Dillon 550B and powder check system possible ?


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koulikov
May 11, 2008, 08:13 PM
Hi,
I wish to know if there is a way to have a powder check system on that wonderful 550 ? The Dillon 650 is really too much expensive just for adding a powder check.

Maybe someone can recommand me another press ? I want around the same price of the 550 and easy to switch with others calibers.

Thanks for your advices.

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pinkymingeo
May 11, 2008, 08:17 PM
That one's easy. The Hornady LnL AP has quick caliber changes, lightning-fast primer changes, five stations so you can use a powder check die, is auto-indexing and loads as fast as a 650 but, net of the free bullet offer, costs less than a 550. For me the choice was a no-brainer.

Quigley_Sharps
May 11, 2008, 08:21 PM
net of the free bullet offer :confused:

pinkymingeo
May 11, 2008, 09:22 PM
I'll add that Dillon makes top-notch stuff. Nobody seriously knocks it, or should, anyway. The 550 has a large, loyal following that I'm sure it deserves. When I mention an alternative I'm not suggesting that one press is superior to another. For somebody looking for a five station press, with auto-indexing a plus, the LnL has some great features at a price that makes it attractive. Dillon has great features too. They're all good.

DEDON45
May 11, 2008, 09:26 PM
The LnL is a good choice.. there is also an offer of 1000 free bullets with the pressy right now that defrays much of the cost. Only thing comparable would be the Dillon XL650 (progressive with 5 stations). I like mine.

GaryL
May 11, 2008, 10:53 PM
The 550 has a large, loyal following that I'm sure it deserves. True dat.
Although I have a 550b, I still suggest people consider the Hornady when looking for a progressive. That 1000 bullet offer is tough to ignore.

I do feel the 550's manual indexing is an advantage for a general purpose progressive, as it is easy to use it like a single station press when the situation warrants it.

Having choices is a wonderful thing.

lgbloader
May 11, 2008, 11:45 PM
I am looking into possibly adding another progressive to my bench and keep coming back to the same thing. that 550b would be perfect for MY situation. But I would be looking for something in between my single stage presses and my XL650's. If I only had a single stage and was looking into buying just one press with a powder check die/station, My choice would be either the Dillon XL650 or the Hornady Lock/Load AP. But there are other factors...the main one for me would be this:

1. How many different calibers?
If it is just one caliber or calibers with the same size primer, then go with the XL650. Hard to beat it.
If your will need to change calibers and primers, maybe the Hornady might be the way to go since I have heard that changing calibers/primers is very quick compared to the XL650.

They are both very exellent machines. I prefer the Dillons but for my own reasons.

* * but only if you purchase the case feeders for either choice, otherwise, the Dillon 550b all the way. This little workhorse is really hard to beat. Here's why:

I have two XL650's both equiped with Powder check systems/dies in station 3 and lights mounted on the press to illuminate the shell plate but for what it is worth, I STILL LOOK INTO EVERY CASE BEFORE I SEAT THE BULLET. If something don't look right, I will pull that brass off of the press and inspect/check/verify all pertinant details. I know I could probably set records in terms of how many rounds per minute or how fast I could load 100 rounds but my usual time of 15 minutes per 100 being very careful is fast enough.

That said, the 550b looks even better.

Cheers, Mate

koulikov
May 12, 2008, 08:18 AM
Difficult choice but I think I will go for the Hornady LNL.

I have see the Dillon XL650 and 1050 in action. Very good press but it take more time to switch between different caliber.
Another thing, I have read that the Hornady powder system is more accurate.

freakshow10mm
May 12, 2008, 08:53 AM
The powder check system is not needed, especially on the 550. Here's why:

Look into the case in station 2 to make sure the powder level is correct before seating a bullet. Your eyes are your powder check system and they are free.

If you are using a powder that meters well, your variance should be .1gr or so in a run. If you aren't using max loads, don't worry about it.

If you have a hard on for the powder check system, move the seating die to station 4, put the check in station 3. Make sure your seater die also has a crimping function. I don't think Dillon dies do.

koulikov
May 12, 2008, 02:30 PM
I have contact Dillon and they said it's not possible on the 550.

With most pistol case I undersand it's easy to control but with rifle bottleneck case I prefer a powder check system.

I have a look in Dillon, RCBS and Hornady dies in a catalog and I didn't find any seat and crimp all-in-one.

freakshow10mm
May 12, 2008, 03:46 PM
All seater dies but the Dillon have a built in crimper.

lgbloader
May 12, 2008, 07:55 PM
With most pistol case I undersand it's easy to control but with rifle bottleneck case I prefer a powder check system.


I would'nt load rifle bottleneck cases progressive. I load mine 'ala single stage' to be nice and intimate. It makes me pulling that trigger a little less frightful, you know what I mean. But that's only my take. I am sure that there are people who think it is perfectly safe. Just like swimming in a cage with Great Whites in the water. I'll watch from a safe distance, from another boat! Sorry Mate, that was a bit dramatic.

Cheers, Mate

45ACPUSER
May 12, 2008, 09:33 PM
All seater dies but the Dillon have a built in crimper.
The Pro Series from Redding do not have crimping ability, nor do the Competition Seater dies.....
No matter the reasoning, I firmly believe that seating and crimping is worthless unless you have uniform case lengths......so it is best to seat in one step and crimp in another. Yeah I know you can, but it does not mean it is the best way to reload!

freakshow10mm
May 12, 2008, 09:35 PM
Oh, yeah, those too.

DEDON45
May 12, 2008, 11:21 PM
And, as my recent experience has shown, if you buy (mine are new) Hornady dies for .45ACP, the built in crimper is a roll crimp (I suspect the same is true for any of the other common auto-pistol rounds like the 9mm and .40, etc. that headspace on the case mouth)... you need a separate taper crimp die (I bought a Hornady one) for that one ... there's enough stations in a LnL when you use a Powder Thru expander (fits in the powder die, freeing up a station and replaces a separate expander die) to have the separate crimp station and a powder check station... the best of all worlds.

BigJakeJ1s
May 13, 2008, 09:59 PM
The Hornady 454 die set has the same seat/crimp die as 45 colt, 45 schofield, and 45 acp. I have been able to use it for either roll or taper crimp, based on how I set it up. It starts with a taper, then transitions to a roll crimp, but there's not much adjustment in between. So if you don't keep your brass at uniform length, it might be difficult to taper crimp consistently with it.

Andy

jlficken
May 14, 2008, 10:45 AM
For .223 on my 550B I use H335 which meters +/- .1gr consistently. I would not use Varget in the Dillon powder measure. After loading I shake each cartridge and verify (by sound/feel) that there is powder in each case. Is it a perfect method...no, however, it works for me.

freakshow10mm
May 14, 2008, 11:06 AM
I use Varget in .223, 375 H&H, and 45/70 on my 550. Look in the case before you seat a bullet and you are good to go. Varget also meters very well.

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