take hours to detail strip a 1911. With practive (5 times) it should take you 30-45 minutes.

I only detail strip my guns if they have been shot in the rain, otherwise a field strip works for me. I tend to clen my guns more often because I have seen guns that were not cleaned and preserved, a real shame.

Ske1etor
April 30, 2008, 03:54 PM
I field strip my guns when I return from the range and Detail strip them when the various springs need changing.

Noxx
April 30, 2008, 05:56 PM
I field strip after the range, and detail strip annually.

The only pair I ever sort of dread detailing are my Sigs. It's not an impossible task, but it certainly is tedious.

Black Majik
April 30, 2008, 06:23 PM
I field strip every 500 rounds, detail strip annually. I clean to ensure function... but don't make sure it's spotless with Q-tips.

CountGlockula
April 30, 2008, 06:31 PM
Field strip cleaning after every range session and detail strip once every two years.

FieroCDSP
April 30, 2008, 06:37 PM
I prefer to detail strip after purchase so that the thing is cleaned and lubed properly when I take it out the first time. After that, every six months or so. Field stripping is for regular cleaning.

21H40
April 30, 2008, 07:17 PM
Save the detail stripping for when you've got lots of time ... a nice quiet space with soft music playing ... a little bit of oil and incense :eek:

I'll perodically detail strip mine because I enjoy taking them apart and putting them back together. It also helps to see if there's anything unusual that needs further attention (rust spots or odd wear patterns).

I don't understanding owning a firearm without learning how to pop it into pieces and put it back together. On the other hand, I can understand KNOWING how to, but CHOOSING not to!

Lupinus
April 30, 2008, 07:36 PM
None of my guns get detail stripped. Just likes it's not needed to tear my car apart and rebuild it to properly maintain it, it's not needed to completely tear down and rebuild my guns.

My guns get a field strip, occasionally the nooks and crannies will get a cleaning with a spray cleaner and lube like CLP and compressed air to blow out excess.

k_dawg
April 30, 2008, 09:50 PM
I tend to only detail strip after the first one or two trips [ to make sure everything is proper ], and then after every 1K rounds or so [ to check wear, etc ].

It's more to evaluate how the parts are wearing, than to "clean" them all.

sig228
May 1, 2008, 12:56 AM
Unless your a trained gunsmith, you're just gonna screw it up and end up sending "parts" back to the factory. Owning a gun and having OCD is not really a good thing.

hankdatank1362
May 1, 2008, 01:12 AM
I've never detail stripped a handgun. Filed strip and clean after every shooting, once a week on carry pistols regardless of shooting or not (re-oil, get out lint and fuzz from clothing, etc.)

But I've been known to hose the frame and slide out with degreaser, then give it a good oil bath, shake it dry.

hankdatank1362
May 1, 2008, 01:16 AM
Oh, and JesseL, what kind of HK handgun is that? Looks like some kind of fixed-barrel blowback. I don't see a squeeze cocker... I'm clueless. I recall reading once about an HK fixed barrel pstol that was great to put a suppressor on, but it was discontinued... is that it?

Kind of Blued
May 1, 2008, 01:50 AM
I'd love to detail strip my Sig, but the manual doesn't even mention it. Maybe after a few thousand more rounds.

possum
May 1, 2008, 06:41 AM
i have never detail stripped any of the guns that i own. the only one that might be close to detailed stripped is the ar but i don't even consider that detailed stripped. i have never had any need or desire to do it. i would like to learn on my xd's, and for the 1911 platform, but for me too date i have hd zero issues with standard field stripping and maintance.

RaspberrySurprise
May 1, 2008, 07:02 AM
I've only ever detail stripped my Mosin-Nagant which isn't saying much as it's easy to do. Field stripping the AK is about halfway there as most of the parts are accessible even while still attached to the receiver. For pistols though I've never gone farther than field stripping, I've removed the extractor from my P9R but all that takes is knocking out a pin with a punch, and I wouldn't dare to take apart my Colt Trooper without an armourers manual and a gunsmith nearby.

Paragon
May 1, 2008, 07:41 AM
I don't take my guns any further apart than the manufacturer recommends, typically. After a few range sessions with my XDs though, I'll oil them heavily and blow the oil out with my air compressor. 90 PSI does a pretty good job of getting rid of dirt and debris.

floydster
May 1, 2008, 09:54 AM
The best thing you can have to clean your guns is a mini compressor,
Harbor Frieght has one for $50.00, turn the air down to around 20lbs, field strip the piece down ,spray with Rem oil and blow dry. There will still be enough oil on the gun for function.
This is how the Police range does it in my area.
Floydster

ZeSpectre
May 1, 2008, 10:32 AM
I'd love to detail strip my Sig, but the manual doesn't even mention it.
Depending on the SIG you need "special tools" and a couple of replacement pins (a couple of the 229 retaining pins are supposed to be "one time use").

I tend to detail strip/disassemble all of my firearms when I first get them and give everything a good inspection/cleanup/lube. After that It's generally just field strip unless there is some indication of an issue.

The best thing you can have to clean your guns is a mini compressor,
Harbor Frieght has one for $50.00, turn the air down to around 20lbs, field strip the piece down ,spray with Rem oil and blow dry.

I've been known to do the same. Remember, wear eye protection if you do this!

blkbrd666
May 1, 2008, 10:54 AM
I was wondering when someone was going to mention air. I use an array of different sized paint brushes with natural bristles and aerosol oils to clean everything...then blast out with the air hose. If you're worried about the moisture in the air tank, you can purchase a condensation trap/regulator like they use in paint shops. I may get flamed for this one...WD-40 makes a good cleaning solvent as long as you blow it all out of the gun, then go back and spray down with something like RemOil...I always use it on the first cleaning when I purchase a used gun or surplus gun...use it to "dry-clean" my racing bicycle too rather than washing with water every time. I don't particularly like WD as an oil, but it's a great cleaning solvent. I don't see how modern man gets by without compressed air...I guess growing up in a shop, I have found thousands of uses for it.

JesseL
May 1, 2008, 12:18 PM
Oh, and JesseL, what kind of HK handgun is that? Looks like some kind of fixed-barrel blowback. I don't see a squeeze cocker... I'm clueless. I recall reading once about an HK fixed barrel pstol that was great to put a suppressor on, but it was discontinued... is that it?

That's an H&K P9s45 (http://world.guns.ru/handguns/hg53-e.htm). I believe it uses a roller delayed blowback mechanism, like the cz52 and H&K rifles. It could be the one you read about, I'm not sure. I do know it has a shocking number of little parts.

berkbw
May 1, 2008, 07:32 PM
OK -
[FLAME: ON]
It has been MANY years since I have used WD40 for anything. These days I use aero-kroil, or something similar.

The problem which I experienced having to repair prematurely worn parts was WD40 left a coating [I know, they say no silicon] on parts which, upon drying, would NOT hold a coating of oil. This coating was a lubricant, but the short side of it was it did NOT last until the next maintanance. And oil wouldn't stick to take up the slack in performance. This is why I do not use or own WD40.

I could probably find 100 techs with the same experiences and predjudices.

Maybe it is not as it was.

[FLAME:OFF]

Berk Walker

skinewmexico
May 1, 2008, 08:17 PM
I field strip my XD every case. Don't plan to ever detail strip it.

nyggis
May 2, 2008, 04:48 AM
The grade of care depends on the weather and guns used..

After a day at the range with snow and rain I clean and oil my guns more meticulous than a sunny dry day. My Mauser and Tikka:s get more attention than my 10/22 and 1300 Defender.

My Mauser M/96 is in mint condition, so I keep a army cleaning kit in my car so I can start to clean it while itīs still warm.. Barrel, bolt, and a thin film of oil on all metal surfaces. Some stock oil when she gets home...

Itīs important not to be too serious with detail stripping/cleaning.

An investigation in the Swedish army showed that many of the modified FN-FNC:s used in troop education was so worn by intense cleaning that they had lost their factory rust protecting treatment, so that they would be unfit for field use... :cuss:

"Do it again - Do it right..."

NG VI
May 2, 2008, 02:26 PM
Hank that looks to me like a P9s.

I am with Tauruowner and sig228, I am confident I could get my guns more apart then filed stripped, but I don't think I could get them back together.

Lupinus
May 4, 2008, 09:03 PM
An investigation in the Swedish army showed that many of the modified FN-FNC:s used in troop education was so worn by intense cleaning that they had lost their factory rust protecting treatment, so that they would be unfit for field use

This is one of the top two reasons I don't detail strip to clean. It simply isn't needed, the firearm is designed to be cleaned properly with a field strip. Because of this parts and pieces are not designed to be constantly taken apart and put back together. This actually causes more wear on the parts because they aren't designed for it.

GRIZ22
May 4, 2008, 11:02 PM
There is generally no need to detail strip a handgun or rifle. I have some guns 25-30 years and they have never been detailed stripped and are running fine.

I have had guns totally immersed in salt water, rinsed them with fresh water, WD40 to get rid of the water, and then Brake Kleen to get rid of the WD40. No problems.

Blackpowder guns may need to be stripped more often.

don
May 5, 2008, 12:28 AM
JesseL, I am a camera repairman and I will not completely stip my Ruger 22/45 down to clean it, nor did I ever strip my Marlin model 60. I use electronic parts cleaner (CRC brand) and simply give the firearm a good spray/flush cleaning and then spray some light weight lube into the mechanism. I then follow up with a compressed air blow job. The reason I use CRC brand electronic parts cleaner is that it doesn't contain M.E.K. or acetone which can damage plastic/polycarbonate parts.

Old Fud
May 5, 2008, 12:47 AM
HOW do you detail strip any gun?

I've got S&W revolvers as well as M&P pistols.
I've got Kahr.
I've got 1911's from Springfield, Bear, Smith and Colt.

Every single user manual clearly states, "Do NOT strip past the point we describe", and then shows field-stripping only.

I have yet to see an instruction anywhere that shows how to tear a pistol down further than that level.

Smith Revolvers don't even mention removing the grips, much less dealing with what you will find if you do.

PLEASE -- tell me where you get the information from which you are able to DECIDE if you want to detail strip or not?

Fud

The Canuck
May 5, 2008, 02:13 AM
I field strip after every session and detail strip about once a year.

dmazur
May 5, 2008, 04:02 AM
I have yet to see an instruction anywhere that shows how to tear a pistol down further than that level.

Things have changed. I have a manual for a Ruger .44 Carbine that shows how to take the trigger group off, remove the bolt & magazine tube, etc. after recommending that it isn't normally necessary for cleaning.

I have a manual for a 70 Series Colt Commander (OK, it technically isn't a 70 series as that only applies to the spring finger bushing Govt model, but it's from that era...) which also shows details for full disassembly, after saying its not necessary to go past removing the slide.

However, I also have a manual for an 80 Series Colt Commander which definitely does not go beyond removing the slide.

The lawyers have gotten into everything. It used to be your decision to take the gun apart and then take it to a gunsmith in a cardboard box...now it's assumed you have no business doing that.

moooose102
May 5, 2008, 07:51 AM
mostly i feild strip. but, when things seem a little dirtier than i like, and i do not have time to do a full disassembly, i use "GUN SCRUBBER". IT IS AN ARESOL CAN OF PRESSURIZED CLEANING SOLVENT THAT IS SAFE FOR USE ON FIREARMS, THEN I BLOW DRY IT WITH COMPRESSED AIR. FOLLOW THAT UP WITH A SPRAYDOWN OF "REM OIL" AGAIN FOLLOWED BY LESS PRESSURE COMPRESSED AIR. AND I HAVE A VERY CLEAN GUN. ONCE A YEAR. I SCHEDULE A TEAR DOWN OF ALL BUT MY LEVER GUNS. SOMEDAY, I SHOULD TAKE THEM TO A GUNSMITH FOR A THOUROUGH CLEANING.

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