Keep your guns locked up and way from ammo!


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brockgl
May 2, 2008, 06:09 PM
--Is what I keep hearing from everyone! It seems crazy to me to keep my guns locked up in one part of the house and all ammunition locked in the opposite side of the house. What then is the point of having a gun for home protection? I am starting this thread, because my wife and I just had our first son. He is 9 months old now and soon he'll be to the age where he can maneuver around quite easily. Obviously, I would never go to the extent of locking all guns in one side of the house and all ammo in the other. However, to you all with young children, what advice would you give me for keeping the young ones who are too young to train how to use a weapon away from danger? I currently keep three loaded guns in the house. A Remington 870 shotgun (Daddy's go-to gun for home protection) which is on the second rung of my gun rack on the wall next to my bed; a Sig P229 .40 cal (Mommies go-to gun for home protection) which is inside her nightstand; and a CZ 452 Ultra Lux .22 (The go-to gun for varmints that may roam onto the property that need to be disposed of). None of these guns are chambered. All need to be racked or pumped to load their first round. Also, the shotgun and the rifle have safety switches which are on, and the Sig has a pretty heavy trigger pull that i think any young child would definitely have a hard time with (that is if they actually knew to rack the slide and were strong enough to do it).

I feel completely safe. The wife knows how to use all the guns mentioned for any of those occasions. However, I am definitely up for hearing some advice, and/or what others do for keeping their guns away from the babies.

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FourTeeFive
May 2, 2008, 06:14 PM
I would be more concerned with coming home to find someone else inside holding that 870.

markk
May 2, 2008, 06:19 PM
Keep your guns locked up and way from ammo!

--Is what I keep hearing from everyone!

Who is this "everyone" from whom you keep hearing this?

Tyris
May 2, 2008, 06:21 PM
The baby cant chamber a round, and wont have the hand strength to do so (with pistol) for probably another decade at least.

I dont see a problem.

-T

brockgl
May 2, 2008, 06:23 PM
Who is this "everyone" from whom you keep hearing this?

Everyone = obvious antis like the news, my son's pediatrician, some family members not inside my immediately family, etc...

brockgl
May 2, 2008, 06:24 PM
I would be more concerned with coming home to find someone else inside holding that 870.

So, is your advice that I should indeed lock my weapons in some way so that an intruder cannot turn my own guns against me?

Dksimon
May 2, 2008, 06:28 PM
I think you should be fine.

kingpin008
May 2, 2008, 06:30 PM
Ideally, if you're not home, they should probably be locked up. If a badguy breaks in and you're away, they should have to at least have to work a little bit to steal them instead of just grabbing 'em out of a nightstand or off your gunrack.

ArmedBear
May 2, 2008, 06:32 PM
So, is your advice that I should indeed lock my weapons in some way so that an intruder cannot turn my own guns against me?

Hell yes! When you're not there to use the weapon on an intruder, you want to make sure you don't make it easy for him to use it on you, or your wife or baby.

IMHO, if you don't plan to use a particular gun for home defense, keep the gun locked up and the ammo separate.

I've got a pile of old milsurps I got real cheap "just cuz" a while ago. I don't plan to use them for home defense. They stay locked up. Same for the hunting rifle, .22's, etc.

There are also ways to lock up guns that leave them quickly accessible, if you DO plan to use them defensively, but will be leaving them at home when you're not there.

We have loaded and ready pistols, and reloads, in a quick-access safe. I can have them out whenever it's appropriate and lock them up quickly otherwise -- knowing that, even locked up, I can get them again in 5 seconds or less.

I like the digital-keypad style long gun safes, too. They open really fast, but they lock up, too.

Seems to me, if you aren't in control of your firearm at a given time, it should be stored in such a way as to not give others easy control of it (kids, burglars, dogs -- yes, a dog killed a hunter this year by knocking over a shotgun and stepping on the trigger). Better safe than sorry.

Wetawd
May 2, 2008, 06:33 PM
I think u should be fine. But give it a year or to, with some determination and experimenting your child will be able to rack the slide. My little brother is 4 and and he can completely field strip two of guns and I am teaching how to strip another one now (he does it all without any help from me in any way).:)

Diggers
May 2, 2008, 07:16 PM
I don't think its antis saying keep your ammo and guns separate. I've heard gun people say it as a safety measure.

I don't think antis would think about such things.

Any how I don't really understand the logic of that.

Why does locking up your gun and ammo in the same place make an unsafe situation??

Avenger29
May 2, 2008, 07:20 PM
The baby cant chamber a round, and wont have the hand strength to do so (with pistol) for probably another decade at least.

I dont see a problem.

-T

You probably shouldn't rely on that (and revolvers don't need a slide to be racked for chambering). Doesn't sound very safe. And you shouldn't underestimate children, no matter how young they are.

Relying on trigger locks is also bad. You need to get a safe/RSC as soon as you can. Many people lock the safe when they are away and unlock it at home, or put in all but the last combination when they are at home.

distra
May 2, 2008, 07:41 PM
I have a 3yr old so I think I can address this first hand, pax feel free to jump in. I have my HD guns in a safe with loaded mags next to the bed. My reloading supplies, powder, primers and loaded ammo are all in a locked cabinet in the downstairs. The deal is you want to have redundency in the system. The first thing is education. At 9months there is not much to do, but keep them away, however @ 3yrs old they understand a bit more. We have never kept our firearms out sight, that's rediculous and can cause more harm through curiousity later. We've educated the boy about touching and that he can only touch when we are around. We've also started muzzle discipline since he likes to "skeet" shoot with the vaccum hose :D He does pretty well, but it's constant reinforcement on the rules which will continue through out his life. With number 2 due this summer, I decided to build a nice secure cabinet for reloading supplies which leads me to the second level of redundency, security. Locking the firearms up keeps the bored kids from getting into trouble. Keeping the ammo separate except for your HD weapon is the third layer. NEVER under estimate your kids ability to learn and observe what you are doing i.e. don't let him watch you open the safe. They learn fast and comprehend more than we can imagine at an early age. The three levels again are educations, locking the firearms up, and keep the bangy things in a separate spot if they do get in the safe.

Added: If you reload, please keep powder and primers locked up. These can be just as dangerous i.e. box of primers and a hammer.:eek:

3KillerBs
May 2, 2008, 07:43 PM
Go to www.corneredcat.com and read the articles on guns and kids.

I have 4 kids. All of them are clever, curious, and strong. A gun in plain sight on a wall can be readily accessed by a clever, curious 2yo.

If you go back a couple weeks you'll see threads about a 3yo fatally shooting herself in the head.

Kids are smarter than you think. They grow faster than you think. There is no such thing as too much redundant safety when kids are involved.

My kids are good, obedient, well-meaning kids. But like all kids they are subject to having "good ideas". Just yesterday my 8yo thought that he should take our cockatiels outside and let them fly around in the fresh air for a while. Fortunately, he asked if he could.

The now 14yo once almost set the car on fire only a couple years ago. The now 16yo could disassemble the baseboard hot water heaters by the time he was 18 months old. This morning the 2yo, sent to carry an empty coffee cup 10 feet across the room from one adult to another, tried to grab the coffee pot and pour the cup himself.

You need to protect your kids from home invaders. But first you must protect them from their own curiosity and their own ignorance of the consequences of their actions. :)

Any gun that is not on your person and under your direct control should be locked up in a way that would protect them from an adult.

Quick-access safes for defense guns are available.

bogie
May 2, 2008, 07:44 PM
Some folks also need to lay off the coffee!!!!!!!!

jrfoxx
May 2, 2008, 08:24 PM
If the 870 is high enough to be sure its out of reach, I'd say that ones fine. For the ones in the nightstand, you can get those child proofing dealies for the drawer. My understanding is that they dont "lock" it per se, so an adult can sill open them just as fast and easy as normal, but a young child doesnt have the strength, or the design is such they cant figure out what to do to open it. (It beleive there are several types and there are different ways they work, so you'd need to personally check them out to see what seems safe for the child, but is still as fast as normal to open for you and the wife.) just a thought.

I havenever used the drawer thingies, only seen them in use in friends homes (and thus have manipulated them a only couple times), and have neve personally had a small child in my house 24-7,since I have owned guns, but HAVE livd with women wit small children, and had freids who had gus and had some, so I knowthat the little buggers are fast, quiet, and sneak, but the child proofing things seem to work well from what I've seen, and been told, and they dont seem to slow dwn an adult who knows how to wok them, so hey are something to consider at least. My stp daughter was 11 when I met her, and in 16 now, so luckily, I didnt have to worry about toddlers and such with my guns.

btg3
May 2, 2008, 08:29 PM
a nice secure cabinet for reloading supplies
... is what my dad failed to have, so his son progressively experimented ... and amazingly didn't blow anyone up.

Black Adder LXX
May 2, 2008, 08:38 PM
I feel completely safe. The wife knows how to use all the guns mentioned for any of those occasions. However, I am definitely up for hearing some advice, and/or what others do for keeping their guns away from the babies.

I definitely second reading the ENTIRE site www.corneredcat.com - It has really helped me out a lot with my 4 little ones.

As far as the ammo separate from the guns. Well, they do load themselves and come after you when you sleep...

What I do, is target/range pistols are locked up unloaded. HD guns are ALWAYS loaded, safety off where applicable, and locked in small gunsafes with keypad entry, throughout the house. That's just what I do.

I really like what pax talks about on cornered cat though, about carrying it around the house on her so it's constantly under her control. I'm just not 'there yet' with my wifey and am just glad she's coming around on getting her permit in the first place. That will be next year's issue for now...

dmazur
May 3, 2008, 12:54 AM
I can't seem to get a link to the product, but if you go to this site and select "gun safes" and then click on the "Phoenix" logo, you'll see their three products. They make two for pistols and one for rifles, which sounds like what you need. Expensive at around $700 (incl shipping), but this takes care of storing guns where kids can't get into them, yet quickly available.

http://www.gunlocker.com/SafeSite_content.html

I have one of the smaller units with the "door holsters", as I don't have any loaded long guns in the house. They're stored in a separate safe, which is quite time-consuming to open.

The Riflelocker is identical, but longer. It fits between studs in a bedroom closet. The keypad lights up when you press the first button in the combination. (I'd choose a corner number, like 1 or 3 maybe, for the first digit so you can start off by touch...after that they're illuminated.)

CU74
May 3, 2008, 12:55 AM
I don't worry a whole lot about my guns finding the ammo stash, loading themselves and coming after me.

All of our children are grown and gone - it's just the wife and me at home - so we keep our "social work" firearms loaded. Guns in the basement are in a lockable cabinet with ammo in cans nearby. Guns out in my shop are either in a locked cabinet, (semi-auto/lever) or in open racks with the bolts removed. I have multiple cases of ammo stored in the same room. Never had a problem with the guns loading themselves..........

klover
May 3, 2008, 01:43 AM
can be a drag for the firemen that might enter. If you keep it loaded, you might want to secure the muzzle in a safe direction.
No little kids here, and the doors are very, very stout.

Tyris
May 3, 2008, 02:09 AM
You probably shouldn't rely on that (and revolvers don't need a slide to be racked for chambering). Doesn't sound very safe. And you shouldn't underestimate children, no matter how young they are.

Original poster mentioned nothing of revolvers.

-T

Kind of Blued
May 3, 2008, 04:08 AM
Why does locking up your gun and ammo in the same place make an unsafe situation??

For the same reason that guns kill people. They are evil and have a will of their own.

RoostRider
May 3, 2008, 05:08 AM
I'm with the keep it away from the child (kids can do amazing things, even by accident) and keep it locked when you are not home.... best is locked even when you are home (speed safe)...

I haven't seen any in a long while, but I have a clock radio with a safe inside and a 4 digit lock (hidden under a panel)... this works great as it is easy to get at, locked unless I need it, and doesn't even look like a gun safe....

Unless you are gang bum rushed in your home, I can't see needing more than one loaded gun easily accessible...

Paragon
May 3, 2008, 06:22 AM
The baby cant chamber a round, and wont have the hand strength to do so (with pistol) for probably another decade at least.

I wouldn't rely on that. If a kid were to hold the pistol with both hands on the grip and try to push the slide/hook the sights against something like a door jamb or a table and push with his body weight, I bet he could rack the slide. Safeties are just switches, no different than turning on a TV. My 2 year old nephew understands how a pistol works (i.e. slide needs to be racked, trigger needs to be pulled) from watching his daddy play on the X-Box. I love my son a lot more than my guns, so I keep mine locked up. I have 2 quick access safes, one in my bedroom, and one in the closet downstairs, both with a pistol in them. The few seconds it may take me to get to them are worth not putting my kid at risk.

qajaq59
May 3, 2008, 06:41 AM
Quick-access safes for defense guns are available.Just put a handgun safe under the bed where you can drop your arm down and reach the buttons to get at it. Then lock up the rest of them. You'll only need one gun anyway. And when it comes to doing what they shouldn't, 2 years olds are smarter then Einstein.

Dysfunctional Individual
May 3, 2008, 07:31 AM
I feel completely safe.

I don't see a problem.

Sounds like famous last words...

cracked butt
May 3, 2008, 07:32 AM
Quote:
a nice secure cabinet for reloading supplies

... is what my dad failed to have, so his son progressively experimented ... and amazingly didn't blow anyone up.

Yes, that lesson isn't lost on me either......

alexanderplatz
May 3, 2008, 07:46 AM
I would rather have 100% safety for my child than 99.9% safety. Therefore I would not leave any loaded firearms around, chambered rounds or not, where he could get to them. This includes him taking a chair and using it to stand on to reach high places, which I did all the time when I was a tot. My son seems naturally inclined to try to take things apart and fiddle with gadgets. He could remove the battery cover on the TV remote when he was less than 18 months. I would get a quick-access safe for any loaded gun I wanted to keep handy.

Gun Geezer
May 3, 2008, 08:03 AM
Do you EVER have kids or teens in the house? Ever? Nephews, nieces, cousins, etc? Neighbor kid ever get paid to cut the grass and "need" to use the facilities?

So many ways a kid/teen can maybe be in the house, find a gun, and then your world changes forever.

My own dad kept a .357 S&W in a "safe" drawer supposedly too high up for a kid to reach into. One day, Mom is cleaning and finds a kids cushy ball or some such in that same drawer. One of my kiddos put it in there for safe keeping. Could she have fired it? No, not likely. But she could certainly have carried and dropped it. As we live in Texas, dad actually committted a crime here by having a firearm where a kid could access it.

My shottie has a compression lock on the trigger I can remove in less than 1 second. My bed stand gun is in a keyless box I can open in the dark (by feel) in a heartbeat.

Invest another $200. It's for the children. Really.:banghead:

Homerboy
May 3, 2008, 08:16 AM
I would rather have 100% safety for my child than 99.9% safety. Therefore I would not leave any loaded firearms around, chambered rounds or not, where he could get to them. This includes him taking a chair and using it to stand on to reach high places, which I did all the time when I was a tot. My son seems naturally inclined to try to take things apart and fiddle with gadgets. He could remove the battery cover on the TV remote when he was less than 18 months. I would get a quick-access safe for any loaded gun I wanted to keep handy.

We have a 9 month old boy as well. My rifles and shotguns are kept in a rifle safe. There is one AR mag loaded and the Remington 870 has 5 shells on the buttstock. My son will never know the combo until he is a young adult.

My pistols are a bit different. I keep a Beretta PX4 in a gunvault next to my bed. The mag is loaded, but not chambered and the safety is on. If I ever had to grab it, I just know I have to chamber a round. My wife's side of the bed has a S&W K frame loaded in a V-Line safe. Same deal with the combo. My other pistols sit in two pistol safes bolted in the closet. The 9MM's are in one, with the .38 ammo in them, and the revolvers are in the other, with the 9MM ammo in them. To load them, you would have to open BOTH safes.

I'll probably change things as he gets older, but I agree with one thing. If they're not going to be used for defense, keep them unloaded and the ammo away from the guns.

doc2rn
May 3, 2008, 08:57 AM
Kids will suprise you. Look at accidental discharge of .45 on YouTube. I couldn't get on right now to post a link for some reason but you will know it when you see it.

papajohn
May 3, 2008, 09:48 AM
I have four kids, all grown, but all were raised with guns accessible. Since you can't actually child-proof a gun, the only alternative is to gun-proof the child. Those too young to comprehend are kept out of the loop. Those old enough to understand are shown, graphically, what guns are capable of. (Blowing up a cantaloupe is a good way to get their attention, tell them to pretend it's their head, then let fly. They WILL remember that!)

Beat the safety rules into them from the time they understand language. It pays off.

Teach them all guns are always loaded, unless a grownup clears them. In time they become responsible enough to do it themselves.

Let them handle, manipulate and dry-fire any gun they can. It removes the "Forbidden Fruit" aspect. I let my kids handle any gun, any time (within reason), and made them show me the safety features, and the proper method of opening/checking/clearing each weapon. My kids took great pride in knowing how.

Once they've demonstrated that they can safely handle the weapons and understand the safety rules (ESPECIALLY Muzzle awareness!) take them shooting. Once they see how the guns feel and react, they understand even better. The one rule I beat into my kids from day one was No Touching The Trigger Until The Sights Are On Target. If they follow that one all the time, there is a lot less to worrry about!

Shooting is a great family activity. It teaches responsibility, safety, and independence, among other things. Enjoy those little kids......in about twenty minutes they'll be asking to borrow the car...........:rolleyes:

Papajohn

3KillerBs
May 3, 2008, 11:55 AM
Well said, Papajohn.

But even so, its important to add redundant layers of safety because even the best-behaved kids get "good ideas" that, in their undeveloped minds, are perfectly reasonable, logical, and sensible. They simply don't have the mature judgment and discretion to foresee all the potential consequences. :)

Auburn1992
May 3, 2008, 12:04 PM
I just keep all my guns in the safe and ammo in my room

buck460XVR
May 3, 2008, 12:09 PM
Well said, Papajohn.

But even so, its important to add redundant layers of safety because even the best-behaved kids get "good ideas" that, in their undeveloped minds, are perfectly reasonable, logical, and sensible. They simply don't have the mature judgment and discretion to foresee all the potential consequences.


I too have to agree with Papajohn. My kids(like I did) have grown up with guns and have seen by the game I have brought home and cleaned in the garage with them at my side the damage they do. They also have been taught how to safely handle and shoot every gun in the house since the time they were old/big enough to handle them. Just a coupla weekend ago I had the youngest try and decock my old .32 special with gloves on just to prove a point. Pointed in a safe direction and blowing a biigazz hole in the ground proved the point better than all the words I had used before that.

That said, I still don't invite trouble be leaving loaded guns laying around the house. Guns have their place, ammo has it's place and the HD shotty has it's place under the bed.

papajohn
May 3, 2008, 12:25 PM
"They simply don't have the mature judgment and discretion to foresee all the potential consequences".

3KBs, I agree. But I was a rotten kid, sneaky and devious, and I know how their minds think of evil things to do. So I was very careful to point out that I understood those urges, and then I pointed out the potential consequences in graphic detail. Starting with the "Maybe nothing really bad happens" thing, and ending with the "suppose you accidently shot your best friend...." scenario, to include the police, the local prosecutor, and the local slammer. Then I reminded them that they could handle and dry-fire them any time they wanted, all they had to do was ask. Apparently it worked. They understand consequences pretty well.

Both my sons became my shooting buddies, both daughters eventually got bored with it all and moved on. All four kids are good shooters, and enjoy it, but not as much as I do, except for the youngest. He's as nutty as I am, and while he loves shooting my AR-15, I think his biggest gut-rush was blowing holes in stuff with my 375. He's also a GOOD pistol shot, and he ought to be.........he's been shooting since he was 3, and he was pretty good even then! I wonder where he gets it................;)

BTW, the 22's are GREAT teaching tools........better stock up on ammo!

PJ

3KillerBs
May 3, 2008, 01:03 PM
:D

.22 ammo is probably going to become one of the largest line items in the family entertainment budget.

langenc
May 3, 2008, 01:08 PM
I didntread all posts so perhaps this was mentioned.

get one of those vaults and mount it somewhere convenient. Loaded ready to go guns can then be stored in them. Wife and you can have seperate pass codes or some have print readers. Nothing better than that-for the next 20 yrs.

moooose102
May 3, 2008, 09:42 PM
everybody thinks what they are doing is the right way to do it. all i will say is this. do what you can live with. but try to imagine how you will feel if junior finds and does manage to get a round off. think about what WILL happen, all of it. then let your concience be your guide! personally, i think you will find that almost everyone is going to tell you that you somehow have to keep ALL your guns away from junior. and i agree. how you do it, is up to you. again, personally, i think a safe of some sort is in order. but that is up to you. i can't imagine living without my kids, or wife!

CHAINGUNMASSACRE
May 3, 2008, 09:49 PM
I grew up around firearms. I was the oldest of 6 kids, and we were all taught firearms safety, handling, and actual shooting as early as we were able to be taught. I was shooting a ruger single six, and a 10/22 at 4 years of age, no exaggeration. There was always a 1911, cocked and locked under mom and dad's bed. We knew it was there, and it was the weapon we were taught to use after the 22's. We were also warned to never touch it, play with it or show it to friends without dad there. I'm not gonna lie, there were times I was home alone that I'd take it out of its holster, smell the leather,feel those walnut grips, never taking it off safe or doing anything dumb. I was just enamored with that pistol, and still am to this day. I would always wipe a little oil on it and put it back so dad didn't know what I'd done, but let's be honest-I'm sure some of you did the same thing.

tntwatt
May 3, 2008, 09:59 PM
Everyone = obvious antis like the news, my son's pediatrician
Next pediatrician visit, ask him/her what makes them an expert on gun safety and if they realize that as a medical professional giving professional advice, that they become liable for any injuries resulting from said advice.

Recommending you separate your ammo from your firearm is like recommending you lock up asthma meds or heart meds to prevent overdose. If you can't get to the meds in time because you can't find the key, asthma attack becomes death, chest pain becomes death. The pediatrician obviously would recommend "safe storage" for meds vs storage that could lead to injury or death. There are also many forms of firearm storage that are both safe and leave you adequate access in times of need. They should be just as well informed about firearms or keep their mouth shut.

guntotinguy
May 3, 2008, 10:04 PM
Keyword...your the responsible person.Gun safe...or secured hidden spaces.


My kids are all flown from the roost,but I did keep all guns locked up and away,now,even in the gunsafes most all firearms are...well the best way to put it...armed!The only 2 who have any kind of 'real access' is the wife and I,but as a parent and a friend who has children that oftimes visits'...secure gunsafes...

alsaqr
May 3, 2008, 10:19 PM
"Recommending you separate your ammo from your firearm is like recommending you lock up asthma meds or heart meds to prevent overdose."

+1

I have several S&W Model 10 revolvers loose in this house. A handgun is in my possession 24/7. My AR15 is loaded in the bedroom. Twice in my lifetime I have had to protect my family from gun armed home invaders. Guns in any kind of safe would have meant that my family and I would all be dead.

CHAINGUNMASSACRE
May 3, 2008, 10:23 PM
Next pediatrician visit, ask him/her what makes them an expert on gun safety and if they realize that as a medical professional giving professional advice, that they become liable for any injuries resulting from said advice. Our children's pediatrician is a "gun guy" In fact, I shot with him today. It all depends on the doctor.

scrat
May 3, 2008, 10:28 PM
If you guys are going to start saying that guns kill people again. Then my keyboard is at fault for all the mispelled words that i type. So there.

distra
May 3, 2008, 10:44 PM
If you guys are going to start saying that guns kill people again.

"No husbands that come home early do!" LTCG :D Could not resist.

In all seriousness, it not about the guns loading themselves and shooting someone, it's about children's access to them before the kids are responsible enough to be safe 110% of the time. Curiousity can be dangerous when it involves firearms. Keep your HD firearms at the ready where you can get to them quickly, but keep the rest out of reach of the kids. And if they do get in the safe, if there is no ammo to load the worst they can do is pistol whip someone. Redundent safety mechanisms are a must around children.

tntwatt
May 3, 2008, 11:57 PM
Our children's pediatrician is a "gun guy" In fact, I shot with him today. It all depends on the doctor.

100% agreement!

qajaq59
May 4, 2008, 05:59 AM
I think if you polled this group you'd find that the older guys, that have already raised kids, are the ones opting for the safes. We've already experienced just how good kids are at getting into things that we don't want them to get at. You likely only need one gun for HD and that can go in a quickly opened safe. The others I would lock up as tight as you can. High places and great hiding spots don't slow a 3 year old down a bit. They have good brains and unlimited time to get into mischief.

RH822
May 4, 2008, 07:27 AM
As soon as your kid is old enough to understand simple instructions, take him to the gun room and TEACH him not to touch, do this often and let them handle them to help curb their curiosity. I have had guns and kids around this house for twenty five year and never a problem. Guns and kids, it's really not as a difficult situation as some people would lead you to believe.

RH

76shuvlinoff
May 4, 2008, 08:09 AM
Do what you gotta do but all I can say is I know how sneaky I was when no one was around to monitor me. Left to my own devices I handled every firearm in the place as a youngster from the P38 in Dad's dresser drawer to the shotguns on my older brother's walls and I'm talking under 10 years old.

We have one child, she's sixteen. She's been taught to handle most of the firearms but if there are visitors in the house, and that includes family, the weapons are locked up.

thunder173
May 4, 2008, 08:15 AM
Have two kids, both now adults. When they were small,...son about a year and 1/2,...daughter about 10,....came home one evening, went to the bedroom to change clothes after work. Found my revolver that I kept loaded in the night stand on the floor beside the bed, cylinder open, and rounds all over the floor. Locked my guns up after that whenever kids are around. My suggestion,...find a way to do both, if you have kids about. Keep the HD weapons secure,...but at the ready and accesable. Keep everthing else locked up.

John828
May 4, 2008, 09:25 AM
Long story short:

About four or five years after parents divorce,
mom starts getting some creepy phone calls
Dad buys mom a cheap .25 Auto,
phone calls end,
mom gives .25 to dad,
I visit dad on weekends,
dad takes me hunting every fall,
I shoot only shotguns but read about those "exotic" rifles and handguns in gun porn mags.
I only know long gun operation.
I fondle every gun I ever get a chance to.
I find cheap .25 auto
I fondle.
I figure out how to release the magazine.
I am pointing the gun in all directions.
I wonder if it is loaded (about ten minutes later)
I point gun down into mattress and pull trigger
One quarter inch hole in mattress and one scared kid.

I was about twelve at the time. I don't have kids, but I do know why curiousity kills the cat.

I cannot add too much to what has currently been said; the OP will have to make his own mind up and satisfy the requirements of his own conscience. But, if I had kids in the house, I would know darn sure that whenever they got a chance, they would be handling guns behind my back.

FourTeeFive
May 6, 2008, 08:08 PM
So, is your advice that I should indeed lock my weapons in some way so that an intruder cannot turn my own guns against me?

Yes. When I'm not home every gun is locked up.

Bezoar
May 6, 2008, 08:31 PM
this recomendation quasi rule for seperating guns from ammo is for a few reasons.
-safety, it cant be stolen if locked up
-timmy/sussie cant take it to show and tell and play "whack the teacher"

However, and the somewhat not so high road facts of life. The organizations most devoted to having us store our guns in a safe in one end of the house, and the ammunition in a safe in the basement are organizations devoted to taking guns away from all citizens.
The idea is:
guns locked up away from ammo, home is invaded friday night, and because guns locked up, the home owners are unable to defend themselves and thus the following tuesday morning the defenseless homeowners are found tortured to death. Thus proving to the anti gun org that firearm in house does not equal protection THUS their belief in not having a gun is reinforced on the basis of "they couldnt get to their gun so whats the point of owning one?"

SomeKid
May 6, 2008, 09:31 PM
Post #5 Everyone = obvious antis like the news, my son's pediatrician, some family members not inside my immediately family, etc...

Brock,

The antis opinion is the opinion of people who know nothing about guns. People who know nothing have an opinion that is worth nothing.

You need a new pediatrician. Why? Because they should give pediatric medical advice, that is their specialty. They are not specialists in guns. Their inability to understand this probably means they aren't very good at their supposedly chosen profession. If you think this sounds absurd, then I want to ask: Would you take medical advice from the kid behind the counter at a gun store?

Lastly, are those some members of your family gunnies, fudds, or anti?

Infidel Cowboy
May 6, 2008, 11:25 PM
My son is about to turn 5. When he was 1, he could take the batteries out of the remote and replace them properly. When he was 2, because he so badly wanted to see what Daddy was doing, I let him watch as I installed a hard wired night light in his bedroom. Two nights later, I went to check on him just in time to see that he had removed the face plate with a piece of a Happy Meal toy he had broken to use as a screwdriver. We had to turn the power to his room off at the breaker for three weeks at night. Just after turning 4, he successfully updated the Flash player on my desktop PC while playing on Noggin.com. He no longer has admin rights. He knows how to get from my house to his mom's, to the grocery store, the vet and the park. He won't admit that he can read, but he can start the car - and tells me when I'm speeding. He can carry a gallon of milk up 3 flights of stairs and uses his bat to move the couch when the cat won't come out. I have no idea where the little devil gets his sense for mischief!! :D But, if you think for one second that I trust in his inability to get to or figure out and operate a firearm, you are out of your mind.

If it's not on me, it's locked up.

Never, never underestimate the enemy.

IC

hankdatank1362
May 6, 2008, 11:41 PM
On me at all times, except for bedtime. Then, it's locked up. Handguns go in one safe, rifles in another. Handguns are stored empty with mags beside them. Rifles and shotguns are stored "cruiser ready", with extra mags laying on top of the handgun safe... in case I start to see zombies or need to unleash Hell on a bunch of gangbangers.

Between you and me, If a BG ever makes his way into our house at night, since my 3 year old sleeps in our bed (BTW... bad habit to start) and not in his room, once I've made sure it's a bad guy, I'm just gonna lock the bedroom door and let a bunch of FMJ steel core commie 7.62x39 rip through through the house. I can always transition to a pistol after I run dry of loaded mags (keep at least 4 loaded at all times)

SoCalShooter
May 6, 2008, 11:46 PM
I lock my XD 45 up and my mossberg 500 up in the morning when I leave the house and I just get them out of the safe before I enter the house (odd I know but the safe is in the garage and its part of the house but still far enough that no intruder would notice me entering)

jaytex1969
May 8, 2008, 07:03 AM
Just do like my parents did. Lock the children in the safe and then you can leave your toys lying about...

Just kidding, of course. We don't have kids, but I keep everything locked up except my little bedside buddy at night. The RSC I started out with is now the ammo depot and the boomsticks are all in a real safe. Although we have no kids, there still plenty of ornery ones strolling the streets with nothing constructive to do while we're away at work.

woodybrighton
May 8, 2008, 07:52 AM
if its out of arms reach its not secure :mad:
your kids maybe safe around guns can you be sure all there friends will be :confused:
true most safes can be broken fact.
but most burglars are not that professional

another okie
May 8, 2008, 08:05 AM
The effort of locking them is small, the downside of not doing it is huge. I keep my self-defense pistol in a quick access safe by the bed. All the rest are in a good solid safe. When I'm home and no kids or other adults are around I open the big safe so the AR and shotgun are accessible.

ImARugerFan
May 8, 2008, 08:28 AM
No loaded guns when there's kids around. It's that simple. Get a quick access safe and have a loaded clip in there with the gun. Mossberg also makes a nice rack with a lock on it for storing your shotgun.

hso
May 8, 2008, 09:54 AM
Just search THR for discussions on guns and kids and you'll find lots of advice.

jackstinson
May 8, 2008, 12:04 PM
Mine are all safely buried in the backyard when I am not using them. ;)
Plus, my youngest "kid" is 25 and lives 2400 miles from home.

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