solid brass ramrod


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rem700nut
June 12, 2008, 04:17 AM
my ramrod on my tc hawkin cracked today. seen this one outfit had a solid brass ramrod for the hawkin, it is 3/8 thick does not say how heavy ,anyone use one of these? and how heavy are they and how good? and since brass is soft how easy is it to bend when reloading ? other option is the tc polymer coated fiberglas rod.

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rem700nut
June 12, 2008, 06:00 AM
i forgot it is 28 inches long

Voodoochile
June 12, 2008, 06:30 AM
Why not get one of these?

http://www.trackofthewolf.com/(S(ozny11453an41s45jrcyq2uk))/categories/tableList.aspx?catId=6&subId=48&styleId=138&partNum=RAMROD-285-50

mykeal
June 12, 2008, 07:30 AM
I have a solid brass 3/8" thick range rod from October Country, found on this page: http://www.octobercountry.com/products2.php?categoryid=377

Very solid, absolutely no (like in zero) flexing. Very satisfied with it. I bought the one with the round handle, but it's available with a T handle as well. You can also have solid brass underbarrel replacement rods made in various lengths, thicknesses and end configurations.

They also sell synthetic (delrin) rods; there's much discussion about what the best material is for a range rod: one of the composite materials, stainless steel, brass, etc. I have two rang e rods, the brass one and a composite one with a T handle that I've had for a couple of years. Both have muzzle crown protectors. The brass rod is quite a bit heavier and has no flex at all; the composite rod is lighter and does flex a bit but is very strong. I have not decided which is better - both have their strengths.

hamourkiller
June 12, 2008, 09:14 AM
This link to RMC will let you be able to order a brass or aluminum ram rod. I have both and like the aluminum best for hunting. It is light and strong.

http://rmcsports.com/catalog.htm

either product is great

sundance44s
June 12, 2008, 09:32 AM
My local gun makes uses the brass ram rods to balance out a Ky rifle if it`s needed , some do some don`t he builds ...they are pretty heavy .

RyanM
June 12, 2008, 09:41 AM
No one's said weight yet. I don't have one, but mathematically, a solid 3/8" diameter, 28" long brass rod will weigh almost exactly 1 pound.

4v50 Gary
June 12, 2008, 09:44 PM
I use a 3/8" solid brass rod for the range and no, I won't carry it in the woods. My uncle made it from the connecting rods for a panic door (the rods extend up and down from the panic bar and disengages the upper and lower bolt).

armedandsafe
June 12, 2008, 11:09 PM
I bought brass rod and made my own range rod by center drilling and tapping. They are very good at the range, but are way too heavy for mounting under the barrel. They throw off the balance of the rifle. That is 3 Hawkins, a Trophy and a Squirrel Rifle.

Pops

Voodoochile
June 12, 2008, 11:56 PM
My Bobcat has a Aluminum rod that I had cut, drilled & jagged for under barrel use because that old POC wood rod that came with it broke the first outing I had with it nearly 15 years ago.

Outside of show purposes none of my rifles nor future ML. shotguns will ever have a wooden rod attached to it for long.

omarkw11@gmail.com
June 13, 2008, 01:00 AM
brass rods are good, but very HEAVY. if you take a wooden rod and soak it in kerosene or diesel until it wont float, it becomes flexible and tough. thats what i do to my rods. i also use steel range rods at shoots, but if hunting or walking much, i just use my wood rods. havent broken a rod since i started soaking them.

arcticap
June 13, 2008, 01:47 AM
Virtually Indestructible Ramrod: It has a wood exterior with a steel core. :)

http://www.periodramrod.com/

Mike 56
June 18, 2008, 11:24 PM
I made my range rod out of 5/16 steel rod with a brass door knob for a handle. I taped for the jag and made a muzzle protector out a 5/16 brass flair fitting. the rod works great no flex and the knob is comfortable to use.

MikeM38 002.jpg (760.4 KB)

Grey Wolf
July 2, 2008, 02:24 AM
The one on the left is a GI .50 cal machine gun cleaning rod. The head swivels and it breaks down into 4 pieces. They used to be common at gun shows.

Next is a 3/8" brass rod. I use it the most as it doesn't rust and get my hands filthy when I use it. I keep a .58 caliber cleaning jag on it that fits my favorite percussion rifle.

Last is a 3/8" steel rod. It rusts quickly, especially when the weather is humid. I keep a .54 caliber cleaning jag on it that fits my favorite flintlock rifle. This rod was a rendezvous prize.

They are threaded 8/32. You see that they have antler handles that are pinned to the shafts with brass rods.

The tapered reducers prevent the rod from wearing on the barrel crown and rifling. They allow the rods to fit .40 caliber bores and up. GI .30 caliber machine gun cleaning rods are available for squirrel guns, but it takes 2 of them to have enough sections for a long barrel.

The reducers and cleaning jags came from Track of the Wolf, but lots of places have them.

They are range rods, of course. When I hunt I just use the wooden rods on my rifles. I don't get enough shots off in a day to need to carry a metal rod.

My first flintlock rifle was a .36 caliber. I used its little wooden rod. One day it broke while putting a ball down the barrel. One jagged end went pretty deep into my palm. That's when I started using a metal rod at the range.

Grey Wolf
July 2, 2008, 02:29 AM
The one on the left is a GI .50 cal machine gun cleaning rod. The head swivels and it breaks down into 4 pieces. They used to be common at gun shows.

Next is a 3/8" brass rod. I use it the most as it doesn't rust and get my hands filthy when I use it. I keep a .58 caliber cleaning jag on it that fits my favorite percussion rifle.

Last is a 3/8" steel rod. It rusts quickly, especially when the weather is humid. I keep a .54 caliber cleaning jag on it that fits my favorite flintlock rifle. This rod was a rendezvous prize.

They are threaded 8/32. You see that they have antler handles that are pinned to the shafts with brass rods.

The tapered reducers prevent the rod from wearing on the barrel crown and rifling. They allow the rods to fit .40 caliber bores and up. GI .30 caliber machine gun cleaning rods are available for squirrel guns, but it takes 2 of them to have enough sections for a long barrel.

The reducers and cleaning jags came from Track of the Wolf, but lots of places have them.

They are range rods, of course. When I hunt I just use the wooden rods on my rifles. I don't get enough shots off in a day to need to carry a metal rod.

My first flintlock rifle was a .36 caliber. I used its little wooden rod. One day it broke while putting a ball down the barrel. One jagged end went pretty deep into my palm. That's when I started using a metal rod at the range.

sharps59
July 2, 2008, 11:44 PM
some say not to use brass it will hold dirt and grit then act as a file on your bore

Coyote Rider
July 3, 2008, 12:46 PM
I got a fiberglass rod for $6 at Longs drug store and it works fine.

Army
July 3, 2008, 10:38 PM
I've broken every "unbreakable" rod made. My range rods are October Country brass with antler handles. I also diesel soaked my .54 gun rod to increase flexibility, and as I rarely use it, I haven't broken it in 20 years.

My .32 also has its own brass range rod, which makes it easy to load that long barrel.

As for brass rods accumulating particles; since smokepoles do not use jacketed ammo, there really isn't any hard debris for it to scrub about or embed, and blackpowder residue is known for its "softness".

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