Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?


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rugerman07
May 1, 2008, 05:25 AM
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. I'm not being critical here, it's certainly your right to do so. But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?

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Pilot
May 1, 2008, 05:33 AM
Your home is where your family resides and contains your valuable possesions. Incidents of home invasions occur everyday. Why not be armed when you are protecting what you value most? Yes, there are locked doors and windows seperating you and the criminals, but these are easily defeated. The time you need a gun may be the time its sitting in a safe or drawer and you can't get to it in time.

AlaskaErik
May 1, 2008, 05:36 AM
It's simply easier to continue carrying while at home. Yes, I do feel safe in my own home, but home invasions do occur on a regular basis. The closest one to my home was less than a mile away. Also, I like to be armed when I answer the door. You never know who's knocking.

Dksimon
May 1, 2008, 05:38 AM
It is just a matter of being prepared. If you have your gun stashed in your bedroom and you are at the other end of the house in your kitchen and someone breaks in through the front door how are you supposed to make it to youre firearm?

papajohn
May 1, 2008, 05:51 AM
I started carrying all the time when I lived in the middle of nowhere, now that I live in the inner city I am even more adamant about it. I ran the list of Registered Sex Offenders in my zip code, and found out that I'm apparently the only guy within five blocks (almost) who isn't a convicted felon, pedophile, or rapist. And those are just the Sex Criminals. Murderers, thieves, burglars and other violent psychos aren't listed.

My gun goes on with my trousers in the morning, and I also have one in every room. If I need one, I need it NOW, not after I get the safe key, go to the room with the safe, unlock it, select a weapon, and check its loaded status.

As Cooper used to say (and I quote him a lot) "You can't make an appointment for an emergency".

Papajohn

Kind of Blued
May 1, 2008, 06:45 AM
Dust bunnies.

ForeignDude
May 1, 2008, 07:01 AM
Carry at home is the only method that ensures the following two conditions:

(1) Weapon is fully ready, and within immediate reach, in the event of a home invasion;
(2) Weapon cannot be accessed by children in the home without your explicit knowledge/consent.

moooose102
May 1, 2008, 07:03 AM
my gun is never (except for hospital and dr office or anywhere else ccw regulations prohibit it) more than an arms length away. at night, it is under my pillow, during the day, in my pocket and or in my waist band. do i feel safe at home, sure. but, i am disabled, if somebody was trying to force his way in, harm my children, etc. i wouldn't be able to put up much of a fight. so, my only option would be to defend ourselves in the only other manner i can. hopefully, this will NEVER happen. but if it does, i will not let somebody grab my kids and do untold horrific things to them. this is NOT to say i am trigger happy. i am very much aware of the fact that in the course of taking someone elses life, i may end up with signifigant mental anguish. but if i am FORCED into doing this, i would rather deal with that guilt, than deal with the guilt of doing nothing while my kids are raped/mutilated/killed/etc. etc. I WILL DEFEND THEM, TO MY DEATH if necessary.

Zedicus
May 1, 2008, 07:07 AM
(1) Weapon is fully ready, and within immediate reach, in the event of a home invasion;
(2) Weapon cannot be accessed by children in the home without your explicit knowledge/consent.

Got it all in one post! :)

shooter45
May 1, 2008, 07:09 AM
I agree with all of the other answers, but would like to add that carrying at home builds confidence in the gear you will carry on the street. For example, I have a new holster for my Kimber and I am breaking it in at home where I can adjust it with out everyone knowing I am carrying.

Kind of Blued
May 1, 2008, 07:14 AM
Family members also make for good guinea pigs when testing concealability of a new holster/gun. That is if they don't assume you have a gun on you at all times. :)

mbt2001
May 1, 2008, 07:15 AM
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. I'm not being critical here, it's certainly your right to do so. But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?

(1) Weapon is fully ready, and within immediate reach, in the event of a home invasion;
(2) Weapon cannot be accessed by children in the home without your explicit knowledge/consent.

+1

Also, a holstered gun is one of the most effective and safest ways to carry. Guns only "go off" when they are being handled. Having it in the holster means it is at hand and safe (by safe I mean it can't go off from handeling b/c you are not handeling it, it is in the holster...)

While it sounds odd, the more you have handeled loaded guns, the more you understand carrying in a holster.

Carl N. Brown
May 1, 2008, 07:33 AM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home? ... Do you feel unsafe at home?

Of the eight murders on my hometown in three recent years,
- woman slashed in home invasion at a boarding house,
- man and woman beaten to death with baseball bat another home invasion,
- two men shot death in a business break-in,
I could look up the other three, but those five show good reason to feel unsafe at home and to go armed at home. True, the two couples killed in home invasions were involved in drugs and were killed for drugs or money to buy drugs. But, the woman in the boarding house was an innocent victim of a home invader.

Perhaps carry at home makes more sense than carry on a public street: cops can patrol on public streets, they cannot patrol inside private homes. And if cops cannot always be there when you are mugged on a public street, they certainly cannot be there when you are mugged by a home invader.

----------------------

After reading some of the other posters' comments, I must add I test holster and gun and carry techniques at home before going out. (It is better to discover a gun will slip out of a particular holster while moving about your kitchen than to find it out in public.)

1911 guy
May 1, 2008, 07:37 AM
Why do you carry your car insurance policy number in your glovebox? Don't you trust your driving?

Everything bad always happens to "The Other Guy". To someone else, YOU are "The Other Guy".

Walkalong
May 1, 2008, 07:37 AM
Unfortunately, our homes are not as safe as we would like them to be. I do not carry at home. Some weapons are always fairly handy, but not on my person.

foghornl
May 1, 2008, 07:38 AM
You never know when war will come to you.

StrawHat
May 1, 2008, 07:40 AM
One less decision to make.

When I made the decision to carry, I decided to carry 24/7.

I don't have to think "should I carry to..." it is already in place.

Ragnar Danneskjold
May 1, 2008, 07:55 AM
ForeignDude nailed it. But I'll add that home invasions occur with disregard to whether yoiu're home or where you are in your home. There's no rule that says bad guys have to break in while you're away, or at night while you're asleep and your shotgun is close by. And if there were such a rule, they'd break it cause they're bad guys :P A break in can just as easily happen while you're in the office doing taxes, or in the basement or anywhere else. Don't you want to be ready? Or are you going to tell the BG "hold on, I'm not ready for you, let me go unlock my safe in the other room real fast and grab my weapon, then you can continue with your break in"

Jdude
May 1, 2008, 08:05 AM
I keep it next to my computer or in my sleeping room, wherever I happen to be mostly that day. I do it primarily to scuff and ding my holster to see if it actually holds up to my average use.

Oh and my gun is pretty.

Bubbles
May 1, 2008, 08:07 AM
I have a toddler. My home-defense handgun is safer on my hip than in my purse, on a table, in my nightstand, etc.

Ric in Richmond
May 1, 2008, 08:10 AM
Ask the Harvey's if a gun on your person would of been handy....oh wait...you can't now....

http://www.crimelibrary.com/news/original/0106/0202_harvey_family_murders.html

http://www.crimelibrary.com/news/original/0106/0302_harvey_killers_in_house1.html

KI.W.
May 1, 2008, 08:36 AM
Thruly ****ty;"You never know when war will come to yuo".(mr Foghorn).
I know, never to me. I can to live with my guns (only 14) in the safetybox. Very sorry for you.

TheLastBoyScout
May 1, 2008, 08:49 AM
Why carry a holstered gun at home?

Because its

a) Safer-the weapon is under your direct control at all times.
b) Quicker-self explanatory
c) Convenient-don't have to take the holster on/off when you go out, don't have to engage in unneccessary admin gunhandling.
d) Less likely to result in a weapon being left out easy to steal when you leave the house.
e) Less likely to freak out anti relatives than an AR or Mossberg propped up on the nightstand "cruiser ready"

esq_stu
May 1, 2008, 08:53 AM
"Oh, excuse me, Mr. home invader while I run to my bedroom night table [or safe, or cupboard] and get my gun."

I spend at least half my life at home - about 12 hours a day. I have read about lots of home invasions perhaps just as many as muggings. I see no difference in the need to be armed at home and away from home.

thunder173
May 1, 2008, 09:20 AM
Why NOT?? Yes,...I feel safe at home because I make it that way, along with smoke detectors, fire extinguishers, and first aid kits. I live along a busy rural highway, and have no idea who may come to my door,...day or night. I have no younger children at home, but often have "company" that brings their young inquisitive children to my home, and the occasional visits of equally inquisitive young grandsons. When they are expected,....the house is "swept" and anything I have out is secured,....except what is on me. If company arrives unexpectedly, ... I discreetly "tidy" things up as I can, and secure the area. I never leave firearms lying about in plain site, but both myself and my wife know where they are. I often carry while at home,... and if it's not ON me,..one is very close at hand.

Disaster
May 1, 2008, 09:27 AM
Because that is the only way you can insure the BG won't get between you and your firearm.

I figure it is all a game of odds. The more you have your concealed with you, the less likely you are to not have it when you need it.

I've only been accosted once...two armed felons...one with a knife, the other with a gun. Guess where it happened.

doc540
May 1, 2008, 09:33 AM
I carry at home using a SmartCarry mainly because I somehow missed getting my name on the the BG's broadcast email of their schedules.

Now if they would only let me know in advance when and where they planned to appear I'd only carry at those times and in those places.

Ok, a straight answer: the SmartCarry is so comfortable I put it on every morning like I do my pants and belt. It's just become a part of my daily dressing routine.

So, it's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it regardless of where I am, at home or on the go.

springmom
May 1, 2008, 09:37 AM
I work from my home. I am the only woman at home in the neighborhood during the day. One of our neighbors (a guy) also works from home. He carries too.

During the daylight hours, a suburban neighborhood is a prime target for burglary. It isn't even all that unlikely a scenario. I don't have to remember where I put the gun; I don't have to worry that guns I have stashed in different rooms will be picked up by the burglars.

I carry for the same reason I wear my seatbelts every time I drive...for that unlikely event, just in case.

Springmom

Pilgrim
May 1, 2008, 09:39 AM
I know where it is, always.

thegriz
May 1, 2008, 10:01 AM
I've had a few surprises at my home. You never can know for sure when the kids will just open the door for a stranger or leave a door open (no matter how much you drill it into them). Sometimes you need a gun "right now". Carrying is a good way to accomplish that. If you are physically uncomfortable carrying your pistol, you may need a different configuration (different holster, different position, different pistol, etc). Pick up a little Kel-Tec 380 or that new little Ruger or something and you probably won't even feel it throughout the day. I put up my 40 in the evenings and continue carrying the Kel-Tec.

You asked for reasons and got some pretty good reasons. Now it's just a matter of deciding what you want to do. I don't see a need to convert somebody one way or the other as long as the facts are out there.

As for the poster who feels sorry for us - don't bother. We're doing what we want to do - just like you.

doc540
May 1, 2008, 10:09 AM
"I carry for the same reason I wear my seatbelts every time I drive...for that unlikely event, just in case.

Springmom"

Can't argue with mom logic! :D

And your artwork is positively divine. ;)

K-Romulus
May 1, 2008, 10:45 AM
Aside from the readiness factor, home carry could be seen as "familiarity training" where you are staying used to constantly having the weight on your hip. Think of it as "immersion" learning, especially for folks like me that live in states where CCW is heavily restricted. Since I only get to CCW a few times a month (if at all) when out of state, carry at home is the only way I can keep sharp the skill set and carry mentality (i.e., comfort with the whole idea of carrying).

Sniper X
May 1, 2008, 10:51 AM
Rugerman, here in NM that is where you are most at risx. I also might add that being a hillbilly, redneck,gun nut, physcho,( insert liberal tag here), myself. And living on a small ten acre ranch, up in the wild mountains east of Albuquerqur, it is responsible to carry a holstered gun all the time since we have mountain lions, bears and coyotes that come on the land frequently. I also think that if everyone law abiding did carry all the time and especially in their home, we would see criminals get a job at McDonnalds or learn internet crime because they would no longer feel safe to prey on the less able.

Wopasaurus
May 1, 2008, 10:52 AM
I don't carry at home, only for the fact that there are no kids around, and my girlfriend and I live in a one bedroom apartment.

We do have a gun in the bedroom closet, one in the kitchen stashed away, and when I'm not carrying mine, it's next to me on the stand next to the couch, or it's on the nightstand next to the bed when I sleep.

We lock them away when there are visitors that don't know us present, but other than that, there usually is not a firearm more than 5 feet away at any given time.

offthepaper
May 1, 2008, 10:58 AM
Simple
Better to have one at the ready and not need it, than to need it and not have it at the ready. :D

shadowalker
May 1, 2008, 11:05 AM
I carry at home because it is my default mode, if I am not legally encumbered I am carrying, it is just part of me, handgun and spare magazines, keys, surefire, wallet, cell phone. I carry about 80 hours a week and find it both comfortable and comforting.

At home is also where I am at most risk, it is where I spend the majority of my time (other than work), is where the people are I want to defend the most, and happens to have the things the bad guys want to take.

Being in a nice neighborhood increases your risk in my opinion, they have the things the BGs want to take and the homeowners are more likely to fall into a false sense of security because they live in a "nice" neighborhood.

Bad humans aside in the last week we have had two bad violent dog attacks in the valley, one has left a three year old in a coma, one on a 4 month pregnant lady.

Others have made a good point of the safest place for having a gun, especially around kids, is in a holster on the belt. I don't worry about concealment at home, everyone in my immediate family expects me to be carrying. There hasn't been a day in the life of my 6 month old daughter that I haven't carried, she'll grow up with it being "normal" :).

Like offthepaper said I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it. The thing that cause me to need a gun aren't going to give me a timeout so I can get ready.

Taurus 66
May 1, 2008, 11:08 AM
But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?

Not any longer now that I carry.

DoubleTapDrew
May 1, 2008, 11:09 AM
I imagine one would feel pretty stupid for going through the inconvenience of carrying and being prepared while out and about, only to die at the hands of a bad person while in their own home because they couldn't get to their gun in time.

JesseL
May 1, 2008, 12:29 PM
Thruly ****ty;"You never know when war will come to yuo".(mr Foghorn).
I know, never to me. I can to live with my guns (only 14) in the safetybox. Very sorry for you.

Yep we all know Finland has never been invaded.:rolleyes:

Seriously, I carry almost any time I'm awake and wearing clothes. I don't do it because I'm scared. I do it because I believe that it's my right and duty as a free man, a husband, and a father; to be prepared.

Even if I were absolutely certain that I was living in the safest place and time in all of human history, I would still carry all the time. I want to keep things safe.

papajohn
May 1, 2008, 12:47 PM
I work armed, and I know how difficult it is to remain alert at all times......it's nearly impossible not to get distracted, self-involved, sleepy, or whatever. My home is the one place I let myself do ALL of those things. If the gun is on my hip, in the same state of readiness all the time, and I practice with it that way, I don't have to wonder if there's a round in the chamber, or if I need to wipe off the safety as I draw. I just DO it, the same way, every time.

I carry a variety of guns, depending on my where and why, and I have trained myself to know each gun by feel, and to intrinsically know the operating system from the feel. My hand knows the difference in operating systems and conditions of the guns by how they feel.......the heavy one is always kept hammer down on a loaded chamber, safety off. The fat one always has the safety on, and a round in the chamber. The revolvers are even simpler. And in spite of what some say, I ALWAYS count my rounds when I shoot. One gun holds five, one holds six, another holds eight, and the other holds 12. It's always nice to know when the gun is about to run dry, so you can start grabbing your reload!

Papajohn

Superlite27
May 1, 2008, 12:57 PM
But, I have to ask why?

Because I am not the one who chooses when and where I get attacked.


Do you feel unsafe at home?

Do I have to feel unsafe to be unsafe? I can feel perfectly comfey and still get killed. Feeling safe and being safe are two different things.

Bottom line: With a gun, I AM safe no matter how I feel. Why wouldn't I have it on me at home? Do criminals only attack people if they're not at home?

csmkersh
May 1, 2008, 01:04 PM
Responsibly Armed


By Finn Aagaard - Biography

I carry my pistol always, whenever the law permits, inside or outside the house; at night it goes under my pillow, where I have slept with one on and off for 45 years. Am I utterly paranoid, do I feel that evil out to get me is lurking everywhere, am I so ruled by fear that I must have my security blanket at all times?

No. To think so would be to completely misunderstand the role of the personal gun in my life. My pistol, combined with some competence in its use, has indeed been a wonderful comfort in a few potentially unpleasant circumstances, and the knowledge I can retain command of my immediate environment does tend to encourage a calm self-confidence in everyday life, while precluding panic in an emergency.

The chief virtue of the pistol is that I wear it; you do not have to go and fetch it when criminal violence threatens with shocking suddenness ‘out of the blue,’ as can happen even in peaceful Llano County, Texas, where I live. If you have time to fetch a gun, you would do better to grab a shotgun, probably. Wear your pistol, keep all other firearms locked away. On you, it is safe from kids and other unauthorized persons, you do not have to remember where you stashed it or fumble with the combination lock of a pistol safe. It is there, instantly ready to protect you and your family. On the street concealed carry is usually required either by law or social usage and has the advantage of protecting everyone, even antigun liberals, because criminals cannot tell which of their potential victims might be armed.

Yet my pistol is more than just security. Like an Orthodox Jew’s yarmulke or a Christian cross, it is a symbol of who I am, what I believe and the moral standards by which I live. It symbolizes the Social Contract between myself and society and declares that I am no mere subject but a free and independent citizen of the Republic who holds inalienable rights while honoring the responsibilities that accompany those rights. My pistol states that I will defend the common weal, that I will uphold what is right and decent and that I am willing and able to protect myself and mine. (The police cannot and are not required to protect the individual person or family. They are spread too thin for that. When called they will do their best, but all too often they can get there only in time to clean up the aftermath. You are responsible for your own safety.)

My pistol is my family's shield, my guarantee that upon my life I will let no evil touch them. When a malefactor demands, Your dignity and your money, or your life!" my pistol introduces a very sobering third alternative: No - if you persist in this criminal endeavor, it is your life that will be at hazard."

Many people will suggest that the contents of your wallet are not worth jeopardizing your life for, just hand it over to the thug and move on. By doing so you are encouraging crime - success ensures the robber will seek another victim. I consider it to be a citizen's duty (a hard word to the me generation) to resist attempted violent crime by all means at his disposal, even at considerable risk to himself. Remember, action is always faster than reaction (unless your assailant has the reaction time of a Bill Jordan). Dissemble, pretend to go along. 'I don't w-w-want any trouble, you can have my wallet, I'm getting it out of my hip pocket now.' As your hand closes on your gun, yell: "Look out, behind you!" Side-step as you present the pistol , and when he turns back your front sight rests squarely on his chest. With variations to suit the particular circumstances, this sort of ploy will work far more often than most victims would believe. Statistics suggest that an intended victim who resists with a firearm is by a good margin less likely to be injured than one who does not resist at all. On the other hand, the surest way to survive a gunfight is not to get into one. Stay alert and avoid potentially bad situations if you possibly can.

Research by Professor John Lott, Gary Kleck and others into the effects of concealed carry laws prove beyond quibbling that they reduce violent crime quite considerably. Since it began to license responsible citizens to carry arms, Florida's murder rate has sunk from 36 percent above the national average to well below it, and overall the decline in violent crime in states with concealed carry laws (compared to the others) runs at east 15 percent for murder, II percent for robberies and 9 percent for rape, according to Professor Lott. Private citizens are said to use firearms in self-defense as often as a million times a year. In the vast majority of these incidents no blood is shed; the thug flees or surrenders. Nevertheless, it is claimed that private citizens justifiably in twice as many criminals as the entire law enforcement establishment in any given year.

Obviously, an armed and responsible citizenry is a very potent force in keeping crime in check. In many nations where private citizens are denied firearms - as most recently in Australia - violent crime is on the upswing, whereas in the U.S. the rate is declining.

However, the right to be armed does not depend on these facts; it goes way back to our very beginnings. Long before the Second Amendment and the rights acknowledged by English Common Law traditions, the right of a free man to bear arms was recognized by almost every culture or civilization that comes to mind. Until well into this sorry century, free men were armed, and like the yeomen of England and our own militia, they constituted the backbone of their societies.

Every right includes commitments, not least the right to bear arms. Anyone who carries a pistol in public has an obligation to society to be reasonably competent with it, able to hit his target - under stress - rather than uninvolved bystanders; he must know and abide by the laws limiting the use of lethal force; he must avoid quarrels and altercations and understand that he will be held to higher standards of restraint and responsibility than an unarmed person. The course of instruction that is rightly required (in addition to background checks) in order to earn a Texas Concealed Handgun License teaches all this, and more, including conflict resolution. Passing a shooting test is mandatory, but the class does not include shooting instruction; you are expected to have arranged for adequate training beforehand. It is a fine course; anybody who intends to go armed ought to take a similar one.

My pistol has aided no evil, it has added not a tittle of gratuitous violence to the world. On the contrary, its presence on my hip or on the Land Rover seat very definitely defused a couple of dangerous situations in the old days in Kenya. More recently, on a dark street, I am convinced the mere suspicion of its presence, engendered by my alert, confident demeanor, averted what could otherwise have been a nasty incident. Colt got it right; a pistol in the hands of a decent, courageous citizen is a convincing peacemaker. My pistol is a positive influence for stability, for decency, for righteousness, for freedom from fear and violence, for all that is right and proper. (If anyone can present a rational argument that factually disproves this statement, I will discard the gun and never carry it again.)

One's self-image matters a great deal; it is what charts one's course through life. If I refuse to compromise my integrity, my self-respect and what the Founding Fathers referred to as their sacred honor, it is because ray image of myself will not permit it. Self-images are complex, of course. Basically I see myself as a sound and responsible citizen, a scrupulously law-abiding, friendly, reasonable, middle-class, normally intelligent and fairly well educated paterfamilias with some understanding of true values who has been blessed beyond his deserts in this life and is truly grateful.

At the very root and foundation of my being, though, I am a warrior - a very mild one, but a warrior nevertheless - as any man must be to some degree. My pistol symbolizes that as such I will not be coerced by fear or by any political, social or physical threats whatsoever into doing anything I consider dishonorable or unworthy of my self-respect. You can push me only so far, but no farther. It symbolizes the positive side of the warrior spirit, which is the one force that can maintain respect for the law, stability, freedom, peace and decency in this world. Without it we are done.

Warriors and hunters tend to be fascinated by fine personal arms and will often cherish one above all others, far beyond its utility as a tool. That is why embellished firearms are commonplace, while engraved carpenter's hammers are not. I dote on my Colt Officer's ACP carry gun, and delight in its presence on my hip. Now do you begin to understand what my pistol means to me?

Be that as it may, our body of armed citizens has always been a potent force for law and order, liberty and all that is good in the land. If we allow the hoplophobic left to destroy it on an emotional whim, to make themselves 'feel good,' or in accordance with their unrealistic and failed political philosophy, we will come to rue the day.

loneviking
May 1, 2008, 01:04 PM
Well, let me tell you a story. One bitterly cold winter night, I'm sitting at my 'puter and typing online, unarmed---and it's 11:30p.m.

All of a sudden, outside the window the 'puter is on (which faces onto my fenced back yard), all hell breaks loose. I had a Great Pyrenees dog to keep the yard safe, and it sounded like he tangled with something. I jump up, run around the corner of the room and out the back door onto the back porch. The dog box is right there alongside the porch. My dog and a big racoon are going at it tooth and nail inside the box. The racoon hears me and comes hurtling out of the box ready to chew me up. Fortunately, the dog grabbed the coon and the fight resumed giving me time to go back inside and get the shotgun. I ventilated the monster with three rounds of buckshot. I weighed him after it was all over and he weighed 35 lbs!

The point though is that I was unarmed, and this coon was sick. If the dog hadn't grabbed him, he would have been all over me and there wouldn't have been much I could do.

Yep, just a peaceful evening at home, unarmed.....and then all hell breaks loose. Never, ever again!

Sav .250
May 1, 2008, 01:29 PM
I`ve never thought about it but in some parts of US of A it might be a good idea.

Zundfolge
May 1, 2008, 01:31 PM
Its also about developing the habit of carrying.

Not carrying while you're at home is like not wearing your seatbelt on short trips ... all you do is get out of the habit of always carrying and the day you really need your gun you'll realize you left it at home.

.cheese.
May 1, 2008, 01:32 PM
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/broward/story/512175.html

that's why.

I feel particularly bad about this incident because I know Edward (the son). We went to college together and b/c we were in the same major, we had a bunch of classes together. We were friends during that time, although I have not spoken to him much since graduation (no particular reason why). I once got into a conversation with him about the pros of having a gun, and more importantly - carrying it. I wish... I really wish... I had pressed the issue more. I feel like I've failed. Had Edward, or Olidia, or one of her kids had a gun on them, perhaps things would be different today. :(

Frankly the incident has had me fairly upset for several days now.

romma
May 1, 2008, 01:37 PM
I can tell you how long it takes for someone to bash through a door.

.5 seconds. Is your gun on, or near you? Or is it in a safe where you can't reach it.

I remember a story of a home invasion/robbery in this area a few years ago where the home owner and family was home, guns were locked up and the criminals came in, tied the family up, robbed and beat them, took his guns and threatened to take his life with them.

Not that it matters how someone kills you if the kill you.

I have had personal experience that I have posted here in which I was glad that my pistol was in arms reach in the middle of the night.

I keep my gun on me or next to me at home.

bruss01
May 1, 2008, 01:39 PM
When I'm at home, 90% of my time is spent either on the living room sofa or in the kitchen, or in bed. Because of the way our home is laid out, I am never more than 4-5 steps away from a loaded firearm. The 90 lb Doberman we own will buy me time to take those 4-5 steps, I'm pretty sure.

That's good enough for me, I don't feel the need to tote iron around 24/7 just because of if/when/maybe. Yes, home invasions happen, but they most often happen to the unwary.

TallPine
May 1, 2008, 01:40 PM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?

Because it is so much safer and more comfortable that just sticking it behind your belt or shoving it in a hip pocket ;)

WayneConrad
May 1, 2008, 02:28 PM
If I just leave it on the night stand, the pink elephants can get to it. And they're not to be trusted.

PocoDiablo
May 1, 2008, 02:47 PM
Well, let me tell you a story. One bitterly cold winter night, I'm sitting at my 'puter and typing online, unarmed---and it's 11:30p.m.

All of a sudden, outside the window the 'puter is on (which faces onto my fenced back yard), all hell breaks loose. I had a Great Pyrenees dog to keep the yard safe, and it sounded like he tangled with something. I jump up, run around the corner of the room and out the back door onto the back porch. The dog box is right there alongside the porch. My dog and a big racoon are going at it tooth and nail inside the box. The racoon hears me and comes hurtling out of the box ready to chew me up. Fortunately, the dog grabbed the coon and the fight resumed giving me time to go back inside and get the shotgun. I ventilated the monster with three rounds of buckshot. I weighed him after it was all over and he weighed 35 lbs!

The point though is that I was unarmed, and this coon was sick. If the dog hadn't grabbed him, he would have been all over me and there wouldn't have been much I could do.

Yep, just a peaceful evening at home, unarmed.....and then all hell breaks loose. Never, ever again!
Almost the same thing happened to me yesterday afternoon.

The gardener just got done mowing the lawn, I paid him, and then let the 3 dogs out in the yard (2 Great Danes, one Akita). Almost immediately they see something moving by the garbage can and run right for it. Yes, a raccoon is back there.

All heck breaks loose - 3 dogs (almost 400 pounds of dog here, folks) versus a baby raccoon that probably weighed 15 pounds top. Lots of yelping, barking growing, and alien raccoon noises. Between me and the three dogs the best I can do is to pull the two Danes off by their collars while this little raccoon is getting tossed around like a rag doll, and the Akita thankfully obeys my commands to get back.

The raccoon gets the hell outta there.

Now, I carry, every day, everywhere, and I was carrying at the time. I knew I needed to capture or kill that raccoon so I could have it tested for rabies. However, there was practically no chance of letting go of either of my dogs and being able to draw and shoot before they all got together again.

Of course, I checked with my vet about what to do, and they reported me to animal control, who has now given me 3 days to get their rabies vaccinations booster (no biggie) but I also have to quarantine one dog for 45 days (in home, no biggies) but the other two dogs have to have 180 day quarantines in a DOUBLE WALLED enclosure with no contact with other animals or people.

This will cause my considerable headache and financial costs.

Looking back, I wish I had the opportunity to shoot that bugger.

And the funny thing is that I never in my life ever thought I would be in any kind of a situation where I'd think about pulling a gun.

I was wrong.

coloradokevin
May 1, 2008, 03:17 PM
I carry in public, but not in my home.

I have a couple of reasons for this:

1) We have no children, so not all of my guns are in the safe. Thus, the "go unlock safe and find and load gun" approach is invalid for my personal situation.

2) If someone is breaking into my home, I have no doubt that I can make it to a weapon before they enter.

3) A biggie for me: You can't be "On" 24/7/365 for an entire lifetime. Everyone needs down-time, and home is my down time. To some people I think it is part of the hobby/fantasy to always be armed and waiting for an attack... It is a career reality for me, and while I like to shoot on my time for fun, I'm just not THAT concerned in my own home.

4) It isn't comfortable, it smells of paranoia, and I'm not that worried about what will happen if I put the guns away while I shower, eat, watch tv with the wife, etc.

Why NOT?? Yes,...I feel safe at home because I make it that way, along with smoke detectors, fire extinguishers, and first aid kits.

Understood... This is the Col Grossman argument for armed security in schools too.

However, I also don't carry my fire extinguisher around in my pocket, and don't keep SCBA equipment at the ready in case I have to army crawl from my home in the cover of a smoke screen.

Again, I understand guns in the home for defense... I'm just not totally on-board with the idea that I need to holster and carry my weapon on my person in my own home!


As always, to each their own :)

ArmedBear
May 1, 2008, 03:21 PM
Why?

To practice gun-spinning!

Seriously, I DO keep all my guns locked up. That way I'm not providing a weapon to an intruder so he can use it on me.

I have and early-warning system consisting of two loud indoor dogs and the way my place is configured, there are not many ways for someone to break in.

So I have time to grab a gun from a safe that opens with a keypad. Due to storage space and other considerations, there are guns upstairs and downstairs, they're locked up. Partly by coincidence, and partly by design, they are rapidly accessible.

The only time I holster at home is when I'm trying out a holster to see how I like it.

mustachio
May 1, 2008, 03:23 PM
Or as I read on this or one other forum, when asked, "why do you carry a gun?" (in your home or elsewhere).

Answer: "because I can't fit a cop in my pocket."

We all know that basically you call a cop after a crime has been committed and that they are not there to protect 'you'. So why not be prepared. Is that paranoia, I don't think so.

AlaskaErik
May 1, 2008, 03:32 PM
If someone is breaking into my home, I have no doubt that I can make it to a weapon before they enter.


Okay, you're sitting on the throne. At the very least, you'll have to pull up your pants. Still think you can make it to a gun before a BG enters? Not unless you have one stashed in the bathroom.

It isn't comfortable, it smells of paranoia, and I'm not that worried about what will happen if I put the guns away while I shower, eat, watch tv with the wife, etc.


It isn't paranoia, it's just easier to keep wearing a pistol after you get home. And don't expect the BG to move on to the next house just because you're snuggled up with the wife watch American Idol and your firearm is in the bedroom or locked up in a safe.

csmkersh
May 1, 2008, 03:36 PM
If I'm up and dressed, I'm carrying. If I'm up and wearing PJs, there's a handgun within reach without getting up - always.

If I'm not up, there's still and handgun within reach.

Trisha
May 1, 2008, 03:37 PM
If one is wise, lessons are learned from survivors - and from the dead; one is calmly proactive, having all the information necessary to forever resolve the issue and commence training.

If one is lucky, one survives and chooses according to their education, peers, and maturity. Or not.

If one is naive because of inexperience and resolves to make their own way, regardless of anything else, one may not chose wisely and remain inexperienced nonetheless.

Those who try and teach understand all too well, that you can drag a young burro to water and the creature will refuse to drink. Or, it becomes yet another incident of "In one end and out the other."

YMMV

Im283
May 1, 2008, 03:43 PM
Dust bunnies.

what caliber for dust bunnies?

I wear my gun at home because I look sexy with it.

And One cannot pick the time for a home invasion. Someone invades my home they will get shot.

I do feel extremely safe in my home. I also do not expect my house to ever catch fire. I have a fire extinguisher mounted on the wall too.

ArmedBear
May 1, 2008, 03:45 PM
Still think you can make it to a gun before a BG enters?

I sure can.

Depends on your place. There are places where I'd want a holstered gun. OTOH I'd avoid living in most of them.:)

brighamr
May 1, 2008, 03:48 PM
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. I'm not being critical here, it's certainly your right to do so. But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?

First - I never claim to do anything, I either do it or I don't.

As to your question, I live in the boonies. I have a gun on 98% of the time, due to unforseen circumstances that can happen out here (example: if one of my horses or goats breaks a leg, I want to put it down as quickly as possible. Second example: if while hiking over my property I come across a rattler, of which there are a ton in summer, I want to kill it as quickly as possible. third example: if I'm in my house and someone knocks on the door, I want to answer it quickly, and I make it a habit to answer the door ready for anything).

would I carry while at home if I lived in a city? probably. Actually I'd probably carry 100% of the time due to all the city problems (muggings, shootings, home invasions, etc). You might think I'm paranoid, but when someone breaks into your house and you're unarmed, I think you'll understand why most of us like to be prepared.

Regen
May 1, 2008, 03:51 PM
Because you never know when you might need to drill a hole in the wall (http://www.kctv5.com/news/15698864/detail.html)? :eek:

DoubleTapDrew
May 1, 2008, 03:51 PM
Yes for most cases a person could probably retrieve a gun that's not locked up in time if it's an obvious attack (like someone kicking in the door or busting through a window).

Do you retrieve one before answering the door every time, and tell them to hold on? That's how most home invasions start.

If you don't CCW I can see how it might be a hassle or uncomfortable to strap one on when you get home. If you do though, it's easy just to leave it on, and if it's uncomfortable you havent found the right holster.

You don't have to be in condition yellow/orange all the time or paranoid. You can't be "on" 24/7. But that's all the more reason to have one within arms reach, just in case all hell breaks loose when you are relaxing and unprepared.

ArmedBear
May 1, 2008, 03:52 PM
As to your question, I live in the boonies.

That's the place I'd be happy to live, where I'd want to carry a gun on me at home.

would I carry while at home if I lived in a city? probably. Actually I'd probably carry 100% of the time due to all the city problems (muggings, shootings, home invasions, etc).

I wouldn't live in the kind of city where these were anything but rare occurrences.

springmom
May 1, 2008, 03:54 PM
Sam, where did that essay from Finn come from? I'd love to get permission to copy it, with proper citations, in my blog.

As we've just bought a ranch up in Llano, I hope I get to meet this guy someday!


Springmom

ArmedBear
May 1, 2008, 03:54 PM
Do you retrieve one before answering the door every time, and tell them to hold on?

Unless I know who's at the door, yes.

Of course, the two loud dogs that bark their heads off whenever someone approaches the porch, and keep on barking, are an additional deterrent as well as an excellent alarm system.

Regen
May 1, 2008, 03:56 PM
hiking over my property I come across a rattler
Last summer, I was hiking in the Shenandoah valley, when I almost stepped on a timber rattler. I was so shocked when it rattled, that I leaped backwards, away from the rattler at 16.7 mph for about 10 feet. How do I know this? Well, I had my GPS with me in high resolution tracking mode and it recorded my retreat. :D

Maybe had I had a revolver loaded with snake shot, I'd not have jumped like that, but I bet I still would have. :uhoh:

ArmedBear
May 1, 2008, 03:59 PM
Well, I had my GPS with me in high resolution tracking mode and it recorded my retreat.

LOL

Gotta go read the Garmin manual... Is that WAAS or something else?

stevereno1
May 1, 2008, 04:00 PM
I feel "safer" when I wear my pistol at home or while out of it. If you read the newspapers daily, you will see stories of armed intruders happening every day, in all 50 states. I would prefer my story to end with me and my family safe.

rugerman07
May 1, 2008, 04:07 PM
Thanks for all the replies, lots of good, reasonable reasons for carrying at home, I just never looked at it that way.

jakemccoy
May 1, 2008, 04:10 PM
ForeignDude wrote,
Carry at home is the only method that ensures the following two conditions:

(1) Weapon is fully ready, and within immediate reach, in the event of a home invasion;
(2) Weapon cannot be accessed by children in the home without your explicit knowledge/consent.


That sums it up.

Also, I'm a gun guy. I'd lose all credibility will all my friends and would feel like a jackass if I got overtaken by an attack that could have been prevented with a simple handgun. I'd have to grunt, "Uh, my gun was in my safe," as I lay half-conscious in a hospital bed. That would make me the punchline of a joke. Anytime I ever started talking about guns for protection in the future, people would be straining not to roll their eyes at me.

bowl443
May 1, 2008, 04:21 PM
When I'm at home, 90% of my time is spent either on the living room sofa or in the kitchen, or in bed. Because of the way our home is laid out, I am never more than 4-5 steps away from a loaded firearm. The 90 lb Doberman we own will buy me time to take those 4-5 steps, I'm pretty sure.

That's good enough for me, I don't feel the need to tote iron around 24/7 just because of if/when/maybe. Yes, home invasions happen, but they most often happen to the unwary.

+1

Sounds like me if you substitue the Doberman for an Akita

jakemccoy
May 1, 2008, 04:25 PM
springmom wrote,
I work from my home. I am the only woman at home in the neighborhood during the day. One of our neighbors (a guy) also works from home. He carries too.

During the daylight hours, a suburban neighborhood is a prime target for burglary. It isn't even all that unlikely a scenario. I don't have to remember where I put the gun; I don't have to worry that guns I have stashed in different rooms will be picked up by the burglars.

I carry for the same reason I wear my seatbelts every time I drive...for that unlikely event, just in case.

Springmom

right on!

csmkersh
May 1, 2008, 04:27 PM
Sam, where did that essay from Finn come from? I'd love to get permission to copy it, with proper citations, in my blog.

As we've just bought a ranch up in Llano, I hope I get to meet this guy someday!


It came from the Texas State Rifle Association's web site (http://www.tsra.com/?p=page&id=1). Contact Jim Dark, their executive director and he may be able to help you. Until then, you could link to it with this URL http://www.tsra.com/?p=page&id=96

Finn passed away about 5 years back. One heck of a man. A PWH in Africa until things got too wild, then moved to Texas.

Wetawd
May 1, 2008, 04:30 PM
I feel safe at home but I feel even safer with my protection. Problems happen and you can't push pause run to the other side of the house grab a gun then run back and push play. When bad things happen I want my protection close.

misterwhipple
May 1, 2008, 04:59 PM
I've no business feeling safe in my home if I won't take responsible steps to be safe.

jrfoxx
May 1, 2008, 06:28 PM
Your home is where your family resides and contains your valuable possesions. Incidents of home invasions occur everyday. Why not be armed when you are protecting what you value most? Yes, there are locked doors and windows seperating you and the criminals, but these are easily defeated. The time you need a gun may be the time its sitting in a safe or drawer and you can't get to it in time.


Cant be said any better than that,IMHO. Good job Pilot.

dralarms
May 1, 2008, 06:44 PM
I carry at home, biggest reason is once it's on my hip it stays there until I am done for the evening so it stays.

Bruce333
May 1, 2008, 07:16 PM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?because carrying it around in my hand would be inconvenient.

TallPine
May 1, 2008, 07:43 PM
Also, a rifle is too awkward to carry around the house all day ;)


I live on 40 acres out in the country. Sheriff deputies are a long way away, there are large predators in the area, and occasionally two-legged bad folks. Since I carry in the house, then it is always on my hip when I step outside for something. Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

Geno
May 1, 2008, 07:50 PM
The following website "Family Watchdog (dot) us" shows only the registered sex offenders. It doesn't depict those not registered, nor other criminals elements. Do a search of your zip code and see how far away the closest sex offender is to your family. In a 1 mile span of our home, there are about 86 registered.

This link shows the numbers per state:

http://familywatchdog.us/OffenderCountByState.asp

Linnk to homepage:

http://familywatchdog.us/

sixgunner455
May 1, 2008, 07:51 PM
But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?


Why should I feel unsafe? I have a gun!

Yeah, that's a bit tongue-in-cheek, but the fact remains -- if you are prepared, you do not need to fear.

PocoDiablo
May 1, 2008, 08:15 PM
Okay, you're sitting on the throne. At the very leat, you'll have to pull up your pants. Still think you can make it to a gun before a BG enters? Not unless you have one stashed in the bathroom.
I'm not sure where I saw this, but within the past 1-2 months this very event occurred. Some guy was home, on the toilet, when he heard someone break in. He pulled up his pants, grabbed his 12ga, and walked over to the door of his bedroom. He was immediately shot in the arm/shoulder by the BG, who then retreated. The vic then picked up his 12ga with his other hand and fired a shot - and missed - leaving a large number of holes in the wall from the 00 shot.

He survived with injuries and is expected to recover as I recall.

Just another instance of how being somewhat prepared probably changed the outcome - the BG didn't bother sticking around to see what would happen after he found out the occupant was armed and not helpless.

solareclipse
May 1, 2008, 08:18 PM
Well, why not carry? Certainly you can do whatever you want at home.

But form a logical standpoint, what is home? A condo, a farm, a ranch, a house? I dont know about most people but just going to your mailbox might warrant taking precaucion.

Feeling safe is a pitfall. After getting robbed twice this year in the matter of 3 weeks, safe is just a term that doesn't belong. I wouldn't call anyone paranoid for wanting to carry around, especially if you are far away from reach of a backup piece that you have stashed wherever.

Personally i dont carry (despite it all) but my paranoid level has been raised significantly. If anyone has ever actually lived through a home invasion or attempt, i can honestly say i can imagine how they feel and wouldnt blame them for taking a shower with a piece........

Cave Dweller
May 2, 2008, 02:34 AM
Is "I'm a mall ninja" a good answerer?:neener:

Really, it's the only safe way of keeping a loaded firearm not locked up.
Sure there's a loaded shotgun in the closet, but it has a lock on it.
In my house, any gun not in my immediate control or possession is locked up. Unless it's yours, is in your possession, and like/trust you:evil:

Nematocyst
May 2, 2008, 03:23 AM
It's interesting to see 4 pages accumulate on a topic in less than 36 hrs.
We must have some strong feelings about this issue. :scrutiny:

I've been carrying "at home" (I live in my professional studio) for two years, including when clients are around.

For me, it started mainly because my studio is in a ... um, how you say ? ... sketchy part of town.
It's nearly deserted out here after 5 pm when the 9 - 5 crowd goes home.
I work late hours (note the time stamp; bed time is 2 hours away yet);
there are transients sleeping on the street (actually in sandlots just off the street) nearby.

I'll admit that a chance of break-in is small, but so is the probability of
lightning strike, snake bite, plane crash, auto accident and other "low probability" events.
Yet, as a mountaineer, I've always erred on the side of being prepared for anything at anytime.

As a side benefit, carrying at home - every day and night - adds to my comfort level with the piece.
It's part of me. I get up, I put it on. Like my pocket knife and shoes, it's part of my daily gear.

Hopefully, I'll never need it. But a 14 oz gun isn't even noticeable on my belt.
I sometimes forget it's there, yet it comforts me in intuition.

I'd rather suffer the extra 1 minute of holstering, minor inconvenience
when taking care of bathroom duties, etc and have it if ever needed
than not have it in case lightning strikes in the form of a meth-crazed transient.

Peace of mind.

Urbana John
May 2, 2008, 03:52 AM
Why carry a holstered gun at home??

Cause the string around my neck was causing a rash!!!!

UJ

Leitmotif
May 2, 2008, 05:23 AM
I live in South Africa. Home invasion is almost a national sport here.

Nematocyst
May 2, 2008, 05:29 AM
Home invasion is almost a national sport here.Inner city Detroit, you say?

Central LA?

Jersey?

(note the time stamp;
bed time is 2 hours away yet)Bed tiempo.

.38 spl near the pillow ... :scrutiny:

distra
May 2, 2008, 07:08 AM
In the last year here are a few examples why, Cheshire CT, home invasion = 3 dead, New Britain CT home invasion = 2 shot, 1 dead, numerous home invasion throughout the country side. Reason enough for me to protect my family since LE is several minutes away at best.

Sato Ord
May 2, 2008, 08:21 AM
Why not? It's my house, and my property.

Years ago I was reading about the Mau Mau Uprising. I was reading about one land owner who had successfully defended himself and his family with his pistol once. He kept the pistol in a drawer of a small desk that was set between the two sets of French doors leading to the veranda. Guess which doors the Mau Mau warriors came through when they broke into the guy's house the second time.

A firearm doesn't do you any good if the BG ends up between you and it.

Regen
May 2, 2008, 08:51 AM
ArmedBear -

Yes, I had WAAS enable and the tracking mode set to sample at the highest rate. You can set the tracking mode to record a point every X seconds or every Y feet. I forget what I had it set to.

Pilot
May 2, 2008, 09:03 AM
Cant be said any better than that,IMHO. Good job Pilot.


Thanks Buddy!

bogie
May 2, 2008, 09:19 AM
-14

Heh, heh...

Griff
May 2, 2008, 10:36 PM
We usually keep ours around the house in small safes, but pocket them when new and untrusted contractors show up to do some work. Balance between prepared and scared, I guess.

Working out in the "yard" is a different story, though. We've have some unfriendly and/or edible critters stop by, so like to be able to reach out and touch them right away.

Deputy25
May 2, 2008, 11:44 PM
It's in a holster because I have a tough time eating with it in my hand.

gym
May 3, 2008, 12:03 AM
Ok other than me, has anyone actually had a home invasion. Mine happened in 1978, in queens NY. I had a gun in a holster and couldn't pull it because I had turned the doornob to leave with my "live in" girlfriend, and the door got pushed in my face with 5 masked armed men folowing in a matter of a second. They had been in the stairwell for 45 minutes waiting for that knob to click. While on the floor, with the adrennillen flowing, I saw everything in slow motion, I saw 4 or 5 men with ski masks, two of whom had pulled my girl into a bathroom, I know I saw 3 guns minimal, the first guy had a small gun, at the time I saw a derringer, 2nd guy had a sawed off pump, third had a wheel gun. This was within a second as I went down. I could go on with this as I have had occasion to tell and reflect on it since that time many hundreds of times. Here is what I decided real fast, 7 people in a small 1 bedroom Highrise luxuory building with attended garage, and fulltime doorman, they were on the 15th floor, I could have pulled my "dective special", and definatelly dropped two of them, as I am and always was very controlled under preassure, I went to work that day, after we survived this tragedy, I wouldn't give them the satisfaction of giving in to terror. Lets go back to the floor, I didn't know what or exactlly where the other 1 or 2 guys were, they could have cut through the hall, I heard the boss say: do what your told or she's dead. I had them there for 45 minutes, at which time my business was calling me every 2 minutes, and 4 of my guys were on the way, they knew something was up. We survived it, and the girl was a standup girl, her brother was a Fed, i found out about 6 months later, thru my people, that they were very bad people, I interviewed another guy who had been hit by the same crew, they lit his house on fire on the way out. It's always almost someone you know. So for you guys carrying your guns at home, god bless, but it happens so fast, that it's hard to defend against with multiple things and perps running thru your home. Since that day, I always have had a very good alarm system, so that if someone takes you out at the door, you have to shut off the code, in doing so you can set off your "panic" silent alarm, I have two Big dogs, who hear people a block away from my home, and I have a gun within 1 step of wherever I am. I don't ware a gun at home, I have grandkids now, everywhere else you bet. But the reason that I put this up is twofold, never tell a friend or a girl you go out with,
"your business", I didn't, they never got my payroll, it had been done 3 days earlier, it was Christmass bonus time also, they missed those also, I had my accountant take are of them prior to that day.And the best judge of what is happening to you is you. Just as far as me, I figure I got lucky, I never panicked, my girl stood the test, she was more worried about the beating I was taking, for not having the cash, But I can only tell you that I didn't know at the time two of this crew had shot and killed a couple folks before. And be aware that when they say, "kill this guy, he's nuts, or he don't have the cash", you will wish you would have taken the shot. But it was an intimtdation thing. They got maybe a few thousand dollars in pocket cash, and a gun, along with some jewelry.

Ben Shepherd
May 3, 2008, 07:37 PM
Home is where the majority of things I place value on are. Be a little nuts to not consider it worth protection.

Here's a little situation for you:

Bachelor friend of mine had just come home from shooting. Field stripped his pistol on the coffee table so he could start cleaning it. Nature called. Where he's batching it, no reason to close doors. So as he sits there within sight of his stripped pistol with his pants around the ankles, his door gets kicked in.

Yup, the old home invasion/robbery. He wasn't hurt luckily, but they took a bunch of his stuff, including the stripped pistol.

So-
I carry all the time.

Zach S
May 3, 2008, 09:34 PM
What I value most is normally with me in public, so I carry to protect them and myself if need be.

What I value most is noramlly at home with me too, so I carry to protect them and myself if need be.

Besides, my carry gun is as much a part of my daily attire as my belt. It goes on when I get dressed, and comes off when I get undressed. To me, removing my carry gun just because I'm home, and putting it on before I go out makes as much sense as treating my pants the same way.

Geno
May 3, 2008, 09:42 PM
Just did an updated search on the Family Watchdog site. Lucky us. We now have 125 mappable sex offenders in our area, and 14 that are not mappable. By the way, the site provides photographs. Search results:

125 Offenders
14 Non-Mappable Offenders

Some people probably wonder why I keep a "hawkeye" on my area, and especially while my child is outside. I know what autos every neighbor drives, and most visitors' cars. I "know" who frequents my street. As I see it, better safe than sorry. Carrying 24/7 is no different. If I had to run to get my firearm before I could act to protect myself or my family, I fear it would more likely be sorry.

I choose to be safe, 24/7.

Sans Authoritas
May 3, 2008, 10:15 PM
Poco Diablo, I had almost the exact same raccoon scenario as you encountered. In broad daylight, the raccoon had come within 5 feet of the insanely barking, tethered dog, and both appeared quite willing to get in a tangle. Thankfully, I was armed, and I drew, though thankfully I did not need to fire a shot. I was able to pull the dog away with no contact. I'm sorry to hear that your encounter was worse.

-Sans Authoritas

1911Tuner
May 4, 2008, 12:04 AM
Just last week, we had a double homicide over in Winston-Salem. Two miscreants...a BF/GF team...entered an old man's home while he waited for his lunch from the Meals on Wheels volunteers.

The volunteers...an older Husband/Wife team...walked in on the robbery and assault in progress.

The old gentleman was already dead or dying from blunt force head trauma. The man-child and apparent brains of the invasion team shot both of them...killing her and badly wounding her husband. They had a 4 week-old baby in the car, and ran into Virginia where they staged a standoff with police for several hours...with the baby still on board.

This happened in a "nicer" section of Winston...in broad daylight...and the house was within 30 feet of a business thoroughfare.

Home isn't the safe haven that it appears to be. Yes. I carry at home.

Feanaro
May 4, 2008, 12:15 AM
You'll find out when you think you need it and it ain't there. At least, I hope you only think you need it.

Rumble
May 4, 2008, 12:17 AM
Frankly, I don't feel the least bit worried in my home. The prosaic reality is that it's usually easier than disarming and then putting it back on when I go out again. And, what's more, if I do need it - it's there.

Nematocyst
May 4, 2008, 02:53 AM
Home isn't the safe haven that it appears to be. Yes. I carry at home.Bears repeating.

Read it over and over again until you get it.

This ain't the 1960's when unlocked doors were the "friendly neighborhood" way of doing things.
"Home" is no longer safe. Those who lived in medieval castles understood that the castle had to be defended.
We have become complacent about that "defense" thing, thinking that all is well.

This is a time of mortgage crisis, increasing unemployment, dwindling oil, cultural melt down, and other dissolution.

To those of you in the heartland who scoff at what's happening on the coasts: don't get smug.
Smug is what the miscreants want you to be so that they can get into your home more easily.

How close is your handgun?

http://members.tripod.com/~MIDEVIL8u/palelric.gif

riceboy72
May 4, 2008, 07:20 AM
I agree with all of the other answers, but would like to add that carrying at home builds confidence in the gear you will carry on the street. For example, I have a new holster for my Kimber and I am breaking it in at home where I can adjust it with out everyone knowing I am carrying.

Very valid point, shooter45.

I have, over the past year and a half, started carrying inside my residence as a part of my daily routine (although I've carried concealed for just over fourteen years now). For me, it's part of being prepared for whatever may come my way. Because I'm in my residence behind a locked door doesn't guarantee I'm safe and harm won't find its way to me. Granted, carrying at home doesn't guarantee that either, but it gives me the better hand should malice happen to make an unplanned visit one day.

Last fall, I got a phone call as I was getting ready for work from a close friend who's a Deputy. She said the bank two blocks east of me was robbed at gunpoint, and the suspect had run off to the west. My neighborhood is the first one in line with the bank, so every possibility of him coming through the area existed. I live in the second most populated and crime affected counties in Washington, and I know about the bad things that happen daily because of what I do. It's not fun to think about and it's sad that it's gone the way that it has, but it is what it is.

On a closing note, I spent some time at my dad's house tonight. He's in his mid 60's and I've convinced him to carry his pocket pistol and his Surefire with him at night when he takes his dogs out. This is the same house I grew up in, but it's a different world and I'm glad to see he's willing to take that step to make sure he and my mom stay safe. While I don't think I can get him to carry around the house, I at least have him carrying while he's outside - something I'd never even thought about growing up in my community. Times have changed; so must I.

cambeul41
May 4, 2008, 07:35 AM
Do you feel unsafe at home?

Not at all. I even sleep there.

I have greatly enjoyed all of the excellent answers that have been given

1911Tuner
May 4, 2008, 08:18 AM
I guess the main issue is that recently...many home invaders have switched strategies and tactics...from relying on stealth to obtain their objectives to using terror to force compliance. They enter with full knowledge that the occupants are at home...or kick in the door, as required.

So, the old image of the quintessential cat burglar with a Lone Ranger mask, flashlight, and loot bag has pretty much given over to storming the gates in a lightning strike assault...very often with violence, injury and death as a result of the feeding frenzy.

Some will catch a resident involved in yardwork, and approach on some pretense of car trouble or for directions...force them inside...and have at them hidden from public view.

Yes. It's a much, much different world. We accommodate, or we risk losing badly.

Fred Fuller
May 4, 2008, 08:22 AM
I carry concealed at home because I have not yet learned how to schedule my emergencies. I may be working anywhere on our several acres of rural property, I may be five minutes by car away in the small town nearby. I might encounter a rabid animal, in fact that's probably more likely than having trouble with a human varmint. There's no telling what might happen out here, or where or when.

It's just easier for me to carry from pants on to pants off. YMMV of course, in that event I hope time does not prove you wrong.

lpl/nc

csmkersh
May 4, 2008, 10:30 AM
I carry concealed at home because I have not yet learned how to schedule my emergencies.

Too true.

TallPine
May 4, 2008, 11:59 AM
The closest I have ever come to pulling a gun on another human being was while I was standing in my dining room. My daughter had opened the door :rolleyes: ( we had a talk about that later!) and the no-good-nik refused to leave and was standing there demanding that I go help him get a pickup out of a snowdrift off of a property that he had no right to be on.

They finally left, but that was not the last time that some suspicious folks have showed up around here. They all have the same story - "just got out of the service" (even though their hair is down on their shoulders) and they are always begging for gas to get back to town after they can't get anything else out of you.

The last time somebody showed up unexpected late in the evening, I met them with a rifle in my hands. That sort of intimidated the guy which was just as well. So when I say a carry a holstered sidearm because a rifle is too hard to carry around all the time, I am not completely joking ;)

1911Tuner
May 4, 2008, 12:16 PM
TallPine...I, too have had people appear on my property out of nowhere with that little somethin' that I couldn't quite put my finger on that raised my hackles. The presence of the pistol under my shirttail was a comfort, and I think in a couple of instances...my calm demeanor and straightforward, watchful response very likely gave them reason to reconsider whatever it was they had in mind.

REB
May 4, 2008, 12:30 PM
For me it's simple, when I get up in the morning I put my gun on. when I go to bed I take it off. That way in the unlikely event I need it I have it at hand.

TallPine
May 4, 2008, 01:40 PM
TallPine...I, too have had people appear on my property out of nowhere with that little somethin' that I couldn't quite put my finger on that raised my hackles.

Well, when they come around looking for so-and-so my former neighbor - there is more than a little something to put my finger on :uhoh:

Last time, the locked gate probably saved the new owner from getting his house ransacked, but they came to my house to ask about it.

mljdeckard
May 4, 2008, 01:48 PM
I carry at home because I see repeated donning and removing of my sidearm as needless handling, which is not good for the gun, or for accountability.

All common-sense security steps should be followed at home, but you would indeed feel foolish if you carried everywhere EXCEPT home, and then were victimized while you were at home. I don't keep a rifle in every room in my house, but given the chance, I will not use the handgun at all. I will get a long gun.

mehere
May 4, 2008, 02:06 PM
If the link doesn't work, google Ayoob and the Dartmouth murders.


http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BTT/is_169_28/ai_114475580/pg_1

1911Tuner
May 4, 2008, 02:08 PM
Last time, the locked gate probably saved the new owner from getting his house ransacked, but they came to my house to ask about it.

Which brings up another point...

These cretins are starting to move further away from the city limits and the suburbs, and into the more rural, outlying areas to pursue their mischief. Country folks who revel in their privacy and the fact that the nearest neighbor is a quarter-mile away are also pretty well isolated and out of earshot when they come to call.

In my way of thinkin' a body'd have more reason to carry at home on the farm than in the inner city.

papajohn
May 4, 2008, 02:14 PM
I was at home last night after a 12-hour shift, sitting at my computer, and I heard the PD helicopter overhead. That's not uncommon, it's up and flying most nights, but especially weekends and when the weather is nice. But I heard the chopper circling (the police chopper has a very distinctive pitch, higher than the commercial and medical choppers that constantly fly over me) and as I went to the window to see what area he was focusing on, a squad car went by and lit me up with his alley lights. I already had my .45 on, so there was no need to "go git a gun". I never figured out who or what they were after, but I wasn't concerned. The shotguns and the AR-15 are loaded, a few steps away, if needed.

A week ago, I was in back of my apartment building barbecuing, and my neighbor came outside to chat. He's not a typical clueless Yuppie, but he's pretty much a gunless Liberal, and when I casually adjusted my holstered 45 under my shirt, his eyes watched me carefully. "You packing........in your own back yard? Isn't that kinda......paranoid?" I was still formulating my answer when a large SUV with $500 rims and blacked-out windows drove by, music blasting, and the lyrics we were subjected to were saying something about "Killin' Every Cracker M-F'er I see..........." I just smiled back at him and said "Why should I be paranoid, Dave? Who around here would ever think of doing us harm?"

He got the idea. The funny part is that his wife was an Olympic Air Rifle competitor in the 90's, and LOVES to shoot my handguns! At least one of them gets it. I'm sure if the SHTF they'd be at my door in seconds! :rolleyes:

PJ

Aguila Blanca
May 4, 2008, 02:16 PM
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. I'm not being critical here, it's certainly your right to do so. But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?
Considering the number of armed home invasions is on the rise, the answer to your question would have to be "Yes!"

In the most recent issue of Shooting Times magazine Jim Wilson wrote about a home invasion in which the husband was beaten and the women raped and murdered. I was certain he was referring to the incident that happened near my brother and it appeared he had some details incorrect, so I e-mailed him. He responded the next day to let me know that, while superficially they sounded like the same incident, the one he referred to was NOT the one near my brother.

About a month ago there was another one a few miles from my brother's place. Two women shot, one survived and the other was raped and her body dumped in a quarry after the perp stole her car.

We're not in Kansas any more. Where I live, if I call the police they might get here in 10 to 15 minutes -- if I'm lucky, if they aren't too far away, and if they're not already on another call. In other words, it's MY job to protect me, my wife, and our home. The bad guys aren't going to knock politely and ask permission to rape, pillage and plunder. They'll come bustin' in. That's why I wear a gun around the house.

invictus82
May 4, 2008, 02:31 PM
Here's an additional question: do you carry chambered at home?

CZ-100
May 4, 2008, 02:49 PM
Here's an additional question: do you carry chambered at home?

Is there any other way????

Not for me.

papajohn
May 4, 2008, 02:57 PM
I was taking my trash out to the dumpster in the alley behind my building last fall, when a St Louis PD cop and his partner drove by. It was well after midnight, and I guess it looked suspicious, so they slowed down and lit me up. I raised my arms and showed them empty palms, and they cut off the alley light as I walked up to them. The passenger side cop was an older guy, around my age, and he saw my vest and knew what it was for. He mentioned that it was kinda late to be roaming around in a dark alley, and I just shrugged and said I wasn't worried, if anything came up, "I'd deal with it."

He grinned and lowered his voice, and asked what I had. I peeled my vest away from my waist, exposing my Surefire G2, a large folding knife, and the butt of my Bersa. "9 Mil?" he asked, and I said, "Nope, 45." As we started to chat about my neighborhood I mentioned that I had almost been carjacked a few weeks before, about three blocks away. They asked about the details, and I mentioned that it ended when I jammed a .380 into the lead bad guy's forehead as he leaned in close. Both of them proclaimed that I shoulda shot the dude, as he had a (butter) knife in his hand.

I told them that I'd bought the 45 a week later, after deciding the .380 wasn't enough, and the older cop laughed, and agreed. Then he turned to his partner, and said, "See, Junior, Mr Boy Scout here unnerstands Life In The Big City." They bade me a pleasant night as we parted, and I remember thinking as I walked to my front door, "Sheesh, when the cops are GLAD to see an old white guy packing heat, this must be a crummy neighborhood!"

It was kinda funny and sad, all at the same time. But at least my Attack Cats are on the job.......when they're not sleeping 20 hours a day..........:eek:

Papajohn

1911Tuner
May 4, 2008, 03:03 PM
Here's an additional question: do you carry chambered at home?

Sometimes.

invictus82
May 4, 2008, 03:07 PM
My thought on it, at least for myself, is since most SD shots are single handed, and very quick every second counts. I carry a true DAO striker fired semi auto with about 7lbs on the trigger with a long DA pull, so I don't worry about having one in the chamber, so long as it is in a holster that protects the trigger guard. My only concern is I'll be wrestling around with my 18 month old daughter and the darn thing will fall out on me. Guess I should get a ccw holster with a thumb break away. Anyway, thanks everyone for your insights in this forum discussion. I've found it really interesting, and it has helped to answer some questions of my own.

Rumble
May 4, 2008, 03:21 PM
Here's an additional question: do you carry chambered at home?

Yes; when I carry the gun at home (which is not always), I carry it the same way I do any other time - it will hopefully eliminate one more possible stumbling block should it ever actually be needed.

revolverman357
May 4, 2008, 03:28 PM
In the past 20 yrs, I've been robbed at gunpoint, someone kicked in my front door at 3am, and various miscreants have showed up and been very suspicious. All this and I live in a rural generally peaceful area. These people come from the cities to the north of me and look for opportunity. Yes, I carry at home.

Treo
May 4, 2008, 03:44 PM
I just live in a weird neighborhod there are people moving through it all night long. Also we've had bears ,mountain lions & quite a few coyotes, as well as, foxes in this neighborhood (and I live in the center of town). I think I'd be a fool not to carry at home.

As for those who chose not to , your choice. I don't think any thing I would say is going to change your mind.

According to legend Billy The Kid felt safe in Ft. Sumner that's why he wasn't carrying a pistol when Pat Garret shot him in Pete Maxwell's Bedroom.

For the record has the OP participated in this discussion since he started it?

45crittergitter
May 4, 2008, 06:40 PM
Here's why:

Just last week this occurred directly across the street from a friend's house in a nice rural subdivision-type neighborhood.

http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2008805010379

TallPine
May 4, 2008, 06:49 PM
do you carry chambered at home?

Life is a lot simpler when you carry a revolver ;)

1911Tuner
May 4, 2008, 07:32 PM
Life is a lot simpler when you carry a revolver

Hey! Ain't a thing wrong with a revolver. In this day of hi-cap wondernines and picatinny rails...the ol' wheelgun will still toe the mark with the best of'em if it's shot well.

Cosmoline
May 4, 2008, 07:41 PM
I put my handgun up when I get home.

Because when I'm home I carry a RIFLE. I have no intention of giving any intruder a fair fight if I have any choice in the matter.

kermit315
May 4, 2008, 09:51 PM
well, I cant carry where I live now, I live on a Navy base. Security would probably have a hard time with it. Anywho, when I lived at home(rural Illinois), and when I was in Washington State, I lived in the country and when I owned a pistol, I kept it very close by. Saw some weird stuff at night, and you just never know what will happen. Even here on the base, I keep stuff close enough to me that I can load up quick if I need it, and deal with the military aspect of it later. Part of the whole judged by 12/carried by six thing.

packnrat
May 5, 2008, 01:58 AM
do you have insurance coving your home?

are you safe from all at home?

and having the gun on you and you have little ones..
.the gun is in very safe mode.


just a choice for safety. pistol on my hip,
shotgun behind door number one,
and rifle behind door number two.

bad guy should pick door number three,
it has steel bars.

ImARugerFan
May 5, 2008, 09:21 AM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?

Paranoia mostly.

1911Tuner
May 5, 2008, 09:28 AM
Paranoia mostly.

Which ain't entirely a bad thing. A little paranoia will help keep ya above ground...

Sato Ord
May 5, 2008, 11:00 AM
Which ain't entirely a bad thing. A little paranoia will help keep ya above ground...

In the words of Doctor Johnny Fever, "When the world is out to get ya, paranoia is just smart thinkin'."

To quote my friend Rick, "No, I'm not afraid, I'm the one with the gun!"

REB
May 5, 2008, 12:15 PM
I put my handgun up when I get home.

Because when I'm home I carry a RIFLE. I have no intention of giving any intruder a fair fight if I have any choice in the matter.


I find it much easier to carry my handgun at home and that will allow me to get to my long gun.

Hot brass
May 5, 2008, 12:34 PM
Dad told me it is better to have a gun and not need it, than to need a gun and not have it.

dalepres
May 5, 2008, 11:58 PM
The safest storage for a gun in your house is in a holster that is on a belt that is around your waist. That way you always know where the gun is. You always know your kids or grandkids are not playing with it. You can always reach it when the bad guys come in the door.

The question is not why people holster carry in their homes, the question is why doesn't everybody holster carry in their homes?

Aguila Blanca
May 6, 2008, 12:56 AM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?
Paranoia mostly.
There's an old line that goes, "Just because I'm paranoid doesn't mean they're not watching."

And just being NOT paranoid also doesn't mean they're not watching. I just read within the past week a follow-up report on the Petit home invasion in Connecticut. I don't recall reading this in any reports around the time of the incident, but it seems the two perps had been watching the Petit house for a period of several days or even weeks before they pulled off the invasion.

This all took place in a typical upper-scale suburban neighborhood. In fact, IIRC the Petit's house had an alarm system, which they did NOT use ... because "it was such a safe neighborhood." Even so, it's tough to accept that a pair of thugs could spend days or even weeks scoping out a house for an invasion and not ONE of the neighbors saw anything suspicious enough to have called the cops.

I'm sort of coming around to the mindset that a little paranoia is a good thing.

Nematocyst
May 6, 2008, 01:53 AM
There is a subtle but significant distinction between paranoia and metanoia (http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=2228970&postcount=14).

When it comes to carrying at home, I think of myself as metanoid.

Nem, at home, x42 in an OWB.

Carl N. Brown
May 7, 2008, 06:56 AM
Paranoia mostly.

I assume that comment was being humorous. :)

But to repeat myself: in the last set of 3 years that I looked at my hometown murders, of the eight murders in those three years at least FIVE were home invasion killings.

If they really are out to get you and you are not paranoid, then you are in denial.

1911Tuner
May 7, 2008, 07:37 AM
of the eight murders in those three years at least FIVE were home invasion killings.

Any info on how many of those were staged during daylight hours?

RifleGuy
May 7, 2008, 09:00 AM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. I'm not being critical here, it's certainly your right to do so. But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?
Mmm. I live in the Detroit Metro area; feel unsafe at home? Yes. I feel a bit of precaution is in order. Violent, daylight hours home invasions are on the rise, and as our local economy makes great strides towards being the worst in the US (Thanks Jenny Gandholm!!) I suspect the problem will worsen.
Our fair city already boasts one of the worst crime rates in the nation; depending upon which Federal statistics you read, arguably the worst city in the nation.
In conversation with one of Detroits finest, I asked the young officer what she did when a call came in declaring "shots fired". The young lady advised me, "I drive slow; it's all sorted out when I get there, nothing but paperwork."

Remember; when seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

Good day to you all.
-RG

RifleGuy
May 7, 2008, 09:04 AM
...of the eight murders in those three years at least FIVE were home invasion killings.
And that would be an average week in Detroit.

30 cal slob
May 7, 2008, 09:16 AM
ah, i have to confess. after ccwing all day, i want to take the durned things OFF and run around the house in my skivvies. ccw just ain't comfortable.

i've got lockboxes with pistols and ammo strategically placed around the house instead. not as good as carrying on my person, but better than nothing.

beretta92d
May 7, 2008, 09:37 AM
gun goes on as soon as i get dressed and will stay there till i go to bed..
(now maybe once in awhile i'll un-holster it while watching T.V.but it ends up right next to me.)

at bed time,it goes under the pillow..(or next to pillow on bed)

Granted,i live in a 6 apt building with locked outer doors and which is within a nice quiet area of manchester(but you never know..:scrutiny:)

mhillsing23
May 7, 2008, 10:24 AM
ah, i have to confess. after ccwing all day, i want to take the durned things OFF and run around the house in my skivvies. ccw just ain't comfortable.

Maybe you need to look for a new CCW setup. Mine is very comfortable no matter what I am doing: lounging, working, driving, hiking, etc.

beaucoup ammo
May 7, 2008, 12:26 PM
I haven't read all 147 posts, so please excuse if this is a duplication. My wife and I are in our 60's, retired, no kids in the house, a life time of possessions under the roof and I'm in a wheel chair or on crutches. To not carry around the house, IMO, would be crazy.

In addition to carrying on my person, there's a handgun in every room and in both vehicles. Again, no kids. We live in an area of San Antonio that's seen the crime rate go up steadily over the past 10 years. Home invasions, the sound of police helicopters and robberies of businesses in the area aren't uncommon.

That's why I carry a holstered gun at home. Not to mention I'd never be able to live with myself if anything happened to my wife, home or me for lack of a weapon at the ready.

docmagnum357
May 7, 2008, 10:31 PM
As I sit at the computer, wearing my shorts that I sleep in, my Smith and Wesson modewl 19 sits on the computer desk. If I am gardening, or working around the house, or mowing the grass, I carry a GLOCK 23, or a S&W model 629 or The trusty,rusty model 19. When I am working, the 19 or the 629. At church, the 19 or the GLOCK. If I am awake, I have a gun on me, and It is never a " mouse gun". I don't worry about the power factor so much, as long as it makes "major", but I do worry about handling qualities, and the accuracy. My neighbor knows that I carry, and a few very close freinds. I teach concealed carry classes, so more and more people know. I personally just don't feel comfortable without a major power handgun within arms reach. As one person posted above, it is almost a duty to resist evil. The the Bible tells us to resist evil, and it will flee. I would hate to think that the carjacker or home invader that I don't shoot ( I am six feet tall, and weigh 295 lbs. I am a stonemason by trade. No one in their right mind would attack me unarmed.) might meet one of my older neighbors, or some of our wives or children. There really are goblins out there. Always have been, always will be.
I tell all my students that the safest place for a handgun is holstered, and on your hip, for the reasons that are mentioned above. Out of reach of children, always there when you need it, always in your control. I would like to see carry laws relaxed so that I can carry anywhere, with the exception of places that screen everyone (metal detectors) and allow you to check your guns, no questions asked. My handgun is a lot more dangerous in the seat, or under the seat of my car in the parking lot of a school, bank, or post office than it is in a holster on my side. It is more likely to be stolen in the vehicle.

Ben Shepherd
May 7, 2008, 11:34 PM
One more post from me on this:

In the last year my neighborhood has changed, and not for the better. The house across the street that was built when my town was founded, and the family that built it had lived there for generations? Yeah, they moved out.

The folks that moved in? Both parents have been arrested for drug offenses, and the home is now in foreclosure.

The home over my east fence? Bought by a developer. He's going to put homes in the vacant inner block. This is a good thing.

The bad? In the mean time, he rented the house to the state. They put a lady in there who is trying to get clean so she can get her kids back. She's been hauled off in cuffs three times in the last month. Her live in boyfriend? He got hauled for public intoxication last week.

So I finished my fence, put up no trespassing signs, and now have motion sensing lights covering my property 360 degrees.

With this in mind(and the fact we had over 40 vehicle burglaries in just over a week) leads me to believe I'd be foolish not to live the boy scout motto.

B yond
May 8, 2008, 12:58 AM
But, I have to ask why?

In case I have to shoot someone.

hoosier8
June 5, 2008, 08:56 AM
Just in case my cats decide to revolt.

WayneConrad
June 5, 2008, 08:58 AM
If it's not holstered, it keeps falling out of my underwear.

PocoDiablo
June 5, 2008, 11:23 AM
Funny thing happened the other night - around 3:00 am the wife tells me someone is out by the cars with a flashlight, so I walk out to the living room window and look out. Much to my surprise I come face to face with some guy on a mountain bike who is clearly on his way to look in the house to see what he can score.

I think the sight of me with a gun in holster helped remind him that he should go home and go to bed.

Ske1etor
June 5, 2008, 11:39 AM
It is the best place for it when it is loaded. I wouldn't want to lock it up because I cannot get to it in time if needed and I wouldn't want to leave it on the coffee table unattended. Seems like the logical place to keep it. It is ready to be used, therefore keeping me and my family safe from anything that may arise and is in a safe place, keeping me and my family safe from an accidental or negligent discharge.

Thumper_6119
June 5, 2008, 11:44 AM
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. I'm not being critical here, it's certainly your right to do so. But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?

I used to work in the psych ward of a maximum security prison, so in the event that one of the inmates that used to be under my "supervision" paroles or discharges and decides to come a knockin', I will be decently prepared. (And believe me, I've seen some of the most horrible things that people are capable of. Also, remember that these inmates weren't born in prison. They victimized someone in the freeworld to get there). Also, eventhough I live in a "decent" neighborhood, just one block over last summer a resident had a forced home invasion where 2 men kicked in the front door of the home and robbed the family at gunpoint (and they were lucky that robbing was all that happened). You're not truly "safe" anywhere. But that's just me. I'm one of those "the price of peace is eternal vigilence" kind of guys.

Awesome topic, by the way!

3KillerBs
June 5, 2008, 11:53 AM
I'm not doing it yet because I'm still gun shopping, but I will be. There is no other way to have a loaded gun immediately available in case of a home invasion without risking my young children getting their hands on it.

My 2yo is perfectly capable of firing a cowboy revolver styled cap pistol with a trigger that is significantly heavier than the trigger on my Mark III -- and he knows how to cock it for single action too.

Byron Quick
June 5, 2008, 12:10 PM
If I only carried when I 'felt unsafe' that would mean that I was turning carrying a weapon into a dice toss.

I carry all the time. I keep a firearm in arm's reach 24/7 except when I'm forced to go into a safety zone for criminals.

There's a firearm in arm's reach when I'm sleeping.

It's not a matter of 'feeling safe' or 'feeling unsafe.' Painful experience has shown that sometimes when I 'feel safe,' I'm not safe and that when I 'feel unsafe,' I'm not. Therefore, I carry all the time. That way, it doesn't matter if my feelings are accurate or inaccurate.

SamG.
June 5, 2008, 01:27 PM
It's not that i'm paranoid or anything, I just have to have a gun on me, or near me 24/7. Heck! i've got my AK in my arms right now! I would hate to ever be caught off gaurd in my own house.

Robby
June 5, 2008, 03:06 PM
I just had an incident this morning, that gave me a reminder to strap it on when I put my pants on!
Every morning, when my wife goes to work, I let her out the front gate! Then I return to the house, or to the barn to let the horses out!
This morning, for some stupid reason, I did not slip a gun in my pants pocket. Just about a minute after the wife left the phone started ringing, but I could not get to it before it stopped. (I was walking up the driveway to barn, about 400 feet long).

I got to the barn checked the caller ID, it was the wife! I just continued to put the horses out. She calls back, and says there were two very weird acting guys walking down our road toward our house as she went to work. I look out and can see at least one of them, walking and I HAVE NO GUN!! It is a couple hundred feet to the house.

To say the least, I hot footed it to the house, checked for the JUDGE, which was setting loaded on the kitchen table, picked up my 905 and paddle holster, and went to the front door of my house!!

I look out and see where these guys were. Well I only see one of them, but he is walking angrily past my house, and as he gets to my mail box (which is a hardened steel type) he hauls off and punches the mail box. Then spent a little time rubbing his fist.

No I did not open the door and yell at him for trying to break his fist on my mail box. But I did call the Sheriff's non emergency #, and report him with description, as there are numerous houses close to the road where he was headed, and he was up to NO GOOD!

I am happy to say, two sheriffs cars shortly went down the road looking for these guys.

You know I am kicking myself, for being unprotected this morning. and not even having my cell phone. They could have been close to my gate when I let the wife out, giving me a problem!! They could have jumped my fence entering my property, where I could not observe them, giving me a problem.

The whole theme of this post, is like others!

YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN YOU MIGHT NEED IT!!

I did not, but could have from the one who had some anger issues already.

I AM KICKING MYSELF FOR BREAKING MY OWN GUIDELINES FOR HERE ON THE FARM!!!

I also am getting concerned that after almost 10 weeks, KSP has not sent me my CC paperwork.

Havegunjoe
June 5, 2008, 03:38 PM
First without a holster my gun is likely to fall down the leg of my pants and might shoot me in the foot. Second, have you ever heard of “Home Invasions”? I have and they never seem to be pre-announced so you have time to run and get to your gun. I’m not expecting one but neither were any of the people that experienced them first hand from what I can tell. Third it harms no one so why not?

da3394
June 5, 2008, 08:13 PM
I live about six miles out of town in a very rural area and my house is about 1/4 to 1/2 mile off the road. If I called 911 and a sherrif's deputy were sitting on the road by my mailbox he would not be able to get here in time to protect my family or me. He would be here in time to take a report and put the yellow tape around the area. It is legal to carry open or concealed on my own property and if an invader wants to come in my house, he will come at his own risk.

Zedicus
June 5, 2008, 09:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSKZ8smNuZk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iu26SklizD4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqK-t026lRs (Armed Resident "2" 6 Armed Crooks "0")
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnH2dWh_BoQ (Armed Homeowner "1" Crook "0")
http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/i_video/main500251.shtml?id=3095650n
News Article with a lot more detail (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/25/national/main3095614.shtml)

Need I say More?

Elza
June 5, 2008, 10:29 PM
About two weeks ago some clown started ringing our doorbell at 1:00 AM. He was looking for “Susan” but he didn’t know the address and his cell phone was dead so he just started “looking for her house”. Riiiight!! About this time he spotted the P90 in my hand. His eyes got as big as saucers, he started to stutter and stammer, and promptly beat a hasty retreat from our property.

Was he just a total idiot or did he have other ideas? I don’t know and he didn’t stick around long enough to enlighten me.

dhoomonyou
June 6, 2008, 11:14 AM
In case the cats get rowdy.

Rey B
June 6, 2008, 11:38 PM
Things like this happen all the time. http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080605/NEWS01/806050530/1008/NEWS01 :eek:

coloradokevin
June 6, 2008, 11:50 PM
I guess the need may even vary a bit from person to person.

I've read through many of the responses here, and I can see some good points:

1) Live in a rural area, and might be out on the land... no help nearby

2) Live in a high-crime area, or densely populated place where crime is likely.

... and, other good examples.


For me though, I still stand by the fact that I can't be "on" at all times. My doors are locked to my house. There is a gun on my nightstand, and it is a ten foot walk from where I am sitting, and a 20 foot walk from the closest door. I have a gun in other places too, and can very likely get to any of them before an intruder could get to me. My wife is also a shooter, and can get to something if I can't. Oh, and we have a 75lb German Shepherd/Akita mix (she's pretty friendly, but can be intimidating when she's barking in the backyard).

Honestly, you can always be more prepared. Preparedness is often measured after the fact. If someone gets a jump on you and you had a gun on you, some would say that you should have been able to get to your gun more quickly. If someone breaks in your house and you don't have a gun, most would say that you should have!

But, I guess I'm not prepared (or is it paranoid?) enough to carry inside of my house in my low-crime suburban neighborhood. Examples of things going wrong in any area exist, but it isn't worth the trouble to me when I'm relaxing in my sweats at home!

Plus, it isn't like I'm helpless without a gun. A firearm is only one layer of defense. Awareness, security, and hand-to-hand tactics (among other things) should not be completely disregarded.

86thecat
June 7, 2008, 01:20 AM
I have carried long enough to feel lopsided without it.

If people feel secure in their homes they've never kicked in a door or busted out a window.

JohnnyOrygun
June 7, 2008, 03:10 AM
Moooose102 brings up a point that rings true with me too. I have severe arthritis in my knees and both of my hips are bone on bone. So I can't really fight off an intruder and I can't run to my bedroom to get my gun. So I keep it with me. Besides the Boy Scout Motto is "Be prepared"

And as was so very well pointed out, if my gun is with me, my kids aren't going to get in trouble. Even though they have been instructed in the 4 basics of gun handling and threatened with "Corporal punishment" if they ever handle one of my guns without me being present. They are still kids and I can remember (barely) what it was like to be a kid and like guns at a young age.... tempting veryyy tempting. But I also knew my Dad would tan my hide end if I handled his guns without him being present.

Treo
June 8, 2008, 12:27 AM
In the last 24 hrs here in Colorado Springs there have been 2 homicides, one armed robbery , a stabbing & 1 home inasion. As recently as the last 2 weeks there have been 4 home invasions , 2 rapes and 3 shootings. With in the last month 3 other sexuall assaults 2 or 3 other shootings & I think 3 other home invasions ( they're actually becoming so common they no longer make the 10 O' Clock news).

Tonight a spokesperson for CSPD stated in an interview that CSPD has niether the manpower, nor the money to effectively police the city.

I would say that given that information the responsability for my safety rests squarely on MY shoulders.

koja48
June 8, 2008, 02:00 AM
Why? Because I refuse to be a helpless victim & I don't believe my home is somehow off-limits to dirt bags or is a safety zone. I reckon I'm just a firm believer in the old adage that says "Home is where the hardware is . . . "

Stevie-Ray
June 8, 2008, 02:15 AM
Always have at least my P32 in my back pocket. USPC is on the side of the bed at night. Safe is open behind me right now. Anybody think I'm paranoid? TS, I don't really care.

Rokyudai
June 8, 2008, 12:04 PM
I carry a spare tire in my car. Does that make me paranoid of a flat? It's just a contingency plan that I hope to avoid using. In either case, it's not like I hope to use either anytime soon.

RX-178
June 8, 2008, 12:42 PM
To be honest, there's no philosophical reason behind why I carry in the home.

I put the holster on when I get dressed in the morning. I'm too lazy to take it off again until I'm going to bed. That's about it.

texas_rebel_1980
June 8, 2008, 12:56 PM
Carry at home is the only method that ensures the following two conditions:

(1) Weapon is fully ready, and within immediate reach, in the event of a home invasion;
(2) Weapon cannot be accessed by children in the home without your explicit knowledge/consent.

that and it is annoying to arm and disarm everytime i come and go. and i never know when i will need to pistol whip one of my kids to get them back in line.............................:what: JK

TallPine
June 8, 2008, 01:11 PM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?

Certain creeps will just not give it up and leave us and our new neighbor alone :(

Gate's locked again, and I have been advised that so-and-so is not welcome.

PTK
June 8, 2008, 01:23 PM
Same reason I carry outside my home, too. "Just in case".

Werewolf
June 8, 2008, 06:58 PM
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. I'm not being critical here, it's certainly your right to do so. But, I have to ask why? Do you feel unsafe at home?
Ya know...

I'd bet the family killed during the home invasion described in Truman Capote's book "In Cold Blood" (true story about a Kansas family) would - if they'd survived - wish that someone in their family had been carrying on that ill fated day. Then there's the more recent killings that took place in CT during a home invasion. There are more examples but those are two most folk probably have at least some knowledge of.

I used to think there was no such thing as a dumb question. Guess I'VE been wrong all these years.

jungleroy
June 8, 2008, 11:06 PM
Because my home is not a firearm free zone.

arizona98tj
June 9, 2008, 01:13 AM
I've noticed quite a few who post here claim they carry a holstered gun at home while going about their daily routine around the house. ...... Do you feel unsafe at home?
I don't live in the best neighborhood anymore....it was pretty good 22 years ago when I bought my house, but times have changed.

That being said, I have a couple of options available to ensure my safety and that of my family. I can carry a 2" J-frame or I can carry 150 pounds of doberman pincher and pit bull (http://www.stu-offroad.com/images/angel&syra.jpg). Contrary to what you may have heard, fitting the latter in your pocket isn't that easy. :rolleyes:

La Pistoletta
June 9, 2008, 04:21 AM
But, I guess I'm not prepared (or is it paranoid?) enough to carry inside of my house in my low-crime suburban neighborhood. Examples of things going wrong in any area exist, but it isn't worth the trouble to me when I'm relaxing in my sweats at home!

What does it matter if it's "low-crime" if you're the one it happens to? I have yet to hear about a NO-crime residential zone.

Plus, it isn't like I'm helpless without a gun. A firearm is only one layer of defense. Awareness, security, and hand-to-hand tactics (among other things) should not be completely disregarded.

You can have those things - and a gun too.

As for me, well I'd carry but if you look to the left, below my name, you'll see where I live...

Carl N. Brown
June 9, 2008, 06:35 AM
Why Carry a Holstered Gun at Home?

Another Reason:

I bought one of those elastic waist-band holsters:
the ones that look like an exercise belt with a
pocket for a pistol and two pockets for magazines
or revolver reload strips.

I carried my .38 snub in it about the house all day
before using it outdoors. The pistol stayed in place
and the holster was comfortable. Later my son,
grandson and I explored an abandoned rock quarry
outside town that was only accessible by foot.
The gun carried safely and confortably in that rig.
I have carried that .38 in that rig outdoors often
since then.

I later tried carrying a remington-style derringer
about the house in that rig, and it would always
work its way out of the pistol pocket in the waist
band.

It is better to test a concealed carry rig in the home
than on the street or in the field.

Carl N. Brown
June 9, 2008, 06:39 AM
A low-crime suburban neighborhood is often the neighborhood "cased" by burglars or home invaders for lucrative targets or by sadists looking for victims to rape, torture and kill.

scndactive
June 9, 2008, 05:08 PM
I live in a wooded area along side a river next to a public park

off the top of my head I would say dogs, snakes, gators, and thugs. And not in that order

MD_Willington
June 9, 2008, 08:21 PM
When I was allowed too...

I carried even at home, I live on a major thoroughfare and have all manner of vehicle and persons pull up in front of my house all the time, even though it is not legal to park on my side of the road...

Last month some greasy looking fella was parked in front of my house and was spying on my female neighbors, older mom, one daughter in mid twenties, and daughter in teens, all are very good looking, and all were working in the yard at the time.

Then we get some shady looking people who are in plain site of my children playing in the fenced yard...


We also have no local LEOs...

Currently, my State has legally disarmed my family, on hand for defense is a Chainsaw and a nice bit of pipe, other than that... I have some pointy sticks.

coloradokevin
June 9, 2008, 08:33 PM
A low-crime suburban neighborhood is often the neighborhood "cased" by burglars or home invaders for lucrative targets or by sadists looking for victims to rape, torture and kill.

Okay... I work as a police officer in one of the less desirable areas of my state. Crime is through the roof there, and home invasion robberies/burglaries/carjackings are not at all uncommon.

I don't live there.

I disagree with your comment, and again state that while it can happen, it isn't likely to. In fact, I'm not aware of any home invasion robberies having taken place in any of the suburban neighborhoods I have lived in, ever... And, I do read the crime statistics, and talk with the local LEO's who police my area.

Again, it could happen. But, it isn't likely to. And, statistics would support that (despite the fact that many noteable incidents have taken place in "quiet" neighborhoods -- hence why they made the news in the first place).


What does it matter if it's "low-crime" if you're the one it happens to? I have yet to hear about a NO-crime residential zone.

...

You can have those things - and a gun too.


You are correct, there is probably no area that has never had a crime. But, again, there has not been a single home invasion robbery in my neighborhood in the time that I have lived here, and the same can be said for the other places I have resided in the past 15 years. The most noteable incident that has happened in a neighborhood that I have lived in (excluding shady areas near campuses when I was in college) was a guy who shot his wife in a domestic, then himself.

I do own a gun, and I carry one on-duty for 40 hours a week. I also carry off-duty whenever I leave the house, which is a requirement of my job. But, I still don't buy the argument that I am not safe if I don't wear the pistol at home.

I just finished a ten hour shift and got home about twenty minutes ago (unusual hours for me today). I was wearing a gun for the last ten hours, I hardly feel like keeping that belt on at home.

But, I won't accept that this choice on my part means I'm foolishly not looking out for my safety (it isn't like I left my gun at work... it is only ten feet away from me right now. And, again, it isn't the only option I have to protect myself).


As I've said before... Do what you want, but I think the idea does smell a bit of paranoia in a circumstance like mine (other folks face different situations).

Defensory
June 10, 2008, 04:46 AM
"Home invasions only happen to bad people in bad neighborhoods!" :rolleyes:

Of course, any self-proclaimed home defense "expert" knows that home invasions just don't happen to "good" people in "nice" upper middle class suburban communities like Cheshire, Connecticut. :barf:

Or do they? :scrutiny:

"A quiet Connecticut community woke up on Tuesday to more details behind a home invasion that ended with a prominent doctor injured, his wife and two daughters killed and their house up in flames."

Complete article:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,290542,00.html

1911Tuner
June 10, 2008, 05:47 AM
while it can happen, it isn't likely to.

Beinbg struck by lightning isn't very likely. either...yet people do get struck.

I still don't buy the argument that I am not safe if I don't wear the pistol at home.


About 3 weeks ago, over in Winston-Salem...a couple delivering a Meals on Wheels walked into a home invasion in progress. The shut-in had been bludgeoned and was dead or dying. The invaders shot the man and his wife, killing her and nearly killing him. This occurred on a busy thoroughfare around noon. A little "paranoia" would probably have provided a different ending to that story.

I was wearing a gun for the last ten hours, I hardly feel like keeping that belt on at home.


It's supposed to be comforting...not comfortable.

1911 guy
June 10, 2008, 08:15 AM
Quote:
I was wearing a gun for the last ten hours, I hardly feel like keeping that belt on at home.

Well, when I go to work I wear a handgun, a few reloads and steel toe work boots. When I get home, I take off the unnecessary equipment. I put on sneakers.

lance22
June 10, 2008, 10:00 AM
Carrying at home sounds shocking to uninitiated ears. But so does carrying in general. Heck, owning any firearm for any purpose can sound shocking depending on your background.

The more people hear about it, the less shocking it seems. Personally, I'm shocked by the boldness and heinousness of many crimes, and the fact that some wish to protect themselves should be viewed with charity.

beaucoup ammo
June 10, 2008, 10:36 AM
I see San Antonio as an "average" big city (1.5million). There are at least two (2) home invasions every day. These crimes cross economic lines and rarely is the home owner strapped at the time.

The home invasions that make the headlines are the ones where the home owner IS strapped, prepared (what a concept!) for the off chance someone will break into their home.

The paper, without fail, mentions in some form "the bad guy chose the wrong house to rob" whenever the owner employs rational thinking by toting at home, which he has every legal and logical right to do.

Wether random or planned due to the home owner's age or physical condition, these "invasions" happen every day. We have home owner's insurance, auto insurance, health insurance, etc. Why wouldn't anyone in their right mind NOT want to protect the lives and well being of their family, themselves and the items they've worked so hard to get from the thousands of career, predator criminals who exist for one reason: to inflict harm and economic hardship on hard working, law abiding Americans?

MinnMooney
June 10, 2008, 11:34 AM
One less decision to make.

When I made the decision to carry, I decided to carry 24/7.

I don't have to think "should I carry to..." it is already in place.

Exactly. I was out back splitting logs (VERY noisy and your mind HAS to be on the task at hand - or your hand might come off) when my neighbor walked up to me and stood 20 feet away. It was several seconds before I noticed him and shut the engine off. He asked, "Are you was about to be robbed or invaded?" I simply said, "I don't know. Do you have a crystal ball?"

I carry 99.9% of the time. I'd carry it in the shower except I wasn't born equipt with beltloops.

blackcash88
June 10, 2008, 01:35 PM
Currently, my State has legally disarmed my family, on hand for defense is a Chainsaw and a nice bit of pipe, other than that... I have some pointy sticks.

Your location says you're in Washington state. How have they legally disarmed you? Guns aren't banned in WA.

As for the "never would happen in my nice neighborhood" types, uh, where do you think all the good stuff is? Hmmm, would Mr. Thug rather rob a well-to-do house and get some quality goods or rob one of his neighbors in the subsidized housing projects only to make off with some grape soda, malt liquor and pork rinds? Well, he could probably score some drugs and maybe even a phat set of spinnerz or sneakerz. :rolleyes:

GaryP
June 10, 2008, 04:29 PM
Well, whether I carry a holstered weapon at home or not is a personal decision and no explanation is necessary! :what:


:evil:

Leanwolf
June 10, 2008, 06:09 PM
WEREWOLF - "I'd bet the family killed during the home invasion described in Truman Capote's book "In Cold Blood" (true story about a Kansas family) would - if they'd survived - wish that someone in their family had been carrying on that ill fated day. "

Werewolf, a slight correction here. That incident and those murders happened at night, when the family was asleep. They slept with unlocked doors. (Hey, it was in a rural, "safe" area!)

Perry Smith and Richard Hickcock, the murderers, had no problem getting in the remote Clutter house. We'll never know what "might" have been the outcome if Mr. Clutter had had a pistol beside the bed.

In my opinion, people who "feel safe" and leave their doors unlocked, and their windows open, are very foolish indeed.

L.W.

Defensory
June 11, 2008, 02:55 AM
There were 448 home invasions in Houston in 2005, a 25% increase over the previous year.

In Sacramento, there were 63 home invasions in the first five months of 2006, a 37% increase over the same period the previous year.

cambeul41
June 11, 2008, 01:06 PM
coloradokevin says,
I think the idea does smell a bit of paranoia

but he is required to carry when on duty and required to carry when away from home even when off duty. Mightn't that influence his thinking? "If I don't have to, I'm not going to!"

I carry even at home, not out of fear, not because I have to, but because I like guns and carrying whenever I can makes decision making and remembering just that much easier.

papajohn
June 11, 2008, 01:23 PM
I've tried all my life to schedule my crises for convenient times...............It hasn't worked out yet.

Bad guys are NOTORIOUS for interrupting things at a bad time.

I live on the ground floor of an apartment building in the inner city. In nice weather when lots of folks are out walking around, anyone walking by can see in the windows, see my stuff, see me. I'm not a physically imposing guy. I kinda resemble an older version of a Keebler elf. Sometimes my weapon's visible, sometimes not. But if I hear a strange sound, I don't have to remember where the nearest gun is. My hand is already on it, and the other is reaching for the SureFire light on my other hip. If I can blind a bad guy and take him down without shooting him, I'll choose that option. But I ALWAYS leave myself options!

Getting caught without a gun isn't what I consider a good option!

PJ

redneckrepairs
June 11, 2008, 02:43 PM
If i wear pants i wear a pistol . Home or not , If i get up and put on " jogging pants " well a Kahr pm9 is either dropped into the pocket of them , or clipped into the waist band . I have had folks visit my house who i would rather not even know where i live ( tho in all fairness all relate to my former occupation as an le ) . When i got out of LE i went to a ccw permit ( no i dont carry under the laws i could , i carry under colorados laws and only carry in recip states ) . IMHO if your not willing to carry all the time you are awake , and its legal then you should not carry at all . I just dont understand the idea of " i am home " or " i will only be in safe neighborhoods today " so i can " factor my risk "
If you feel like you can grade sort your risk , well good on ya , for myself i have no idea when i might need a pistol , that is why i carry . As a math thing i would not carry at all because pistols come at a cost . I choose to pay the cost but then i choose to have a career option where by i answered your calls .

1911Tuner
June 11, 2008, 02:57 PM
for myself i have no idea when i might need a pistol ,

I've tried all my life to schedule my crises for convenient times...............It hasn't worked out yet. Bad guys are NOTORIOUS for interrupting things at a bad time.

And there it is in a nutshell.

A wise man once said:

"A pistol is like an ambulance. You don't often need one, but when you do...you need it badly, and you need it immediately."

SUWANNEE MAN
June 11, 2008, 02:59 PM
[QUOTE] Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?


The same reason you wear a seat belt in your car, buy life insurance, health insurance, etc....

You don't get in your car thinking 'I'm going to go get into an automobile collision, so I better wear my seat belt today.'

You wear the seat belt (aside from it being the law), buy life insurance, health insurance, etc.... for the UNFORSEEABLE. I don't expect to get into an accident, die, or break my leg, but all the precautions are there anyway.

I don't forsee a crazed mad man kicking in my front door and chopping me to bits, or a crack head willing to crack my head for some silver wear, but like the seat belt, it there, just in case, never-the-less. Just like insurance.

Same reason I carry a first aid kit, spare tire, and a Leatherman Multi Tool...

rgs1975
June 11, 2008, 03:18 PM
If you think a physical location is inherantly safe simply because you happen to be there often and you call it "home" you've got another thing comin'.

Savage Shooter
June 11, 2008, 06:31 PM
DUH for when the....ZOMBIES attack :neener:

but seriously you can never be to prepaired for an home emergency.

dalepres
June 11, 2008, 08:41 PM
I was catching up on this thread when I saw an earlier poster, about page 3, said he never carries at home; all his guns are in safes at home. And he would never live in a town where home invasions are more than rare. He lives in San Diego.

http://www.google.com/search?q=san+diego+home+invasion&rls=com.microsoft:*&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&startIndex=&startPage=1

Interesting results. There was even a cop arrested for several home invasions in the Los Angeles area.

Keep in mind, folks, it only takes one home invasion for your family or loved ones to be dead. Ad you can't open your safe in time no matter what you think.

Huddog
June 11, 2008, 08:51 PM
Two events in the Atlanta area this week are prime examples of why. Familly gets assaulted, battered, robbed, tied up in their home in the middle of the day and a local deputy shoots and kills a home intruder who had shot and killed the deputies wife, report at this time is that robbery was the apparent motive also during daylight.

wristtwister
June 11, 2008, 09:12 PM
Of the 23 murders in our county last year, 17 occurred in our zip code. We are rift with illegals in the area, gang activity, and they are "branching out" into home invasions, ATM robberies, etc.

Several months ago, I was going to the ATM at night, and a van load of illegals bailed out and tried to "bum rush" my car. I simply held up my Smith 4006 and racked one into the chamber, and they ran all over each other getting back in their car and speeding off.

I carry concealed, and try to carry or have within arm's length at all times at least one high capacity pistol... and when carrying "out", I'm usually also carrying a backup gun and a couple of extra high capacity clips. Around the house, I'd rather have it on me than have to run to another room to find it. It's MY property... and if I need a gun, there's no legitimate reason for me to have to expect to follow some imagined protocol of manners for dealing with a bad guy. As an ex-LEO, I don't have much sympathy for them if they're in MY house. That's why the state passed the "castle doctrine" ordinance for self defense.

WT

Treo
June 12, 2008, 01:18 AM
QUOTE: " I simply held up my Smith 4006 and racked one into the chamber,"

If you're gonna carry a gun why carry a gun W/ an empty chamber?

What would you do if they pulled up right next to you ?

papajohn
June 13, 2008, 04:48 AM
I wear a gun at work, in a relatively "Normal" part of the city. My neighborhood at home is a lot less safe. Why would I come home, and stop wearing a gun? That's backwards.

I think it was Mark Moritz who best answered this whole carry/don't carry thing 20 years ago when he said, "You can't make an appointment for an Emergency."

Exactly. Everyone I say that to, immediately gets it. Succinct is Good.

Papajohn

LAK
June 13, 2008, 07:01 AM
Why Carry A Holstered Gun At Home?
Because it is more convenient than a pocket - or in your hand.

koja48
June 13, 2008, 08:30 AM
To each his/her own, but I'll continue to prefer mine closer than 10 feet away & on my person. I wouldn't describe owning guns, having a gun 10 feet away, or carrying at home as paranoia. Nor would I describe not carrying as unsafe . . . I would simply describe carrying as more prepared & not carrying as less prepared than one could be. Carrying on my person is a convenience, and one that may make all the difference if a threat to mine or me suddenly appears . . . the term "more tactical advantage" comes to mind. Guess I'd rather pull my handgun than scramble to retrieve it in times of trouble. I live in a nice, quiet middle-class neighborhood where folks keep nice, desirable things in their homes. Now apart from gang & drug-related type activities/assaults in seedy neighborhoods, I just don't recall many home invasions/burglaries in such locales . . . predators tend to hunt where the game resides, or as my Dad used to say: "You can only pick the fruit where you find the tree."

blackcash88
June 13, 2008, 12:32 PM
Because it is more convenient than a pocket - or in your hand.

I find pocket carry quite convenient and I don't have to wear a belt. Always have the PM9 on me, even in sweats. My only other option aside from IWB/OWB, which requires a belt, is my Smartcarry, but I don't find it all that comfortable so pocket carry reigns supreme with me.

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