.22-250 versus .243


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Auburn1992
May 14, 2008, 11:32 PM
Right now I am looking at the Remington 700 VLS at Sportsmans Ware house. As of last week when I went looking, they had a .204, .22-250, .223, and one chambered in .243. The two I was really interested in was the .22-250 & .243. I wouldn't go .223 because I will eventually get an AR-15 and want some "caliber diversity".

The .22-250 is priced at $680 (or $720 I can't remember); and the .243 is on sale right now for only $650. When I saw that I thought it was a good deal but wasn't too sure.

The problem I have now is which to get. This will not be used for deer hunting as I already have a .30-30 & 7mm-08 suited for that. It will mainly be used for target shooting (up to 300 yards). I'm thinking 22-250 so I can round off my cartridges because I do not have a small caliber centerfire.

Which would you take, and what would be a good ammo choice for paper punching? I was thinking Winchester Ballistic Silvertip for target ammo.

What kind of groupings do you think I could expect with this rifle? Would I be better off taking an AR15 instead if the accuracy of the VLS isn't so great? Or, would I be better off spending the extra $100 to buy the Rem XR-100?

Thanks,

Auburn

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Fumbler
May 14, 2008, 11:52 PM
I'd take the 243 because I own a 308 and handload.
You can neck down 260, 7mm-08, and 308 brass down to 243. Also, 243 bullets tend to have better ballistic coefficients that should give you much better long range accuracy.

But, you're only shooting out to 300 yards. At that range it won't matter much.
It also doesn't sound like you reload, so you're stuck with factory ammo anyway.

Do a search on moly coated bullets before you decide to buy those ballistic silvertips...
Some good factory paper punching ammo would be loaded with regular ballistic tips or v-max. I am not aware of anyone offering a boat tail hollowpoint (which are often best) in 22-250.

You should expect consistent 1MOA out of the rifle after you find the factory ammo that it likes most.

Honestly if I were you, I'd get the 223 (as long as it wasn't a slow twist barrel).
Good factory match ammo is readily available for 223 and plinking ammo is much cheaper.

Really what I think you need to do is start handloading. You may never reach a rifle's full accuracy potential without handloading.
And, the number of different loads you make for different applications will be vastly larger than factory offerings.
Not to mention it's cheaper than buying overpriced inaccurate factory ammo...

rangerruck
May 15, 2008, 12:55 AM
I would get it in 243, a great round, can shoot out to 1000 yds if need be, also , I would bet one of the cheap fodder rounds , factory 243, will shoot very nice. Mine loves factory plane jane federal 100 grain fmj's , sub moa with it. For hunting purposes, I dropped a nice piggy with mine, while my partner with a 22.250 , thumped one at about 100 yds, but it still ran off.

rangerruck
May 15, 2008, 12:56 AM
plus , if you reload, you now have common brass with the 7.08...

Tarvis
May 15, 2008, 01:23 AM
I suggest you get a rifle in a bench rest cartridge if you're only going to be punching paper. However, for the sake of the question at hand, I'd say it's pretty much a wash at 300 yards for paper, aside from ammo cost which I have no experience on; I haven't bought loaded rifle ammo for 2 years. If I had to pick one I'd probably say get the 243, then buy the 22-250 when it goes on sale ;).

, can shoot out to 1000 yds

There are many cartridges that can go 1000 yards, the difference is if it will hit the target on the first shot or not.

while my partner with a 22.250 , thumped one at about 100 yds, but it still ran off.

Could have something to do with shot placement or bullet weight.

eflatminor
May 15, 2008, 01:27 AM
The 22-250, in my experience, is MUCH more finicky with ammo than the .243. Sounds like you're not reloading (bet you do eventually) but it can take a long time to find the right combination of powder, bullet and OAL to get the most out of the 22-250. Lots of trial and error. The .243 is much easier to load.

Art Eatman
May 15, 2008, 12:40 PM
Given your present arsenal, I guess I'd recommend the .22-250. I agree with many of the caveats given above, however.

IMO, whether .22-250 or .243, get started reloading. You'll do much better, overall, if you can tailor your ammo to your rifle...

Art

tinygnat219
May 15, 2008, 12:57 PM
Are you going to use the 22-250 for hunting?

If so, make sure the .22-250 can be used to hunt with in the state you are in. In VA for example, it's illegal to hunt deer with.

digisol
February 27, 2010, 11:47 PM
I've seen foxes with no heads after taken out with 22:250 at 250+ yds, the only down side is barrel throat erosion at around 1,200 rds +/-, if you shoot a lot and at larger game the 22:250 can then have problems dropping the larger game, the hot 22:250 is a great varmint round but that's what its made for.

The 243 is a very good general purpose round but is also limited to a 60 - 100g bullet weight, I always looked at the 243 as a small 308, and shoot it accordingly, the 25:06 is worth a look at those long range ballistic tables when loaded with 120g pills, and its not to be ignored, but having a 243 in your safe is a handy rifle, you must work on the expected game and bullet weight.

Seems in the US you have different rules on calibre to game, so another factor to pencil in on your choice, my favourite rifle is the 7mm RM, it don't matter what the game or range, just line it up and kill it.

Picher
February 28, 2010, 09:20 AM
The .22-250 is a great varmint round. Anyone who wants to shoot varmints between 50 and 350 yards should own one. Closer than 50 yards, a .22 LR will suffice for almost any varmints, farther than 350, a .243 to .25-06 will be better, especially on larger varmints.

Wind is the worst problem for long-range varminters. The .243 has the edge there, especially with 85-90 grain bullets. Recoil, barrel heating, and noise are factors when shooting the .243. The .223 is a fun cartridge also, but generally better under 250 yards, IMHO.

The question is, "Do I want a great varmint cartridge, or a great range/plinking cartridge." The .22-250 is best for dual use. Accuracy is close to the .223, but it falls a bit short in wind deflection to the .243.

I own both .223 and .22-250. Each has a place in my varmint/range battery, but neither goes deer hunting.

Gordon
February 28, 2010, 11:59 AM
I wishRemington would wise up nd offer a 22-250 with a 1-8" or 1-9" twist. Then load those 80 grain + low drag bullets in them! A good 80 grain Deer load would be nice too.

jmortimer
February 28, 2010, 12:19 PM
The .243 is a fine caliber. It falls into the "do it all" gun category. With a 100 grain partitions there are few game animals it cannot take. For long range shooting it is a pleasure with little recoil. It just makes so much sense on so many levels.

joed
February 28, 2010, 12:41 PM
I wishRemington would wise up nd offer a 22-250 with a 1-8" or 1-9" twist. Then load those 80 grain + low drag bullets in them! A good 80 grain Deer load would be nice too.

I hope that never happens. In my opinion the .223 should never have been tortured to shoot anything heavier the 65 gr. The .223 rifle I bought has such a long throat the rifle won't shoot 55 gr bullets accurately.

What's next, the .223 shooting 200 gr bullets with a 1:3 twist. It's getting ridiculous.

natman
February 28, 2010, 01:22 PM
If all you want to do is punch paper get a 223. Ammo is a LOT cheaper, it's much easier on barrels than a 22-250 and it will drive clean through a target, even at 300 yards.

Art Eatman
February 28, 2010, 01:28 PM
You guys reckon that maybe Mr. Auburn's already bought his rifle? Back in 2008?

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