Difficult time shooting Glock 19 accurately.. tips?


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andrewshogun
June 7, 2008, 04:16 AM
Of all the guns I own, I can shoot all of them decently well (especially the CZ's) with the exception of the Glock 19. I'm not one that is quick to blame the gun, because I know it is probably more user error (me) than the gun itself. So I wanted to get the feedback of other Glock 19 owners. Do you also find that this particular gun or Glocks in general are more difficult to shoot accurately with? Requires more practice? I'm best shooting 1911's, CZs, and even XDs. But for the life in me, I cannot shoot the Glock 19. I'll shoot a few rounds decently, but out of 10 rds I'll have at least a few fliers. My grouping is just horrible with this gun. Anyone else experience similarly? I really want to like this gun... but it's hard when you can't shoot it nearly as well as the rest of what you own! Not about to give up on it .. yet.

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Steve C
June 7, 2008, 04:44 AM
Slow fire you can get close to a SA trigger if you stack the trigger to the last couple OZ's of pressure left before it fires. This should improve your shooting. Then there's all the other things, squeeze (not pull) the trigger, sight alignment, pistol grip alignment, look at the sights and not the target, follow through, squeeze straight back on the trigger, use of the front pad of the finger, keeping a consistent grip pressure (neither increasing or decreasing during trigger squeeze).

Josh Aston
June 7, 2008, 06:08 AM
What sights do you have on it? I find that I can't shoot Glocks well at all with the stock plastic sights. Just not enough daylight on the sides of the front sight. Only other sights I've tried were Trijicons and I was much more accurate with those.

JDGray
June 7, 2008, 06:47 AM
Lots of dry fire practice! For what its worth, my G23 groups alot better than my G19 ever did:) A 3.5 connector also helps.

tblt
June 7, 2008, 08:41 AM
grip angle not good for some people

schmeky
June 7, 2008, 08:55 AM
Never could shoot my G19 the way I wanted to. Trigger was not to my liking (terrible), grip angle was faunky, and there was a opening at the bottom of the grip in the front that was sharp and painful (for me).

Most of all the trigger.

I no longer have it.

ChristopherG
June 7, 2008, 09:20 AM
No problems with mine, and at least one poll I've seen (don't remember if it was here or on another forum) indicates that the G19 is the most beloved Glock model there is. So, it fits and works for a lot of people; but that doesn't mean you have to like yours.

Standard 'tips' would be to make sure you're using the trigger reset correctly (not slapping the trigger or making yourself take up all the pretravel for every shot); not putting too much finger in the trigger (use the tip, out past the thick portion of the pad, not the bit near the distal joint); and trying, if you don't already use it, a 'both-thumbs-up' grip.

And, I agree about the stock sights; they suck. Try good black-on-black like 10-8's sights or, if you want night sights (and you do, right?) Heinie Straight-eight Slant-Pro sights.

DWARREN123
June 7, 2008, 09:41 AM
The GLOCK trigger is hard for some people to learn, I would say it is the trigger/finger relation.
I have to put more finger on my GLOCK trigger than any other handgun I have owned or fired and sometimes I mess up on getting enough on it or on it the same way everytime.

Riss
June 7, 2008, 09:57 AM
Front sight , front sight, front sight. Start practicing trigger pull close, about 6 feet. Aim using the front sight and slowly pull the trigger. Keep watching the front sight until the gun goes off and reacquire the front sight. Aiming dots should be little more than a quarter in diameter. Repeat until you can keep all shots in the dot, aiming at the top of the dot. Do this while having a solid, good purchase on the gun. Left hand should wrap around the gun and clamp side to side while the right hand provides the front to back clamping and stability. Left hand fills in the spot on the left hand side of the grip where the right hand is not and the fingers should wrap over the right hand.

Cgoronkin
June 7, 2008, 10:24 AM
tagged...

Rokman
June 7, 2008, 10:25 AM
I didn't shoot my Glocks well until a guy at a gun store taught me to grip the pistol with the palm of my support hand completely against the grip and my trigger hand thumb stacked on top of my support hand thumb (I started off shooting with my thumbs side by side) giving me greater support. My pistol shooting skills with all handguns took off from that point. He also told me to bend my wrists slightly forward with Glocks to keep my point of impact lower.

Spenser
June 7, 2008, 10:27 AM
I've admitted to this particular problem myself. I can group well with it, I just hit consistently about 1-3 inches to the left. Every time. I don't do it with my Sigs, Smiths, or 1911's. I don't even do it with the g26 and 27, but the 19 and 17 hit consistently to the left, every time.

I had to resort to drifting my sights on those guns.

welldoya
June 7, 2008, 12:23 PM
I don't shoot my G19 particularly well either. I like the gun, I just can't hit worth a darn with it.
I shoot well with my Series 70 Colt and my Smith Model 10 so it must just be something about the Glock that doesn't agree with me.

Deanimator
June 7, 2008, 01:16 PM
I've got a police surplus Glock 19 which I find very easy to shoot well.

1. What kind of trigger/connector do you have in yours? My Glock 22 had the "New York" trigger in it when I bought it. It was simply gruesome. I had a smith take it out (not knowing back then how easy Glocks were to work on). Both my 19 and 22 have 3.5lb. Ghost, Inc. connectors in them now. They're safe, but MUCH easier to shoot.

2. Do (or have done for you) the "$0.25 trigger job". Google that term. You'll find instructions for how to take the trigger mechanism apart and what areas to carefully polish with a mild polishing compound (I used Flitz) and Q-Tips. It doesn't take long and the difference in feel is nothing short of astonishing. If there's any model airplane type "flash" on the trigger or trigger safety, carefully trim or sand it off.

3. Practice. Shooting a "Safe Action" trigger is nothing like shooting an M1911. You have to get used to how it feels, whether you "stage" the trigger or use a constant trigger squeeze.

DawgFvr
June 7, 2008, 01:23 PM
I thank Spirit everyday that I began shooting with a DAO revolver. Ever since those early years, I have found pistols, shotguns and rifles triggers to be simple adjustments.

...with the exception of the DA/SA pistols. If it has a consistent trigger pull...I just adjust to it.

Northalius
June 7, 2008, 01:34 PM
I think it's the trigger style you're most likely not used to. Or'd someone change your trigger weight? Or... any change to the gun at ALL, from its original stock platform?

Funny, because my first pistol I shot was a Glock 23 (same platform, different caliber - .40 S&W), and I did fine with it; the .40 is even known to be "more snappy" than the 9mm, as well. I then shot a Sig P229 in .357 SIG, and did fine with that, as well.

Something is up with your pistol, or you just need to become accustomed to the unique Glock trigger pull, since you're probably so used to other trigger pulls.

That, or there was something screwed up with your sights.

Grip angle has nothing to do with it, imo. I was totally fine with the angle, and so are tens of thousands of different sized hand police officers around the country using Glocks. Don't listen to the nitpicking whiners about "grip angle." ;)

rcmodel
June 7, 2008, 01:39 PM
Ahhh! Glock perfection!
My one Glock had a loose plastic front sight right out of the box.
No way you can shoot good groups with the front sight wiggling around.

We won't even get into the crappy trigger & weird grip angle.

rcmodel

grimjaw
June 7, 2008, 02:28 PM
Anyone else experience similarly? I really want to like this gun... but it's hard when you can't shoot it nearly as well as the rest of what you own! Not about to give up on it .. yet.

I had a similar experience. After about 1000+ rounds, I got better and in the process learned to be a better shooter on double action triggers. It got to be acceptable but I'd still have a few fliers. I initially had a problem with the grip size, not the grip angle. Glock pistols point pretty naturally for me.

But then I picked up a CZ P-01, and was grouping better with it after 200 rounds than I was with the G19 after 1000, in the same shooting drills. The P-01 trigger isn't even that great as a SA trigger; the Glock is just that mushy. I shoot the CZ in DA almost as well as the G19. From a benched position and carefully aiming, the difference in groups between the two was negligible. But I never shoot that way after I figure out where my POI is relevant to my POA.

I really didn't want to like G19 at first, then really did want to like it when I started shooting the CZ. I sold them both, but ended up buying back CZ from the guy I sold it to. ;)

jm

jmr40
June 7, 2008, 03:00 PM
Dry fire. dry fire, dry fire. You cannot afford to buy the amount of ammo you need to become proficient. Glocks are different from most guns and if you are not used to them they can be difficult. When our local police dept. changed to Glocks a few years ago some of the older veteran cops who were excellent shots were really struggling at first. Many of the rookies with little or no experience were out shooting them with Glocks because they were not having to learn a new system.

While I know this is not technically correct I think of my Glocks as a single action pistol with a long take up and a 5 lb. trigger. When I started shooting them that way I got a lot better. There is little difference in accuracy between me and my Glocks and any other guns I own.

ZombiesAhead
June 7, 2008, 03:12 PM
I've had trouble with my G19 compared to other pistols. It remains my carry gun because the size and weight are so convenient.

I find larger, heavier pistols SO MUCH easier to shoot accurately. I shoot much better with the Beretta 92, Jericho, and my CZ-75 SP-01.

schmeky
June 7, 2008, 03:44 PM
What grimjaw and alexd said.

I still have a G17 and shoot it occassionally. However, after getting my CZ SP-01, it was all over. Admittedly, the G17 and SP are very different, but shooting the CZ well is almost to easy, compared to the Glock.

ScaryWoody
June 7, 2008, 08:57 PM
I find I have to use a slightly different head position with the G19. I found that if you take up the trigger creep before final squeeze it will tighten up the group. It does take a bit of getting used too. The grip angle doesn't bother me but the grip is much blockier than most of my other pistols.

MT GUNNY
June 8, 2008, 12:40 AM
Dry fire like others have said.
Someone once said that Glock and similar built pistols like M&P are purpose built for Combat, You may find like I have that Gripping that thing with your trigger finger as far as it will go on the trigger,while keeping a comfortable grip, groups will get tighter. unlike shooting a 1911 or others where you would use the tip or first joint of your trigger finger.

andrewshogun
June 10, 2008, 04:59 AM
good to hear I am not the only one. thanks for all the feedback. I'm looking into a simple trigger job on the glock 19... not sure how much that will help my shooting though, so maybe not :)

Lucky 7
June 10, 2008, 05:50 AM
It's odd but for some Glock's grip angle can alter bone alignment. Double check and make sure the top of your hand to you wrist to your forearm is straight. See if that is causing you problems.

Regards,
L7

distra
June 10, 2008, 06:44 AM
I'm mainly a 1911 shooter as well and I don't seem to have any trouble with the 19. I bought an older used model with the half-moon cut in the bottom front of the grip. I changed the sights out to three dot night sight, put in the #3 connector, and added a Pierce grip enhancer. Now I could shoot this one fine before the mods, but I do shoot it better post mods. I've used it in our IDPA matches pretty successfully. I shoot the 19 better than my XD9. I would suggest my mods to the 19 with the #3 connector and maybe the sights first. The stock Glock sights have never been appealing to me. YMMV

bluto
June 10, 2008, 09:52 PM
Andrewshogun - I have the same problem you do. I recently got a G19 and, although I love the size and feel, I'm finding out that I just can't get it to group well. I can kick it's ass with any of my other 9mm's. By a lot.

Now here's the interesting part: I have a G22 that I can shoot very well although I put a KKM match barrel in it. So I know Glocks can be accurate and I know that I can shoot them accurately. I have also switched out the stock barrel on my G19 with a KKM match barrel and it didn't change anything. I switched back to the stock one.

I can't believe that the gun is that inaccurate with two different barrels because the groups are nearly identical = about 2X the size of my other 9's. It's has to be me.

I'll try some of the tips on this thread and see if my results change. Thanks.

varoadking
June 10, 2008, 11:19 PM
I have several Glocks. They are not exactly what I would call accurate pieces. Any SiG will outperform them in this category, all day, every day...

That said, I genuinely like my G22...

crebralfix
June 10, 2008, 11:33 PM
All the Glocks point high for me. 1911's and SIGs work great for me in terms of grip angle.

However, I still shoot the Glock really, really well.

There is no excuse for failing like this...including "pointability" and "grip angle". If you are using these as an excuse, then you are inventing a crutch to justify your failure. I got over my Glock problems by applying the fundamentals consistently across thousands of rounds and many, many hours of CORRECT dry fire.

You need to dry fire CORRECTLY and then validate that work on the range. The fastest way to do this is to hire an instructor for several one hour shooting sessions. After that, attend a defensive pistol course. Maintain your skill by shooting any 22 caliber handgun.

If I can do it, you can do it. This isn't magic or rocket science. You only need to purchase ammunition and range lessons. No "match barrel" and "super-dooper trigger job" is going to help you (but you'll feel better about the WOW! factor).

***

downrange.tv has "The Wall Drill" and "The Bump Drill" ... you should watch them.

.38 Special
June 11, 2008, 12:25 AM
Don't know why this is a difficult question, or even a question at all: Glock triggers suck, at least by any standard definition of a "good" trigger. This generally does not matter, IMO, considering the Glock's intended mission.

I am told that, with extensive practice, the Glock trigger can be mastered. Life is too short, as far as I am concerned, but there you go.

wyocarp
June 11, 2008, 12:28 AM
I like my G19's and I think they are accurate.

If you are having problems hitting anything with yours, try the longer 33 round magazine. I'm sure with 33 rounds you'll hit something.

PhillyGlocker
June 11, 2008, 12:39 AM
Oh stop! No one has a hard time shooting a G19. I've seen females who are interested in SD come into a range and shoot tight groups with a G19. I'm calling you out on this thread. Any trained shooter kicks arse with the G19.

The End.

.38 Special
June 11, 2008, 12:50 AM
Fanboys are funny.

bluto
June 11, 2008, 01:05 AM
Fanboys are funny.

:D

crebralfix
June 11, 2008, 09:29 AM
Wow! You guys must be really bad shooters if you cannot get a Glock trigger to perform.

And, no, I don't "like" Glocks. They don't point well for me and the grips aren't all that great. Overcoming this was not difficult, though people on forums sure seem to make a big deal out of it.

Granted, a distinction between combat and target shooting should be made. If you're expecting something suitable for NRA Bullseye, then you're using the wrong gun. But, there's no reason why a person couldn't pickup a Glock and get two inch groups with it.

It's not about being a "fanboy"...it's about being sufficiently trained that one can pick up any pistol and use it. Apparently, this is a bit much to expect. Given that I see guys at the NRA Range shooting $2000 rifles from the bench and getting four inch groups at 25 or 50 yards, I guess I should not really expect much in terms of performance.

Luis Leon
June 11, 2008, 09:46 AM
I had the same problem with my G19, but it was me not the gun, as my wife could shoot it fine. I got rid of the G19 and went with a CZ75 P01 which I shot better right out of the box. I sold my G19 and now own 3 CZs. That said, I've seem plenty of good shooting by guys with their G19s at IDPA matches.

BigG
June 11, 2008, 10:34 AM
Take your time and pay attention to what you are doing. You will soon learn to group with it.

bluto
June 11, 2008, 02:14 PM
Gee Crebralfix, you've been around The High Road long enough to know that there's no need to make disparaging comments about fellow members capabilities just to try and make a point. :D

The OP and a few others, including me, are asking for comments and sharing their experiences with the G19. Why assume and assert that we're all un-trained, lousy shots?

I shoot almost exclusively at 25 yards offhand - except for defensive drills and sight-ins which usually occur at 10 yards or less. Here are a few (I have many more examples) of my most recent targets from my last range session with the particular pistol represented. Both the targets for the G22 (please note the "G" stands for Glock and the SIG 226 .40 were shot the same session.

I shoot as well regularly with all my other pistols except my G19. I admitted that it is probably me. Thanks to those who have made constructive comments.;)

AndyC
June 11, 2008, 02:36 PM
I don't like Glocks in the slightest, but they can be superbly accurate if you can get used to the trigger - which is really only going to come through decent practice.

.38 Special
June 11, 2008, 07:29 PM
Wow! You guys must be really bad shooters if you cannot get a Glock trigger to perform.
I'm rated "master" in NRA action shooting. This is not meant as a boast as there are a lot of people who can outshoot me, but merely to explain that I'm not completely useless with a handgun. And I don't shoot Glocks well because the triggers make things much harder than they need to be.

This does not mean, BTW, that I cannot hit the B-27 at 7 yards, or anything like that, but that, on a standard slowfire target, I am putting rounds into the eight ring that would be nines and tens with a good trigger. Or that I have to go a half-second slower on the falling plates or risk misses.

Does this make the Glock a bad pistol, or one that is unsuitable for combat? Of course not. It simply means that I, like a lot of people, hit better and/or faster with most other guns. Nor does it mean that the Glock trigger cannot be mastered, as plenty of people have shown that it can. But then, through long practice as a young boy I mastered the long, creepy 12 pound trigger on my first .22 rifle. That doesn't mean it's a good thing, or that such triggers should be considered acceptable.

YMM, of course, V.

10-Ring
June 11, 2008, 08:16 PM
Don't shoot anything else for several 100 rounds -- until you get use to it & develop some muscle memory with it. Stick to one brand of ball ammo so the only variance you have to master is you
congrats & have fun!

bluto
June 11, 2008, 09:00 PM
10-Ring - I think this is exactly what I need to do. I've only sold 2 guns in my life and I ain't selling the G19!

And +1 to .38 Special.

ken grant
June 11, 2008, 09:40 PM
Buy an Advantage Arms .22LR Conversion Kit for your 19 and get in a lot of CHEAP practice.
I have 2 kits, one for a 19/23 and a 21 and I love them.They have made me a better shooter with the Glocks.
I had a hard time at first because I have been shooting 1911's most of my life(72 yrs old now) but now things are much better.

crebralfix
June 12, 2008, 08:15 AM
This isn't a "High Road" Politically Correct answer. If you cannot handle it, move on.

The OP and a few others, including me, are asking for comments and sharing their experiences with the G19. Why assume and assert that we're all un-trained, lousy shots?

Several people have stated, in their own words, that they are lousy shots.

They may be decent shooters with one particular platform, but their skill level is such that they do not have the mental and/or physical understanding of a variety of guns. This tells me their skills are lacking in one or more of the fundamental areas of handgun shooting.

So, again, we're back to the failure of the shooter to understand and use the gun as intended. Competition guns are not combat guns. (I'm defining a competition gun as one expressly built for that purpose, which includes heavily modified combat guns). The Glock is a combat handgun that happens to be used in some "combat" competition games (and not the other way around, though some argument could be made about the 17L, 34, and 35 models).

Why can't people figure this out? It's just not that hard. If you want tiny groups, use the correct competition tool created for that purpose. I certainly wouldn't take my Glock 21 and an Advantage Arms 22 Conversion kit to an NRA Bullseye Competition. Additionally, don't take your competition gun to a fight.

How can someone be considered a master in handgunnery if they cannot use any handgun well? Specifically, "action handgun" implies some sort of loosely combat oriented discipline. You should be able to pick up any handgun and do well with it. If you cannot get a 2-4 inch group with a Glock, SIG, S&W revolver, Kel Tec (or any other gun), then you have some "fundamentals" work to do. Dependence upon a particular trigger or other gadget just means you're a trying to purchase a better score ("gaming"). But, to say you cannot shoot it well simply due to one or two factors reeks of incompetence (from previous posters' words, not mine) based upon a lack of practice and forethought about handgunning.

My old "shootin' towel" listed a whole bunch of shooting excuses: "FARTED", "FLY on the front sight", "DRUNK", and so forth. That's all they are: excuses! I have seen it a hundred times, both in preparing for competition and defensive handgun training. When people start whining on forums like this, it's because they're refusing to admit their failure on the range.

CountGlockula
June 12, 2008, 12:18 PM
It takes some getting used to. One thing to consider Glocks weigh at 22-35 ounces. Not a lot of people are used to the light weight.

Just take your time slowly pulling the trigger...or have another person try it out.

I have no trouble shooting 10 shots at 25 yards....and I shoot .40S&W!!!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v171/Gregdog/Pin%20Ups/10-5RangeReport003.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v171/Gregdog/Pin%20Ups/10-5RangeReport002.jpg

R&J
June 12, 2008, 01:16 PM
In good hands, Judy's 3rd gen G19 is a tack driver. I can center-core targets with it all day long.

Even when I'm having a sucko day with other guns, I can produce great targets with her G19.

Want to fast-track your shooting with this gun? Slip a well collimated laser on or in it, and you'll work the kinks out in one or two range sessions. I'll bet you'll be surprised at what your hands are really doing!

I saw Judy straighten a new shooter out in one magazine's worth of shooting, with her LaserMax-equipped G19. And I'm not talking laser targeting, I'm talking about the laser as a training aid. This gal's hands were all over the place. She was sometimes missing the entire target! The laser describes the smallest hand movements, and she could see it. It's instinctive, like catching a ball, when you can see it. That revelation straightened her right out!

When we left, most of this young lady's shots were in the nine ring or better!

--Ray

bluto
June 12, 2008, 07:00 PM
This isn't a "High Road" Politically Correct answer. If you cannot handle it, move on.

There's a difference between being politically correct and ill-mannered. I'd say you really need to work on your "fundamentals".

When people start whining on forums like this, it's because they're refusing to admit their failure on the range.

What on earth are you talking about?

Oh, and nice shootin' Count.

.38 Special
June 12, 2008, 07:11 PM
Several people have stated, in their own words, that they are lousy shots.

They may be decent shooters with one particular platform, but their skill level is such that they do not have the mental and/or physical understanding of a variety of guns. This tells me their skills are lacking in one or more of the fundamental areas of handgun shooting.

So, again, we're back to the failure of the shooter to understand and use the gun as intended. Competition guns are not combat guns. (I'm defining a competition gun as one expressly built for that purpose, which includes heavily modified combat guns). The Glock is a combat handgun that happens to be used in some "combat" competition games (and not the other way around, though some argument could be made about the 17L, 34, and 35 models).

Why can't people figure this out? It's just not that hard. If you want tiny groups, use the correct competition tool created for that purpose. I certainly wouldn't take my Glock 21 and an Advantage Arms 22 Conversion kit to an NRA Bullseye Competition. Additionally, don't take your competition gun to a fight.

How can someone be considered a master in handgunnery if they cannot use any handgun well? Specifically, "action handgun" implies some sort of loosely combat oriented discipline. You should be able to pick up any handgun and do well with it. If you cannot get a 2-4 inch group with a Glock, SIG, S&W revolver, Kel Tec (or any other gun), then you have some "fundamentals" work to do. Dependence upon a particular trigger or other gadget just means you're a trying to purchase a better score ("gaming"). But, to say you cannot shoot it well simply due to one or two factors reeks of incompetence (from previous posters' words, not mine) based upon a lack of practice and forethought about handgunning.

My old "shootin' towel" listed a whole bunch of shooting excuses: "FARTED", "FLY on the front sight", "DRUNK", and so forth. That's all they are: excuses! I have seen it a hundred times, both in preparing for competition and defensive handgun training. When people start whining on forums like this, it's because they're refusing to admit their failure on the range.
"It doesn't have to be accurate; it's for COMBAT!!! If you wanted an accurate gun, you should have BOUGHT one!" LMAO.

But then I see that you're coming from the point of view that 4" groups -- presumably at "combat" ranges -- are perfectly fine. So yes, in that light I admit that it does not matter how bad your trigger is.

doc2rn
June 12, 2008, 07:28 PM
I'm best shooting 1911's, CZs, and even XDs. But for the life in me, I cannot shoot the Glock 19.

You are comparing apples and oranges, I shoot angle gripped weapons like the Ruger standard and the G32 with ease.
If I dont shoot a platform like my Colt 1911 MIM well I practice till I get proficient. I do this with all my weapon systems. ;);)

redneckrepairs
June 12, 2008, 07:44 PM
All the help i might give has already been given Slow down , and front sight . put a snap cap in and just work the hell out of it . A glock trigger is like no other ( and frankly i dont own glocks partly due to the trigger . ) . However you can learn to shoot it , i just dislike glocks so i wont put a lot of effort into them . The local pd issues glocks for them who cannot afford a pistol that meets the loose guidelines they have . Loose is a good thing btw lol . however if you cannot afford a pistol you will be issued a glock , and a level 3 holster to wear . You may get a ,40 or a 9mm but you will get a glock and a holster lol .

wristtwister
June 12, 2008, 10:17 PM
Dang... I thought Glocks and Sigs jumped out of the holsters and lined up all by themselves, to hear the proponents talk. I'm really stunned that you could have a problem shooting a tight group... just kidding.

I've said before that every pistol has it's "quirks", and you have to spend some time learning what they are before you start selling it back to the gun store. My Beretta 92 tends to shoot low and left(grip problem) and my Ruger SR-9 is dead on. My .40 cal Smith is also dead on, now that I've toyed with the sights a bit, and adjusted them to my particular line of vision.

While "aiming" is pretty standard, the "finger roll" of some guns causes it to misalign as you pull the trigger, or the grip you use changes and causes the gun to pull down or push up. I can shoot tight groups with one hand, and shoot the same gun with the other, and be all over the target using the same techniques and grip. It's a matter of practice and learning "where to aim" with each particular pistol.

I have a tendency to pull down and right with my Smith, but usually after the first couple of shots, I remember that, and adjust my grip, which shoots me back into the center of the target... so spend the time to learn where the problem is, and then practice to solve it. I suggest "bench shooting" it until you get the quirks documented, and then start doing things with your technique to get back into the center.

I shoot better from a kneeling "forward lean" position than a standing position, and shoot better "braced" off the wall than freehand... so try different things to figure out what's going on with the gun... and start with the target close enough to be able to shoot near the center as you see where the hits are being made. They will only get worse as the target moves away, so learn "close" first, and then move the target back. Our firearms instructor used to tell us "if you can't hit it at 5 feet, you won't hit it at 50 feet... line it up, then ... line it up further away".

WT

Abunai
June 12, 2008, 10:39 PM
I had similar problems with my Glock 23. I did OK with my 22 and 27, but the 23 was all over the place. I tried a couple things, but the cause was a rough trigger that actually moved the gun when released.

I installed the 5.5 pound 'tactical trigger kit' from Aro-Tek, and the results were amazing. The group sizes dropped dramatically, the gun functioned perfectly the first try, and the trigger pull was good. Not tuned 1911 good, but pretty crisp. Installation was easy, and took maybe five minutes.

I've got to add that it was a relief to find out that the solution wasn't my shooting skills (or lack thereof)!

MarcusWendt
June 13, 2008, 04:44 PM
Not everyone will shoot every gun the same. Glocks imparticular seem to be a love or hate gun.

I don't shoot Glocks well at all.

Try an M&P or an XD.

Paladin7
June 13, 2008, 05:07 PM
It doesn't surprise me that you shoot the 1911 or CZ better, they are heavier. I'd suggest that if you like to carry the Glock 19, the best way to deal with this is to focus on and practice the fundamentals. With practice you will shoot it much better.

OOOXOOO
June 13, 2008, 05:22 PM
My Glock 19 was my first carry pistol. I had a hard time learning the trigger. Many have already mentioned it but a good grip, proper trigger finger placement( I shoot better with the inside of the distal joint), and lots of dry fire practice. Dry fire practice is the only time I like a laser sight because it really shows the amount of movement at POI. Also I find that when I shoot to the left and to the left and low especially I am manipulating the trigger to fast and jerking my shot.

JDGray
June 13, 2008, 07:34 PM
Countglockula,
Thats some mighty fine target work!!:)

Old School
June 13, 2008, 08:06 PM
I had a glock 23 for over 10 years and never really did make friends with it. I can't explain why I stuck with it for so long. I traded it for a p345 ruger a few years back and never looked back. The ruger and I were fast friends.

Sometimes what you think you might like is different from what you find actually works for you. At least, that is how it was for me.

FieroCDSP
June 14, 2008, 12:24 AM
Seriously- Buy a Smith M&P. :D (had to say that since no one else has. Payback's a B****, isn't it Glockers?)

I think this thread illustrates that one gun doesn't fit everyone. Like Count proved, a tight group is possible with a Glock. Most everyone here, and in numerous other places I've seen, agree that the stock Glock trigger needs work. It's a combat trigger, sure. But if you can never attain that sweet group like the poster with the Sig, or even a nice clover-leaf, you'll never "feel" like you're shooting great. You might be combat ready, but that extra bit of success will elude you until you get the trigger job done.

Find the gun you love to hold, shoot, and shoot well. Life's too short to shoot a gun you dislike. Oh, and take a basic pistol course if you haven't already. Basics basics basics.

nelson133
June 14, 2008, 07:05 AM
As others have said, maybe the gun just doesn't fit you. Glocks sure don't fit me. I've tried them and can't shoot them well at all. I took a friend from work to my club range and he brought his pair of Glocks. He told me he thought he was a bad shot because no matter how much he practiced, he couldn't hit the target consistently. I let him try some other makes, Sig, Beretta, and a couple of S&W M&Ps. Even they were new to him he shot them all better than his guns. Glocks work very well for some people, I've seen some amazing shooting by Glock users. They just aren't for everyone.

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