Marksmanship Recipe


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schmeky
May 28, 2008, 11:25 PM
Dry fire

Rimfire

Centerfire

Can make a big difference if done diligently.

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Jason_G
May 30, 2008, 08:40 PM
Yeah, I'd say it can help speed up progress for many new shooters. I think that's sort of the natural progression most of us who were raised around guns take as we pick it up from family members, etc.

You know, Red Ryder to .22lr to shotguns and centerfire pistols and rifles.

That being said, I've also seen folks pick up big bore centerfires without ever having fired anything smaller, do pretty darn well if they don't flinch. Guess it depends on the individual some, too.

BTW, Rebels = :barf:
:neener: :p :D
Just pickin' (kinda). Nice to see another Louisianian on the boards though.

Best,
Jason

JoeSlomo
May 30, 2008, 10:51 PM
I shot bunches of rimfire and it didn't much help with .45.

For me the recipe that works is...

dry fire
dry fire
dry fire
center fire


YMMV

sdj
May 31, 2008, 11:47 AM
dry fire
dry fire
dry fire

+1 on that. :-)

AZ_Rebel
May 31, 2008, 02:27 PM
Marksmanship Recipe

Dry fire

Rimfire

Centerfire

This advice is wrong - and variations of this are the main reasons that there are so many poor gun handlers out there.

A Marksmanship Recipe is:

1. Proper Instruction
2. Proper Practise (Dry or Live)

It makes no difference if you Dry Fire/Rimfire/Centerfire if you do them wrong!
Proper gunhandling is NOT instinctive and bad habits are ingrained with repetition. Proper instruction on Safety, Grip, Stance, Sight Picture, Trigger Control is essential to becoming a consistent marksman. It does not really matter what type of gun you learn on IF you get proper instruction first. Dry Fire practice is always helpful with either Rim or Centerfire and is essential in creating the "unconcious competence" needed... The idea that Dry Fire is just a "step" in the "progression" is wrong.

Peter M. Eick
June 1, 2008, 07:54 AM
I guess I will always be a rebel or maybe not that good of a shooter. I have never dryfired a gun other then when cleaning or working on it. The idea of standing around and just listening to the gun go "click" does not seem to make much sense.

Why not hit the range and shoot live ammo and practice?

When I go, my plan is to work on one aspect of marksmanship that day. I don't worry about the results that much, but I just want to work on say the perfect trigger break, or the perfect sight picture. Focus on one task only and try to do it perfectly. Next time do something different like stance or grip.

This has worked well for me to get "reasonable". Competitive? No, reasonable, yes.

Dobe
June 1, 2008, 10:48 AM
Dry fire

Rimfire

Centerfire

Can make a big difference if done diligently.

I agree. It seems to be a natural progression, although it's not absolute.


This advice is wrong - and variations of this are the main reasons that there are so many poor gun handlers out there.

A Marksmanship Recipe is:

1. Proper Instruction
2. Proper Practise (Dry or Live)


I think you should give the original poster a little credit, and assume he means with proper instruction and practice, and not just handing someone a series of fireams.

jon_in_wv
June 1, 2008, 10:52 AM
I always though the recipe was:

Sight alignment +
Sight picture +
Trigger control.

It has always served me well.

I would say at least 99% of the shooting I've done in my lifetime has been with a 9mm. I haven't fire more than a couple hundred rounds of rimfire. I consider real rifle shooting to be when I can shoot a tight group with my Mosin Nagant 91/30. It has heavy recoil, long and heavy trigger pull, and a LONG sight radius that is hard for my eyes to focus on. If take real patience to put down a good group with it. After shooting it, I can shoot anything else even better.

I'm happy to see a thread about marksmanship btw. So many threads on stopping power and very little on marksmanship. In the grand scheme of things the rounds have to hit their target first.

Dobe
June 1, 2008, 12:38 PM
To me, rimfire is almost like dryfiring - little recoil with a lot of attention on the basics. I have found rimfires to be very helpful but certainly not required for marksmanship training. Besides, it's cheap shooting.

Another thing I like about rimfires is that it allows me to practice with a rifle while traveling for my job. One may not always be able to find an outdoor range, but can almost always find an indoor range.

Caseless
June 1, 2008, 07:58 PM
Front sight
Front sight
Press the trigger

schmeky
June 1, 2008, 09:23 PM
I think you should give the original poster a little credit, and assume he means with proper instruction and practice, and not just handing someone a series of fireams.

Thank you Dobe, I appreciate that. I will not go into my 40 year shooting history/background. Just sharing what I have used to markedly improve shooting my .45acp's through the years.

I would never suggest or condone anyone shoot without proper instruction. Afterwards, the dry-fire, rim-fire, center-fire progression can be helpful. Improving marksmanship will endure people to shooting and can help keep the sport viable.

bannockburn
June 1, 2008, 09:26 PM
At one range session, I took my teenage sister from .22LR (rimfire), to 9mm. (centerfire), to .45ACP(centerfire). All with proper instruction, of course. When she shot out the center of the bullseye at 30' with my Browning BDA in .45, I think class was definitely over.

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