Trigger Taurus revolver?


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280PLUS
May 6, 2008, 06:30 PM
Have to make this quick. I just bought a Taurus 941 in .22 mag. Is there an way to improve that trigger. I don't want to use the word "sucks" but I could.

:D

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corncob
May 6, 2008, 07:50 PM
My sister got a M94 (22 lr) used with a better trigger than these have from the factory. Trouble is, it had 1 or 2 light strikes per cylinder. I cracked it open to find springs with splash of red paint--I assume this was the Wolfe spring kit available for this gun all over the internet.

I shimmed the lighter-weight mainspring until it was just short of solid at full cock (about 3/16-in) and all has been good since. I was in a hurry and used a drilled-out hex jamb nut of unknown size, which I am not proud of, but I'm quite sure it will work forever and no one will ever know.

I think I recall also flushing out a lot of gritty crud and re-lubing the innards as well. No wonder this one turned up in the "used" case.

After this treatment, I would say the trigger is ~85% as good as a S&W--still a bit of creep in SA.


If you go this route, remember 3 things:

1. Buy the correct screwdriver or do what I did and make one with a coarse file and a cheap bit.
2. Remove the side plate by holding the gun side-plate-up and striking the frame with the handle of a screwdriver in the downward direction. Isaac Newton will hold the side plate still for you while the gun moves down.
3. Don't disturb the innards. They are a puzzle you don't want to have to solve.

280PLUS
May 6, 2008, 08:49 PM
Well. I did open it and clean out the crud you mention. I also removed the mainspring and nipped off about 2 turns. Definite improvement, no light strikes yet. Still it feels awful crunchy in there and I've also had it do some kind of crazy lock up thing here and there if the cylinder is between chambers. Very weird. It's new, I'm going to shoot it a bit and see if it improves. I'm not impressed with the finish work though. There's still filings left on the face of the breech where they filed it off square. it ain't no $800 S&W that's for sure... :rolleyes:

:p

corncob
May 6, 2008, 08:59 PM
Amen to that. I suspect a good bit of shooting followed by another flush will smooth things out quite a bit.

280PLUS
May 6, 2008, 10:51 PM
Cool, thanks for your help!

:D

MrTuffPaws
May 7, 2008, 12:38 AM
Any new Taurus revolver needs to have the side plate popped and flush the innards with a good shot of CLP and let drain dry.

New springs will also help.

mnrivrat
May 7, 2008, 04:27 AM
This is an 8 shot revolver - the mechanics and leverage required is different than for the J frame S&W .22's in 6 shot so don't expect to get a totaly nice DA trigger pull out of this gun.

Clipping main spring is not a great idea - trigger return spring can be lightened a little to help - honing/polishig of the proper nature can also help, but just shoot the crap out of it for awhile and it will smooth up also.

mainmech48
May 7, 2008, 02:33 PM
Mostly ditto what mnrivrat said. Rather than clipping any of the stock springs it's a better idea to get one of the kits from Brownell's and do a little testing to find out which combo gives you the best reliability of ignition and trigger return with the most improvement in pull weight. It's cheap, and you're not going to render your revolver unservicable if you goof.

FWIW, I found that the trigger return spring was responsible for most of the excess in my M94. The difference between the stock and replacement hammer springs is only 2 lbs (stock=11#; Wolff=9#). The stock return spring is rated as 14# while the Wolff replacements are 9# and 6.5#.

I got 100% functional reliability and a huge improvement in DA pull using the stock mainspring and the 9# return. The kit was only $10.50.

I'd also agree with the suggestion to do a good deal of shooting before you start polishing on things. IMO it takes at least several hundred rounds to generate enough wear to identify where the parts might actually be rubbing against something else enough to make a real difference.

Again just MO, but if they don't include adjustments to timing or fitting issues most "action jobs" consist of adding what amounts to artificial wear to contact surfaces, with or without replacing or altering springs.

Good lubricants and a couple of thousand rds will usually smooth things up very nicely. It just takes a while.

280PLUS
May 7, 2008, 03:28 PM
Thank you all. Points well taken. I did nip the spring just a bit with the knowledge that I could end up buying another one. I'll look into the Brownell stuff after I shoot it for a while. Please forward any extra or unwanted .22 mag ammo to... :)

tblt
May 7, 2008, 04:08 PM
Corncob I did the same thing with my RG model 39 main spring ,do to light primer strikes.I't worked for a little while now 1 or 2 out of 6 fail to fire.I did not compress all the way just found a ss hex nut in the garage and used it.

BryanP
May 8, 2008, 10:49 AM
FWIW, I found that the trigger return spring was responsible for most of the excess in my M94. The difference between the stock and replacement hammer springs is only 2 lbs (stock=11#; Wolff=9#). The stock return spring is rated as 14# while the Wolff replacements are 9# and 6.5#.

I've considered doing this, but I've been deterred by the phrase "(Not recommended for 94/941)" on their web site.

mainmech48
May 8, 2008, 01:18 PM
The kit I bought was from Brownell's. Whether it was put together by Wolff or their own tech people, I don't know for sure. It's listed as "Wolff Taurus 73, 85 & 94 Shooters Pak". What I can tell you for sure is that it worked out very well in my M94.

It was essentially a drop-in job, but there was a good deal of experimenting necessary to determine which combo worked best in my revolver. As I said, that turned out to be using the factory mainspring and the 9# return. With those I get 100% reliable trigger return and as close to that in ignition reliabilty as one can reasonably expect with a RF revolver. FWIW, all but one of the vanishingly few FsTF I've experienced would not fire upon a second-strike nor when tried in another weapon, which leads me to conclude that they were entirely ammo-related.

With .22 RF ammo having arguably the widest distribution and the most extreme variation spreads in quality and consistency of manufacture in the world it's easy to understand why the "utility" models from most makers come with the spring rates engineered to try and ensure reliable function under the widest possible range of usage conditions.

Taurus sells a very large portion of its products domesticly (Brazil) and in other portions of the world in markets where extremely "hostile" environmental conditions, marginal ammo and negligable maintenance are the norm rather than the exception.

Their engineering on these models reflects that, IMO. The bias seems to be heavily towards "robustness" and durability, trying to ensure that the rifle, pistol or revolver they sell will have the best chance of performing its basic functions when called upon even if it's being fed very poor quality ammo and subjected to what we'd see as horrible neglect or downright abuse.

All I've done is basically reduced the amount of built-in compensation to suit my circumstances and tastes better.

If you still have some misgivings Bryan, give the tech line folks at Brownell's a call. They're knowledgable, experienced an extremely helpfull.

Biff
May 9, 2008, 12:18 PM
.22 mag revolvers are notorious for heavy DA triggers. The reason is that the .22 magnum cartridge operates at higher pressure than the .22LR. The cases are made heavier to stand up to the pressure. Because it is a rimfire, heavier case equals tougher primer. It takes a heavier mainspring to fire the magnum rimfire than the shorter cartridges.

280PLUS
May 10, 2008, 09:26 AM
I'm still here,,,

Just reading along, thanks for all the input!

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