Dry Firing my new Springfield 1911?


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dubious
May 22, 2008, 03:38 AM
I'm assuming its a bad idea, but it's such good practice. Can I dry fire my NIB Stainless Loaded Springfield 1911? I should probably just buy some snap caps, right? Ruger says you can dry fire any of their guns... but obviously this ain't no Ruger. I'd be concerned about dry firing a Ruger .22 even still.

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CWL
May 22, 2008, 04:17 AM
Dry-firing is great trigger practice.

Without a solid contact to the firing pin, it may be possible for the firing pin to push out the firing-pin hole in the slide and potentially cause slamfires.

Just buy some snap caps and stop all the worrying. If you can't wait, make your own by pulling the caps and pouring some silicone into the gap.

2nd 41
May 22, 2008, 10:25 AM
Is there anything in the Manual about dry firing?
Enjoy your new Loaded. Let us know how it's going.

atomemphis
May 22, 2008, 11:00 AM
Just say no to dry firing rimfire guns. The firing pin can slam into the top o' the barrel, or other things, given its point of impact.

This could weaken the firing pin to the point of wear or failure after repetition.

It escapes me why people think dry firing a centerfire handgun is 'bad'. Perhaps it is my Mechanical Engineering background.

The firing pin moves forward and contacts nothing, so there is no wear. The hammer strikes the pin, and the pin moves just as it would when actual firing occurs. The firing pin spring absorbs the impact, just as normal function.

If dry-firing a centerfire handgun is bad, then so is firing a centerfire handgun.

The only possible aspects of wear is repeated compression of the mainspring by cocking the hammer (same as regular firing), and similar compression of the firing pin spring (again, same as regular firing). The hammer hitting the firing pin, and thus the back of the slide, produces minimal wear (if your hammer fails doing that, it was going to fail during actual firing) and the wear is no different from actual firing.

Dry firing is a good way to practice target acquisition and trigger control. It gives you an opportunity to really get to know your firearm, and where the trigger take-up ends, as well as if there is creep, over-travel, etc.

Again: Rimfire dry-firing = bad. Centerfire dry-firing = not bad.

Any other information passed on is urban legend or repeated misinformation.

fletcher
May 22, 2008, 11:25 AM
^ I believe CZ-52s had problems where dry-firing could result in breaking of the firing pin, so there may be other forces at work in certain centerfire handguns. Perhaps if the pin is tapered, and the spring is only there to return it to position (and not soak up all the force), then if there is no primer in the way to stop the movement, the edges could impact around the bore and wear on the pin.


I dry fire my Springfield 1911 a good bit without snap caps, and it still goes bang every time.

FlyinBryan
May 22, 2008, 11:39 AM
actually the worry comes from the firing pin shoulder striking the rear of the breech face without the added deceleration supplied by the primer and subsequent ignition.

on the bright side, 1911s are very tolerant of this


edit: pretty much like fletcher said

Cougfan2
May 22, 2008, 11:48 AM
Dry fire away. I practice quick close quarters target accquisition by dry firing almost every day and my Springer and my DW 1911 still go bang every time.

AirForceShooter
May 22, 2008, 12:02 PM
Springfield will tell you dry firing a 1911 is fine.
Personally, I use snap caps. I just feel better about it.

AFS

Blakenzy
May 22, 2008, 12:08 PM
Buy a set of Wolff extra power firing pin springs and just do it. Change out the springs if you notice they get noticeably weak (if that ever happens at all) and you'll be fine. Spring wear(maybe) and good trigger pull skills(definitely) is all I think that can result from dry firing your springer.

possum
May 22, 2008, 12:15 PM
i don't use snap caps and i dry fir 3-5 times as much as i actually shoot live rds , that is in my 1911 my xd's all my handguns.

Black Majik
May 22, 2008, 12:38 PM
I dryfire my 1911s a lot without snapcaps too, even though I have snapcaps around somewhere. If you don't have snapcaps available, you can also use the foam earplugs to put between the hammer and firing pin.

Email the guys at Dryfire@grayguns.com and dryfire away! :D

Phil DeGraves
May 22, 2008, 12:51 PM
Inserting snap caps isn't to protect the firing pin; it's to make sure that there is no live ammo in the gun before you "dry" fire.

JesseL
May 22, 2008, 01:15 PM
Inserting snap caps isn't to protect the firing pin; it's to make sure that there is no live ammo in the gun before you "dry" fire.

So why do they have the little cushion in the primer location, rather than just being empty right there?

fletcher
May 22, 2008, 01:17 PM
Inserting snap caps isn't to protect the firing pin; it's to make sure that there is no live ammo in the gun before you "dry" fire.
I understand it's mainly for protection of the firing pin, and can be used for all sorts of things like practice/demonstration with dummy rounds (mag changes, malfunction clearing, etc.).


From A-Zoom/Pachmyr sites:
The highly durable dry fire “Dead Cap” can take over three thousand dry fires while protecting the firing pin.
Snap Caps allow safe dry firing while protecting firing pin, sear and trigger

CWL
May 22, 2008, 02:15 PM
Inserting snap caps isn't to protect the firing pin; it's to make sure that there is no live ammo in the gun before you "dry" fire.
Snap caps serve a purpose by decellerating and absorbing the energy of the firing pin and spring. This is better than letting a pin slam into the breech face of the slide, potentially enlarging this opening (slamfires) and from possible damaging the pin itself.

Ske1etor
May 22, 2008, 02:54 PM
In a 1911 the firing pin does not contact the breech face unless the spring is removed. If the spring is in place, this will not happen. (Unless the firing pin spring is severely worn, or modified)Take a look at your firing pin. Do you realize how far it would have to travel forward to contact the rear of the breech face? Especially the shoulder of the firing pin.

It doesn't hurt, and A-zoom is in the snap cap business. Of course they are going to tell you that their product is doing a good thing.

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