Brinks Home Security Comercial


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PawDaddy
August 20, 2003, 02:54 PM
How many have seen the Brinks ad where the woman and her children are home alone when someone tries to break in. As soon as the BG breaks the window the alarm sounds and he runs away. The lady and children run upstairs and the Brinks guy calls and says that he is going to call the police. The police arrive and everything is okay.

How many people really buy this garbage?

I believe that in a real situation such as this, the woman and kids would never make it up the stairs because the BG would come on in and get them.

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Moparmike
August 20, 2003, 02:58 PM
Well, in the right circumstances the family would get up the stairs, but the BG would be close behind. Never underestimate the power of luck. (or The Force. Or the Schwartz.)

To make this gun related, the BG would ideally get to the bedroom door to be blasted away by 00buck coming from a mom-wielded 12-guage. Ideally.

FJC
August 20, 2003, 03:08 PM
It depends.

All security provides "layers." Each layer deters another level of criminal. Lighting may turn away some of those that plan to invade a home , then a locked door a few more of those that passed the first layer, a very high quality lock more, an alarm company sticker a few more, a barking dog a few more, etc, etc.

A sounding alarm is just another one of those layers.

I have no doubts that an alarm sounding would cause at least some percentage of criminals to flee immediately. Back when I was a reserve deputy sheriff I saw many homes where someone pried open a door or window, then apparently fled when the alarm sounded.

Of course one should be prepared to defend themselves if those other layers fail. :)

spacemanspiff
August 20, 2003, 03:08 PM
remember that scene in 'the others' where nicole kidmans character pulls the double barrel from a chest? that was great. i dont like kidman but that scene gave me a tingly warm feeling.

watched 'dark blue' last night. seeing sargaent beth loading the pistol grip pump gave me a similar feeling.

Skunkabilly
August 20, 2003, 03:12 PM
i dont like kidman but that scene gave me a tingly warm feeling.

She was holding that sucker by the barrel, I'm sure she had more than a tingly warm feeling :eek:

Yes, people actually believe that crap. I used to live with several :rolleyes:

TheFederalistWeasel
August 20, 2003, 03:15 PM
This, as more and more departments slowly refuse to answer burglar alarm calls due to the shear volume of false alarms.

In five years as a patrol deputy there is absolutely no telling how many calls I responded to for panic alarms, burglar alarms, motion alarms, both commercial as well as residential.

Possibly in the thousands and guess how many were real, legitimate alarms?

None, not a single one.

Most were the result of weather, animals, and faulty systems or on rare occasions some poor guy who was showing up for work and forgot his code or couldn’t get to the alarm keypad in time.

I place burglar alarms in the same category as car alarms, just how many of you pay any attention to a car alarm going off in a crowded parking lot on a sunny Saturday afternoon at the mall?

They’re worthless, get yourself a nice gauge, load that puppy up with 00B and keep it handy, best damn burglar alarm money can buy!

cool45auto
August 20, 2003, 03:15 PM
In a perfect world the mom would have shoved the kids behind her then "Mozambiqued" his butt!:p

Jake
August 20, 2003, 03:17 PM
But if it's on TV it must be true. Right?

PawDaddy
August 20, 2003, 03:28 PM
I believe that these types of things give people a false sense of security.

A police officer may not always be available to come to one's rescue and shouldn't be counted on to do so. Someone on the phone line is not very much help either when someone is knocking down your door.

C.R.Sam
August 20, 2003, 03:38 PM
What FJC and The Federalist Weasel said.

Sam

RTFM
August 20, 2003, 03:45 PM
The part that gets me is that they had to call her to tell her that they were going to call the police for her....L-A-M-E!!!

She should be 9-1-1-ing as she was going up the stairs.

I know, I know if the poor defenseless woman had thought for herself, then Brinks would be out the air time for the commerical...

Now we need an Oleg Volk sponsored commercial.
B.G. Brakes window.
Armed Female (played by R.O.T.L.:D ) Draws, Fires, calls 9-1-1 to request ambulance of bad guy bleeding and incapacitated in her kitchen.
Hangs up phone.
Fade to black.
26 extra seconds of light music for the viewer to contemplate the correct use of deadly force to protect her family by, in the 30 second commercial.

kudu
August 20, 2003, 03:53 PM
RTFM
As a sheeple she probably didn't know the number for 9-1-1 to call the police. :D :rolleyes:

Preacherman
August 20, 2003, 04:19 PM
How's this for a scenario?

December, 2003. The THR moderators are gathered at Byron's place in Georgia (this is already planned).

Gang of BG's break down front door and enter, screaming "We're gonna git you, suckas!"

Sound of multiple handguns, rifles and shotguns being fired extremely rapidly, very accurately.

Subdued moans from last of BG's expiring on floor.

Sheriff's deputies arrive, only to be met by about 20 gun-wielding mods, all smiling and saying "No, sir, there's really no problem at all... and no, we didn't have an alarm system - we didn't think we needed one!"



:evil: :p :D

Mark Tyson
August 20, 2003, 04:24 PM
An alarm, like a gun, is only one component of a larger home defense system.

Country Boy
August 20, 2003, 05:33 PM
I think my wife has gotten sick of me explaining how the situation would be handled at our place!

Shooter973
August 20, 2003, 10:56 PM
Another thing that the Brinks commercial doesn't cover is that if the phone line is cut NO ALARM. The second thing you don't see is the family dog come rocketing out from under the table and head for the BG, barking and snarling like a banshee! :cuss: :banghead:

Remander
August 20, 2003, 11:40 PM
I was just laughing with my wife tonight about how the Brinks operator on TV calls the lady and, breathlessly, as if such alarms were very rare, begs to know if everything is okay.

With so many false alarms, I somehow doubt the Brinks operators get that jacked up when an alarm sounds.

They probably have to get out the office manual to look up what to do for the one-in-a-million call where someone says: "NO!!! We're freaking under attack here!"

Holy cow! That's a first! What's the number for 911?

Marcus
August 21, 2003, 12:01 AM
Wow,I feel so much better knowing I`m not the only one who rants about that stupid commercial every time it comes on! My wife`s so sick of it she`s ready to assault me herself! :uhoh: Marcus

Parker Dean
August 21, 2003, 12:22 AM
Originally posted by TheFederalistWeasel
In five years as a patrol deputy there is absolutely no telling how many calls I responded to for panic alarms, burglar alarms, motion alarms, both commercial as well as residential.

Possibly in the thousands and guess how many were real, legitimate alarms?

None, not a single one.

Most were the result of weather, animals, and faulty systems or on rare occasions some poor guy who was showing up for work and forgot his code or couldn’t get to the alarm keypad in time.

Reminds me of the time about a decade ago that I was asked to go to a friends new apartment to get an item that was supposed to be "just right there."

For whatever reason my attempt to disarm the alarm must not have worked even though I didn't hear any alarm or warning beeps.

Anyway I had to rummage around the apartment for about five minutes before finding the item in question and leaving the apartment after doing the alarm-set procedure. I hop in my 67 Mustang and drive out of the parking lot. As I'm leaving a cop car is pulling in from the left while I'm going right I get a couple of hundred feet down the road and here's another cop going towards the complex. In the rear view I see he turns in too.

I'm thinking "Naw. Couldn't be. I disarmed that thing" but I whip it around and go back to the complex. Sure enough a cop car is sitting out front of the apartment and the second one is close to the entrance. I approach the one at the entrance and pull up to his drivers door. He rolls down the window and I ask if he's there for an alarm at apartment whatever-it-was. He answers yes, and I say something along the lines of "sorry that was me." He says "Ok, I'll take care of it." I say thanks and drive off.

He never asked my name, what I had been doing, nothing. So yeah they really cared, huh? :D

pittspilot
August 21, 2003, 12:39 AM
Well, I am also glad that I am not the only person who yells about the lack of other security components in that commercial to my wife.

I have nothing against alarms, but they are not the be all end all that Brinks make them out to be. As others have said, they can be a good component of a security system.

coldshot03/04
August 21, 2003, 12:50 AM
I know of a family that has Brinks. Their house was broken into and it took the cops 2 hours to get there. He said that the call or alarm went off, the security co. was contacted via the alarm system, they called 911 with the wrong info, address and wrong county. About 2 hours later here came the cops. Duh!!!:eek: Good thing that he owns Pit Bulls.:rolleyes:

Josey
August 21, 2003, 12:56 AM
Hey A true story. A few years ago my agency had a major TC with an officer involved. Cruiser flipped, officer trapped inside and secondary TC also. The CLEO put out a directive that PD would NOT respond to any residential alarms. A private "armed response" security company took over all residential alarm responses. One night I was sitting in my cruiser when the armed response dispatcher gives a call to their SG. We kept sitting. I asked him if he was going to respond. His answer was classic. No, if it is real I will give the BG 10 minutes to take off. If it is false, it will reset in 10 minutes.

4 eyed six shooter
August 21, 2003, 01:26 AM
My wife just turns the channel when the Brinks ad or any number of other useless crap come on the TV. She does this because she knows that sooner or later whatever I throw at the TV is going to break it.
The Brinks ad is just another case of letting big brother take care of you, while you hide like a little sheep. The Police do a great job, but most of the time get there after everything is over to clean up the mess. The only mess at my house will be th BG bleeding out on the living room floor.
If your the bag guy, what's going to send your feet to runnin, an alarm or the sound of my 12 ga. racking a round into the chamber? It's a no brainer.
Good shooting, John K

mattd
August 21, 2003, 07:06 AM
When I seen it I thought it would be a good commerical for a mossberg.

brownie0486
August 21, 2003, 09:04 AM
Such negativity to alarm systems, I had no idea.

Being in the "business" let me give my take on this question.

I have ADT wireless at the house. If the lines are cut, it pages me anywhere in the US immediately with no user intervention on their part or mine.

If the alarm is tripped either motion or contacts, I get paged, they call my number and ask for a code to not call the cops.

If I don't answer, they dial the local pd. whi is dispatched immediately. I know as it has happened once by an attempted breakin. It was unsuccessful on their part.

Then there was the time my wife set off the panic alarm by accident and didn't realize it. She was pretty startled to see cruisers surrounding my house a few minutes after arriving home. I had been paged of course and was on the phone with the locals when they pulled up to my home. I stayed on the line with the sgt. at the desk [ who I know personally having worked with that dept as an LE in the past ], until the "all clear" was issued and I knew she was okay.

They respond within 2 minutes at my home and usually under that as they are aware of what may be stolen and out on the streets if they don't get there.

I'm paged either way, cut phones or unlawful entry. The PD gets a call within a minute from me to find out the status of the call.

As another mentioned it is a layered security plan. Good locks, good lighting and monitored 24/7 by ADT with the paging automatic needing no human intervention to screw things up. They give the PD a wrong address and they'll [ the cops ] know it's wrong as I'm on the line awaiting their arrival at my home and a disposition relative the call.

I feel good, the wife feels good and the BG's get caught if they stay in the house for more than 2 minutes. In that time they will never get what I'm worried about having stolen.

Oh, did I mention that the alarm is silent at the home? Reason: I want them caught and not scared off by a ringing bell at my location. Bells and whistles will likely deter entry once the break ocurrs, I don't want a response and no arrests. I want them inside and nabbed.

The alarm is not needed when I'm home :uhoh:

Brownie

Dain Bramage
August 21, 2003, 09:19 AM
So...what you're saying is even the professional alarm guy has false alarms? :evil:

Double Naught Spy
August 21, 2003, 09:21 AM
So who really buys into the whole Brinks Security commercial?

The is a nifty query. First, it has to be understood that a goodly amount of the poplulation believes that calling 911 is supposed to save them from whatever harm that may crop up, but now some know and some are surprised to find that calling 911 is a panacea answer. So the cops can't magically appear at a moment's notice. So, they dump the 911 idea and get Brinks Security because Brinks will call them, see if they are okay, and then call 911 in their area for them. Obviously, the cops will come really quicker if some phone jockey at Brinks calls and asks to have a squad dispatched to the woman's home. The squad probably won't come for the lady, but will for Brinks...as if the extended process and middleman somehow makes things work faster.

Who buys this stuff? Take the 911 tape of Nicole Brown Simpson where she calls 911 and is yelling OJ is at the door and is trying to get inside (and does) and is going to kill her. OJ can be heard in the recording. I continually fail to understand why folks who are in immediate threat from someone wanting to do them harm will sit tight by the phone as Nicole Brown Simpson did. Logically, there is no reason to believe that being on the phone will save a person from attack. HOWEVER, folks who will wait by the phone and chat with 911 as somebody breaks in their house would not hesitate for a second to flee the same home if it were on fire. Whether you are in your home when a fire breaks out or if you are in your home and some psycho dude is trying to break down your door to come hurt you, both situations have in common the aspect that danger is increased to the person if they choose to remain where harm is likely to occur.

XLMiguel
August 21, 2003, 09:32 AM
Yeah, we all be in violent agreement here, very lame/unrealistic commercial. Nevermind that for the price of a year's monitoring (@ $99/mo.) the lady could buy a very serviceable HD weapon, a decent class on how to use it safely & properly, and in 35/50 states, a CCW.

Gotta teach 'em to fish, ya know . . .:cool:

Master Blaster
August 21, 2003, 11:05 AM
14 years ago my house (no longer own that one) was broken into while we were at work 11:00-12:00 midday. They sacked the place dumped everyting on the floor and stole everything of value we had(not much). I installed a radio shack system with a tape dialer, and steel doors with double deadbolts. when the burglars came back 6 months later the dialer called 911 and me at work. I drove home in 10 minutes.
When I arrived the police had caught the 12 year old apprentice, trying to climb back out the basement window, nothing taken, or damaged, the siren scaredthe other two of them off. The 12 year old turned states evidence and they caught the other two, one of whom had a pawnshop full of stollen merchandise in his room at mom and dads, and 2 ounces of cocaine,scales bags etc.

I must be the only one whos alarm system worked.

We have a much better system now in a much better neighborhood.

The wireless dialer calls me, and my wife not 911, I make the call to 911.

The last time it went off was a year ago, I gentleman from home depo, had the wrong street, (same house number), and he went into my back yard to replace my storm door, when he found it locked (instructions said install door no one home), he opened it with a screwdriver. The motion detector in the sunroom he opened set of the alarm, my neighbor caught him, (shotgun), and called the police. I arrived 5 minutes before the police.

It turned out it was an honest mistake, but the police officer was suspicious of all of us!!!! especially me, since I look younger than I am, and I guess I dont look like I own a $300,000 house!!!!

:rolleyes:

Our alarm is always armed at night and when we are home.

If it goes off at night we have a plan that also includes loaded firearms.

I think of it as an early warning system just like a dog.

igor
August 21, 2003, 11:47 AM
Up here the business is understood slightly differently...

I work for a company that is among other things a security service provider. With burglary alarms the law of the land is that we have our own non-armed response that does the initial check of the perimeter to evaluate the need for police response. The police are dispatched directly only on robbery/assault alarms or to objects such as banks, jeweller's or pharmacies. We get about 80% false alarms, of which roughly half are solved on the phone before our patrol gets on the scene. Technically, that's not bad. Without a proper certification system for alarm installers we have no way to control who installs what and how as an "alarm system"; if it fills the basic requirements we have to take the client or our competition does.

The stuff we install ourselver or thru our self-certified partners gives no false alarms for technical or installment reasons - and the ones caused by personnel on-site are 90% solved on the phone. Training the client to communicate with us is an important part of the service.

Our guys are supposed to report and wait for the po-po to arrive if there's a hole in the perimeter. They never go in to get anybody out. What they do is place themselves right and wait - that's what they train, how to approach an object, use the vehicle right, what to look for, how to communicate and report, how to retreat safely in case. They carry ASP's, OC, handcuffs and such and wear body armor. Some patrols use dogs too, mostly to search thru construction sites and such on normal rounds.

What we get like this is zero injuries on our guys - no security officer was killed on duty for the last 30 years in the country. The criminal element is well aware that our people don't carry and very rarely carry themselves, let alone use what they carry. That they reserve to other members of the subculture. Brandishing an illegal firearm to fend off a security guy isn't worth the sentence compared to just giving it up if too slow to get away in time (we tend to be able to arrive on scene in around 7 minutes average).

Edged weapons are the problem, they are carried more frequently and that we address with the tools and training we give our guys.

The basic difference is that we just about never have to respond to a hot burglary. Our installments are very rarely even built to include a separate perimeter to activate while at home - there's just no demand. Burglaries happen on cold objects; once again a result of conveying the message that people should no be harmed if getting at property is the criminal's goal.

The insurance companies work closely with us. The burglary as itself rarely is the real problem for them, the afterwork is - or its absence. In our climate a smashed window will freeze over the whole building's central heating during a weekend if not repaired. A busted waterpipe will do much more. As a result we have nearly as much alarms from heating systems and humidity sensors as from burglary alarms.

What makes the interaction between the criminals and us (and especially the police) such in nature, that gunfire is very rarely heard, is remarkable though. I mean, the police are very well armed and trained (Glock 17s and 19s personal with H&K MP5's in cruisers, with some odd S&W revolvers and hunting rifles/shotguns still around) which gives the possibility to cop-aided-suicide, but that doesn't happen while committing a burglary or even robbery... the ones who try that are drunk at home, they just don't have the guts to do it themselves so they call the cops and say: "I got a gun, come and get me. " Even these are very rarely flushed out thru an assault - mostly securing the perimeter and letting time do its job will lead to a bloodless solution.

The ones on a burglary scene seem to have a clear sense of still having something to lose. This is as far as I've come in my research... :scrutiny:

4 eyed six shooter
August 22, 2003, 12:22 AM
My experience being 15 years as a police officer is that once the alarm is tripped, the alarm company spends 5 minutes trying to call back the person who had the alarm to confirm if it is for real. If they can't get ahold of the person they spend several more minutes calling the PD. The PD then dispatches the officers (if they are clear and not on other calls as is the case a good deal of the time). The officer then spends 2 to 10 minutes going to the house. By that time the BG is gone or had done his crime in most cases. You are damn luckey to get such quick response. Sometimes we would catch the BG at the scene, but most time not. Anyway, most people on this board are equipped to take care of a problem if it presents itself. The problem is the people who are not armed and think that the alarm is going to save them. They are better off just calling 911 themselves. They will get a faster response as it will go out as a higher priorty call then the alarm company call. False alarms are so common that the dispatchers don't get too excited over them, a real person calling asking for help gets the quick response. My dogs lets me know when someone is around. I don't need to pay a monthly bill for an alarm service. The only reason I can see to have an alarm system is for when you are not home, but as I said most of the time the perp is gone.
Good shooting, John K

4 eyed six shooter
August 22, 2003, 12:22 AM
My experience being 15 years as a police officer is that once the alarm is tripped, the alarm company spends 5 minutes trying to call back the person who had the alarm to confirm if it is for real. If they can't get ahold of the person they spend several more minutes calling the PD. The PD then dispatches the officers (if they are clear and not on other calls as is the case a good deal of the time). The officer then spends 2 to 10 minutes going to the house. By that time the BG is gone or had done his crime in most cases. You are damn luckey to get such quick response. Sometimes we would catch the BG at the scene, but most time not. Anyway, most people on this board are equipped to take care of a problem if it presents itself. The problem is the people who are not armed and think that the alarm is going to save them. They are better off just calling 911 themselves. They will get a faster response as it will go out as a higher priorty call then the alarm company call. False alarms are so common that the dispatchers don't get too excited over them, a real person calling asking for help gets the quick response. My dogs lets me know when someone is around. I don't need to pay a monthly bill for an alarm service. The only reason I can see to have an alarm system is for when you are not home, but as I said most of the time the perp is gone.
Good shooting, John K

Skunkabilly
August 22, 2003, 11:58 AM
I used to live in a very liberal area (Waxman's district) with 'This House Protected by So-and-So' signs in front of EVERY house.

This is in Los Angeles, so I wonder what the response time would be. I think the city of LA is thinking about, or has stopped, responding to alarms??? :confused:

Spieler
August 22, 2003, 12:03 PM
Hey, that commercial just ran as I was reading this thread! Yeah, kinda silly if taken at face value without some kind of backup plan...just hugging the kids close while waiting for the cops to arrive is probably not the best plan for survival. Also, IIRC there was a recent news story in my area that said the police where billing home owners if they responded to more than two false alarms in a 12 month period. An alarm system is certainly an integral part of a comprehensive home defense system, but should not be relied upon exclusively for protection.

Kharn
August 22, 2003, 12:10 PM
Igor:
The police are dispatched directly only on robbery/assault alarms or to objects such as banks, jeweller's or pharmacies.
Whats the difference between a burglar alarm and a robbery/assault alarm? The robbery/assault alarm has to be tripped manually?

Are police dispatched directly for alarms from gun dealers?

Kharn

treeprof
August 22, 2003, 12:49 PM
Abt a week after we got our alarm, we came home to find a coupla deputies in the drive. Seems as tho the installer re-used our alarm system's i.d number in another house, and then repeatedly set it off at that house while he was installing their system, wondering why things wouldn't work. Std alarm, smoke/fire alarm, panic mode, he tried 'em all. Fortunately the deputies got there real quick and called off the fire dept before they arrived.

lexical closure
August 22, 2003, 07:09 PM
I place burglar alarms in the same category as car alarms, just how many of you pay any attention to a car alarm going off in a crowded parking lot on a sunny Saturday afternoon at the mall?

Car alarms aren't entirely useless. I know this from experience, as my car was broken into one weekend and the alarm apparently scared the BG off, as absolutely nothing was missing.

Of course, it probably wouldn't stop someone who was really willing to get in there and rip stuff off while the alarm was sounding, but I'm glad I had the car alarm, as otherwise I'd be out a few skateboards and a car stereo.

Home alarms may be in the same category, but that makes them not entirely useless as well.

natedog
August 22, 2003, 07:45 PM
I saw that commercial and I am thinking of doing a parody of it.

First, show what would happen in real life: the BG breaks down the door, chases the family down, and brutally axe murders them.

Next, show the commercial over again, but this time when the man gets inside the house the lady pulls out a .44 Magnum and says, "Well, ya feeling lucky, punk? Huh? Do ya?" :)

larryw
August 22, 2003, 08:52 PM
What brownie said.

Our silent alarm calls the cops first, then they try to call us and cancel the 911 call.

Wife very good with *her* USP45C: pity the BG who breaks in when pappa bear isn't home and mamma bear is protecting the two cubs.

Moparmike
August 23, 2003, 02:46 PM
Another line that might work Nate: to the perp as he is lying on the floor in agony "You might want to consider a career change..." or "Ever get the feeling you shoulda just stayed in bed thismorning?"

the_redstar_swl
August 23, 2003, 08:34 PM
the ultimate home defense gun

http://www.dpmsinc.com/10Expand.asp?ProductCode=RFA2-M4PMC

this gun is seriously going to make the BG think twice :D :D

HankB
August 23, 2003, 11:53 PM
I have an alarm system (not Brinks) and consider it to be just one layer of security.

The Brinks commercial is laughable. Their print ads in the local paper are worse . . . first it shows "BRINKS" and says "CAN call police." Then it shows a silhouette of a Beretta pistol and says "CAN'T call police." :rolleyes:

This talk reminds me of a left-leaning teacher I had in high school who said that in the MODERN world, we didn't NEED guns to protect our homes . . . after all, we had TELEPHONES to call police.

She really didn't like my suggestion that we put her idea to the test. First, we'd start 20 feet apart, she with a telephone, me with a baseball bat. She could call the police and see if help arrived before I crossed that distance and clobbered her.

Then we'd repeat the experiment, except now she'd be the attacker with a bat and I'd be holding a .357, and we'd see how things worked out.

Her face was still red even after the student laughter died down . . . :evil:

(Today, a kid would probably be arrested for making such a suggestion . . . no tolerance for dissent, you know.)

El Rojo
August 24, 2003, 05:23 PM
I posted one of those stupid brinks printed ads of the Berretta and the brinks system in my apartment in LA. I couldn't think of anything witty, I just post it up as a silent sort of protest or someting of the sort. Anyway, that ad is the most stupid ad in existence. I think Berretta ought to make an ad showing a brinks shield and say "takes two to five minutes to get an armed officer to your house" and then the Berretta that says, "Takes 5 seconds to make you an armed officer".

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