20 best knives ever made


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AnthonyC.
June 20, 2008, 08:36 PM
I was reading Field and Stream today and came across an section that listed the 20 best knives ever made.
http://www.fieldandstream.com/article_gallery/The-20-Best-Knives-Ever-Made/1
Do you agree to this list?

and if you had to pick the 20 best knives ever made make your own list, I would like to see it:)

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Valkman
June 20, 2008, 08:57 PM
Some good ones there for sure like Randall, Lake and Loveless. I'd probably change a few but I don't know every knife ever made. I do believe my own knives should have been listed 3rd, 6th and 12th. :D

Skofnung
June 20, 2008, 09:06 PM
The only issues I have with that list are the exclusion of a regular Scandinavian style knife and the inclusion of the Swiss Champ.

22-rimfire
June 20, 2008, 09:55 PM
I know the knives listed are all great knives or have been significant historically. I don't think I'm qualified to challenge the list with my own list, but most of those knives would not be on my list. My list would concentrate on pocket knives and not fixed blades. Pocket knives get used, fixed blades sit around and look pretty. What about Bill Moran? Hebben? My top knife would probably be a Case Stockman. Uncle Henry, definitely. The Old Timer would be in the top 10. The Buck 110 would be in the top 10. Yes to the Randall. Swiss Army knife, yes. Lovelass, sure. Busse, no way; too new. Knives of Alaska might make my top 50. They must advertise in Field & Stream. :)

AnthonyC.
June 20, 2008, 10:15 PM
Thats what I was thinking about today aswell, what are fixed blades used for? does anybody carry one daily? Aren't they a little big to carry?

Valkman
June 20, 2008, 11:06 PM
Actually I was thinking folders shouldn't be on the list! It wasn't "20 Knives that get used the most" which would probably be kitchen knives but the 20 best. Just about all my picks would be handmades except for the SAK and maybe the 110. And maybe a Case. Argh!

22-rimfire
June 20, 2008, 11:12 PM
Interesting how we read the same word "best" and interpret a different meaning.

SAG0282
June 20, 2008, 11:33 PM
The only issues I have with that list are the exclusion of a regular Scandinavian style knife and the inclusion of the Swiss Champ.

Well, there are so many Swiss Army models that really they should have just said "Victorinox Swiss Army knife".....it's my favorite kind of knife, the most handy for my own purposes and of exceedingly high quality. I own a champ but usually carry my new CyberTool, Explorer, or Farmer. No list really could be complete without a nod of some sort to SAKs.

Overall, pretty good list.

SlamFire1
June 20, 2008, 11:41 PM
Heck, the guy is just showing off his post WWII collection. Shill gunwriters do this all the time, basically pumping up the value of what he owns.

Now some of those are very significant knives.

I might have tossed in an abalone shell handled, San Fransico Bowie, made by Michael Price if it was my list. Maybe a modern Morseth Cascade Hunter. And the guy has totally ignored the Green River knives.

I do think the Swiss Army Knife, Bo Randall, the Buck 110, the leatherman, had very significant impacts on the evolution of knives.

The rest, well, lesser impacts. And the majority of his knives, just things he owns.

jahwarrior
June 21, 2008, 12:22 AM
the best knife ever made is the one you always reach for and stuff into your pocket/bag/sheath before you head out the door. all of those knives listed are no doubt fine blades, but the whole "best knife" thing is pretty much subjective. some other joe might think emerson karambits, benchmade balisongs, spyderco enduras, and microtech HALOs are the best ever. i say, whatever you trust and love.

The Tourist
June 21, 2008, 12:35 AM
Like everyone else, I enjoy articles like "The Best Year Mustang?" or things like, "If You Only Had One Gun."

I like reading them, and it makes me think. The problem for me becomes how can I answer the question honestly. Which is better? Lile or Loveless? Yikes, I love them both.

And who's to say that my criteria is best? For me, things have to work. Things like tough denim jeans, bright SureFires, Emerson folders, V-Twin engines, WigWam socks. And yet I still turn my head listening to the howl of a Lambo Diablo.

Best twenty, eh? Okay, here goes. Two are Loveless, three are Emerson, two are Graham, one is Puma, two are Microtech, two are from Greek and Roman antiquities (a gladius and a xiphos), one is Lile, one is Kabar, and the remaining are an historic smattering of European automatic stilettos.

My choices are the result of when innovation changed the course of design and the quality of human life.

Rupestris
June 21, 2008, 12:47 AM
I subscribe so I read it a few weeks ago. You gotta hand it to Petzal. He can be a very opinionated writer. From slapping triggers on rifles to his choice of the top 20 knives. As stated, its just his opinion. He does very well for himself as an outdoor writer and experienced sportsman. As much as I disagree with some of the things he writes, I still find myself reading his column, dissecting every statement as if it was begging to be debunked.

In most cases I find his choices in gear of quality and his opinion to be well founded as its simply based on one mans experience. Sure, I could disagree with probably 50 or 60% of the knives listed but the knives I've owned and used are simply different from his. I've yet to see him recommend an inferior or (even worse) dangerous product.

If any one of us were to put together a list of our top 20 knives, I'm willing to bet that no one would agree on the choices made. I'd even go so far as to say that most would not agree more than 75% with any given list of knives posted.

Getting back to Petzals choices in knives.

Where does one find names like Busse, Randall, Lake, Herron, or Bark River without being a knife nut?

Names like Simonich, Wilson, Krein, Davison, Onion, Pardue, Collins, or Koster for that matter?

You are either following the industry with a serious interest, or, God forbid, you've been given freebies from industry leaders because you are the biggest mouth in the media.

Either way, opinions are influenced but that isn't always a bad thing. If his opinion was swayed by experience, bribery, or what he read on forums like this, it has brought edged tools to many that might not have put too much thought into it. Hopefully, articles like Petzals Top 20 will get readers to go beyond what they find at WalMart and bring a few more into the fray.

While I don't agree with his choices, I commend him and F&S for publishing a full bore, these-are-the-knives -you-need-to-consider article.

I'll post my top 20 tomorrow ;) .

Chris

Tom Krein
June 21, 2008, 12:55 AM
Thats what I was thinking about today aswell, what are fixed blades used for? does anybody carry one daily? Aren't they a little big to carry?

PLEASE, say it isn't so!!

Fixed blades are used for all the same tasks as a folder. I know a LOT of people that are going back to simple small fixed blades for Every Day Carry.

Fixed blades come in all different styles and sizes just like folders. There are a good many fixed blades that simply disappear into a front pocket.

Here is one of mine. Its a "Pocket Bowie" with a Paul Long pocket sheath. The sheath clips on your pocket just like a folder with a pocket clip.

http://kreinknives.net/images/PocketBowieBlueBlackPolished-62.jpg

Sorry to hijack your thread...

I found the list interesting and wouldn't argue too much with about 50% of the knives. Don't think it mentioned Scagel though...??

Tom

Rupestris
June 21, 2008, 01:06 AM
Jebus, Tom! Stop posting stuff like that! :p You're killin' me.

As for fixed Vs. folders. I assume its much like Petzals article a year or so ago on the greatest firearms ever. His article is for sportsmen. The 1911, AR-15, AK-47, BHP, and a host of other proven firearms were not on his list as they are not sporting arms.

Most sportsmen, when afield, carry a fixed blade knife. If you were to add SD, EDC, or kitchen duty to the list, it would be much more diverse. He's simply talking about hunting, fishing, camping, hiking knives.

EDIT: By the way, I carry a fixed blade almost daily. A BRK&T Woodland.

TimboKhan
June 21, 2008, 01:11 AM
I enjoyed reading the article, but you have to understand that it is written almost entirely from a sportsmans point of view. My top 20 knives list (if in fact I could even make such a list) would not include an Ulu, though I use one ever day while cooking; a Woodsmans Pal, though they have a long history of awesomeness; or the KoA Brown Bear, though it looks like a knife that I would like to own. I am not so sure that I would have included the Leatherman either, though again, I think Leathermans are a excellent tool. I mean, really it just boils down to opinion more than anything. In my opinion, a Spyderco should have been added because of the thumbhole and the revolution of one hand opening knives it started, a Case should have been added (or the Uncle Henry should have been substituted out) because it's such an incredibly popular knife. Past that, it's matter of opinion.

Looked at from another perspective, think about the "best knives" made that aren't typically used by sportsman. Not a whole lot of people strap on a loveless when they work construction, You don't see a lot of Ulu's in electricians pockets, and I don't know many Marines and Soldiers that would want to pack around the weight of a Bowie. It was an enjoyable article, but it's just Petzal's opinion.

Speaking solely on opinion, there are a lot of theories as to why the guy chose the knives he did to write about, from pimping his own collection, to ad conspiracies and so on. The one thing that's overlooked is that Petzal achieved what every writer wants: discussion on what he wrote. Don't kid yourself, Petzal probably thinks he is right in this and every article he writes, and he will likely argue his points to the death, but in the end he wants that discussion.

jhansman
June 21, 2008, 01:17 AM
Glad to see the Buck 110 made the grade. An American classic that endures.

Okiecruffler
June 21, 2008, 02:34 AM
Can't help but notice if you had each of those 20 knives and a stringer of crappie, you'd be wasting alot of good meat.

Valkman
June 21, 2008, 02:48 AM
Tom, you better get cracking if you're ever going to make that top 20! :D

LAK
June 21, 2008, 03:25 AM
I think the article was a mix of personal taste and well considered opinion.

A prime example being the Buck 110. Whether Buck was the first to make a knife of the exact type, dimensions, etc of the 110, the 110 has undoubtably been a long and very popular knife with great general utility.

Anyone else could have substituted a similar knife made by another maker with arguably better steel, blade profile etc etc.

Personally there are very few on his list I would have chosen as "best ever made".

--------------------

http://searchronpaul.com
http://ussliberty.org/oldindex.html
http://www.gtr5.com
http://ssunitedstates.org

eliphalet
June 21, 2008, 10:32 AM
Anyone else could have substituted a similar knife made by another maker with arguably better steel, blade profile etc etc.The 110's you buy today are not the 110's of yesteryear. His statement of them being made stronger or a better knife nowadays is bunk.

22-rimfire
June 21, 2008, 11:11 AM
The 110's are still made in the USA by the way.

Rupestris
June 21, 2008, 11:43 AM
The 110's you buy today are not the 110's of yesteryear. His statement of them being made stronger or a better knife nowadays is bunk.

Not completely bunk. With the advancements in manufacturing, I gotta believe knives built today can be better or stronger than knives made 30 years ago. Even the 110.

Eleven Mike
June 21, 2008, 11:54 AM
Fixed blades still see plenty of use. I carry a 4-inch drop point in my front jeans pocket every day.

The Tourist
June 21, 2008, 01:14 PM
Fixed blades...in my front jeans pocket every day.

I think this is the answer on why.

I do not believe the practice of carrying a fixed blade like a clip folder has been around very long, at least not in my area (most urban).

In fact, the first "pocket sheath" I ever had was made for me by Josh Graham. According to him (and pictures on his website) lots of his clients carry in this fashion. In fact, the side pocket on a pair of carpenters' pants or cammies would be a great place for carry. Sometimes a knife like this jams me in the top of my right thigh when I'm out riding. (So much so that I have switched over to the Graham Stubby when on my motorcycle.)

Think about it, it solves a problem we have all complained about, that being strength. From time to time everyone has complained of breakage--usually while prying--we have opined that liner locks don't hold, and there was an entire debate a few years ago that the Chinook I design wobbled leaving the factory.

I don't even think about these concerns when I carry a fixed blade designed for clip carry.

alaskanativeson
June 21, 2008, 04:42 PM
About the only problem I have with this list is the Swiss Champ. Of all the people I've personally known who've purchased one, no one actually carries them. They're too clunky. They're not as useful (in most situations) as a tool like the Leatherman.

That's not to say that an SAK doesn't belong on the list: Clearly one does. My vote would have been either for the original soldier's model or one like the Huntsman, the SAK I see carried most (maybe next to the Classic.)

JTW Jr.
June 21, 2008, 05:23 PM
wonder if he was going for a knife style list , cause if its actual knives themselves ( model & maker ) and for all time , well he is missing a whole heap of good stuff.

Small fixed blade for every day use ? absolutely ! Wouldn't be without one.

Eleven Mike
June 21, 2008, 06:37 PM
OK, I just saw the list and I must say: A Woodsman's Pal is NOT a knife. But then, neither is a Leatherman. Not to denigrate either one, but they just aren't knives.


In fact, the first "pocket sheath" I ever had was made for me by Josh Graham. According to him (and pictures on his website) lots of his clients carry in this fashion.

I'm curious to know what is a "pocket sheath." My knife was supplied with an ordinary leather pouch sheath w/ belt loop. I just attached a bit of paracord to the belt loop, with a snap-link on the other end to attach to the belt loop on my jeans. When I draw the knife, the sheath hangs up on the edge of the pocket, and the knife comes right out.

I used to carry an A.G. Russell Deer Hunter in the same mode, and it actually carried a little better. It was a simpler version of the picture below, which is just something I snagged off of Google. I had a custom piece made on the same pattern, but with 1/8" steel and prettier materials.

http://www.knifeforums.com/uploads/med_1208642902-deer_hunt00.jpg

22-rimfire
June 21, 2008, 06:40 PM
The pocket sheath rides inside the pocket like a pocket holster.

hso
June 21, 2008, 06:58 PM
Interesting choices with some interesting technical errors (KaBar was a Camillus line:scrutiny::rolleyes:). Interesting also that they didn't state their criteria for "best".

I think that it's not fair to lump customs in with production knives.

If you want to see what knifemakers think are the "best" knives ever look at the Blade Hall of Fame members for some idea.

DeTerminator
June 21, 2008, 07:37 PM
Hi Alasknativeson!

I have a Swiss Champ, and carry it every day (at least when I wear jeans; like I said, pretty much every day).

It goes into the right watch pocket, and fits pretty good there. I don't know it's there. If it went into the regular pocket, yeah, it would be like a rock. My dad has a small SAK, and when he saw mine, he nearly flipped. "That might be good for in the woods, but I don't want to carry that around all day".

Later,

Kerry

bannockburn
June 21, 2008, 09:31 PM
hso

That's pretty much what I thought; how can you do a "20 Best" list and then have some of the finest custom knife makers mixed in with factory production knives. Not to mention some rather obvious omissions of both. Sounds almost like this whole thing was set up just to stir up some controversy, and maybe sell some more magazines.

TimboKhan
June 21, 2008, 11:04 PM
Sounds almost like this whole thing was set up just to stir up some controversy, and maybe sell some more magazines

Almost nothing. As I said before, Petzal wants this kind of discussion, becasue controversy sells magazines and keeps him employed.

Before you cry foul at that idea, consider for a minute that a magazine is a business like anything else. If all F&S did was publish articles on how to track a deer across a beanfield, they wouldn't sell nearly as many magazines. By having adventure articles that are devoid of any real informative value (but darned fun to read) and opinionated columnists that aren't afraid to stir the pot, they add interest to the magazine along with new readers that could care less how to jig for smallmouth in heavy cover. I wonder how many people are going to buy this issue of F&S just to see what else is in there? It's not a conspiracy, it's just business.

Case in point, we are now on two pages of discussion about this list! I would say that Petzal accomplished his mission...

22-rimfire
June 22, 2008, 12:25 AM
I just signed up for F&S again. I'm cheap and I let my cheap subscriptions run out... then eventually I get a much better price.

A little controversy is a good thing for magazines. American Hunter has their all time best caliber lists this month. I tend to agree more with that list. But I don't agree with their rifle list. It makes for fun reading.

Browning
June 22, 2008, 02:10 PM
Well I didn't see any....

SAK's.

Scandinavian Puukko's.

Moras (cheap, but they work and they're common).

Slip Joint folding knives.

Or Fishing/Fileting knives on the list.

They got alot of the classics, but to me it's incomplete.

Pilot
June 22, 2008, 02:17 PM
Buck 119, Benchmade 710, Fallkniven F1/S1/A1.

SlamFire1
June 22, 2008, 03:14 PM
:barf:If all F&S did was publish articles on how to track a deer across a beanfield, they wouldn't sell nearly as many magazines. By having adventure articles that are devoid of any real informative value (but darned fun to read) and opinionated columnists that aren't afraid to stir the pot, they add interest to the magazine along with new readers that could care less how to jig for smallmouth in heavy cover.

Charles Askins http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Askins would do that all the time. :mad: I have seen articles of his claiming the 30-06 is obsolete, if not dead, the M1911 was a bad pistol, and then him calling Elmer Keith a liar for claiming to hit a deer at 600 yards with a 44 Mag.

It is all about the profits. :barf:

Rupestris
June 22, 2008, 03:27 PM
It is all about the profits.

Well they aren't getting a whole lot of profit out of me. A three year subscription costs me 78/month. Even if Petzal gets all of it, he's not retiring solely on my dime.

For that money I get few decent articles, maybe a laugh or two, and when I'm done with it I have a media to test edge sharpness with. I've already used this months issue to test a Swamp Rat Howling rat that I've been working on. Right now it'll take the clear clay coating off the cover without taking color with it :D .

Chris

sm
June 22, 2008, 04:19 PM
Define "best".

I was born in '55 and still have a few F&S from that year.
Robert Ruark and Cory Ford were just two of the first things read to me as wee brat.

I quit taking F&S when Bob Brister was no longer contributing editor.

In 1955 one Article was ".243 vs 6mm" and to this day that same debate is still going on, always will, as it "sells" controversy.

I find it extremely funny, the same things that went on with gun magazines, are happening with Internet.

Cycles.
New folks coming up and the same questions being asked, and the same discussions being discussed.

Some things just "are". Tap's Tips from 1955 were true before he shared them in 1955 and still hold true today.

Fact is, the person in Alaska working in the Fishing Industry is going to have a different take on "best" knives than someone in AK doing Search & Rescue, and from someone else Hunting in AK.

For sure, these "best" knives are going to vary from those selected from Mall Ninja's R Us and Armchair Q-Back Society.

I mean come on, someone could get kilt if that mustard pack in the food court at the mall is not opened with a one hand assist, with S30V and the cutie from Movie Mall is walking by...*tacky*


Best to me, for my tasks since 1955 are going to be different from best as others have used for tasks.

Then add classics, sentimental value, and other factors.

i.e. Hen & Rooster Bertram era. Douk-Douk, Rapela fillet knives, Opinels, SAK Classic, Christy Knife and...Advertising knives.

Yep, even the Purina advertising knife, free, is a "best" knife in my book.


What we need is Cory Ford, Robert Ruark, Brister and Tap passing on as they did.
Oh they sold magazines, heck a kid, boy or girl, from young to age 100 could not wait to open F&S and see what all that issue what chocked full of.

I forget what knife Corey said he liked, and Ruark too, but I recall what Ernest Hemingway preferred and Chuck Yeager when he went for Golden Trout.

It was the person, not the tool, be it gun or knife that was made these folks "best" at what they did and passed forward.

One more thing...

If you can read Cory Ford and not shed a tear, something is seriously wrong with you.

eliphalet
June 23, 2008, 12:10 AM
For the most part lists are some city guy writers interpretation of what is best not what really is. If you really wanna know what is best ask the guys that uses it everyday, gun, knife, tool, or what have you, or what has lasted through the test of time, not what some writer says in a magazine for sure.

SM, don't forget Ted Trueblood, one of my favorites, but then maybe I am predigest as he lived very close to here, where I was born, spent time, always longed to be, but as a kid I was mostly stuck hundreds of miles away.

The Tourist
June 23, 2008, 12:35 AM
For the most part lists are some city guy writers interpretation of what is best not what really is.

For many products, you are absolutely correct. Sometimes the "beautiful people" move in on something and make it the "in" activity. After all, why do celebrities converge on Aspen? For the skiing? Of course not, it's the place to be seen.

Do you think Hummers are popular because Arnold Schwarzenegger and Goldie Hawn bought the first two that were made available to the public? Of course not, it's an old well established idea.

The nazi officers needed a convenient way to move Eva Braun around Germany in places where there were no rail lines. They asked Mercedes to build them a car capable of their needs. The designers built a roadster with two separate transmissions that once hit 150 MPH. The designer developed a reputation on building the finest cars, they became popular among the elite, bada bing, bada boom...

If I ever became the toast of the town and my picture was taken with a Tussey pistol and a Graham knife, within weeks, every geek who fancies himself to be an "operator" would buy them at inflated prices.

After all, novels aren't really popular until Oprah reads them. Heaven forbid she ever starts posting here at THR. Paris Hilton will tie up all of our bandwidth.

sm
June 23, 2008, 01:31 AM
SM, don't forget Ted Trueblood, one of my favorites, but then maybe I am predigest as he lived very close to here, where I was born, spent time, always longed to be, but as a kid I was mostly stuck hundreds of miles away.

Ted Trueblood,

Yep, another great example!

Here is what is funny about people and the power of suggestion through such input mediums as magazines.

Folks read about a hunting, or fishing trip in Field & Stream.
Now the person might be Robert Ruark, or President Eisenhower as these are two examples from 1955 Field & Stream magazine issues.

Ike, is shown fishing for Trout, and even shares his recipe for preparing stream side trout.

Ruark, is shown with a Piranha attached to his long sleeve shirt!

Now some reader, most often a kid, sees the advertising and the advertising section in the back.

Start your own Chinchilla farm and get rich!

Underneath is some ad for a knife with a compass, saw back, and inside the handle is fishing line, hooks and whatever else and this "Survival Knife" .

So of course some readers attach this "survival knife" to the articles about Ruark and Ike.

If we had had Internet in 1955 , the forums would have such threads as:

What gun for Mutant Chichchilla?

6mm vs .243 for Chinchilla?

Webley vs Enfield for Mutant Piranha ?

*snicker*

I know Chuck Yeager used a SAK Executive when he went on his famous Golden Trout fishing trips, he shared that in his books.

Curt Gowdy I best recall used a Gerber LST in the field ( correct me if my memory failed).

President Eisenhower favored a Case pen knife, which is often referred to as
Eisenhower, and I want to say I recall reading where he actually carried and used these while out and about, including when tying fly's and cleaning and cooking trout.

Hemingway carried a folding knife with a corkscrew.

Trueblood, if memory serves me right, liked Western fixed blades.

My point is, many of the real deal heros of yesteryear did not use a bunch of knives, instead simple knives, and stayed with the same simple knife and did not change every time the wind blew.

Now I really want to know what pocket knife Ruark carried.
My gut said it was akin to Hemingway's.

I believe I read while in Africa, he often used the same simple fixed blades the locals did.

None carried the "survival knife" as in the advertising...

The more things change, the more they remain the same.

Folks still carry simple knives that really do use a knife.
Folks still buy stuff because of controversy and advertising seen in magazines.

All I gotta do is hand a Special Forces, or Army Ranger , or Team Seal a single shot shotgun, and a SAK Classic and take a picture and "advertise"

Single shot shotgun and SAK Classic were the tools in hand of real deal operators.

Single shot shotguns and Classics would fly off the shelves the next day.

*yep*

Rupestris
June 23, 2008, 08:50 AM
I received the latest issue (7/08) of F&S on Friday. The contributor of the month is Dave Petzal. There's a short bio of him with some stats attached. Not that they mean anything but I thought somer were interesting.

Years Hunting 54
Highest score on IQ test - 144
Number of cats owned - 19
Number of guns he has owned - 250
Number or knives he has owned - 1000
Number of rounds he has shot in his lifetime - 250,000

I'm not sure where I'd put 1000 knives. My collection is what I'd call modest. Maybe 45 knives if I include a couple of my favorite kitchen knives. Of those, I'd say 5 are heirlooms. Not worth a dime in most cases but they were dads, grandpas, and even grandmas. Of the remaining knives, I'd say half of them are put asside for my kids. Nice knives that are no longer available that they will (I hope) use and appreciate. Even pass down to their grandkids.

Personally, I think Petzal should sell off about 900 of those knives and use the money to increase his round count. Get a shotgun and a .22 and try to get that number into the 7-digit range :D . I know I'd be there if F&S was footin' the bill. :p

Chris

TimboKhan
June 23, 2008, 11:02 AM
Well I didn't see any....

SAK's.

Scandinavian Puukko's.

Moras (cheap, but they work and they're common).

Slip Joint folding knives.

Or Fishing/Fileting knives on the list.

They got alot of the classics, but to me it's incomplete.

There were no fillet knives, but there was a SAK:
http://www.fieldandstream.com/article_gallery/The-20-Best-Knives-Ever-Made/13

There wasn't a Pukko or a Mora specifically, but the Leuku pays tribute to that vein of knives:
http://www.fieldandstream.com/article_gallery/The-20-Best-Knives-Ever-Made/5

Unless I am missing something, the Uncle Henry is a slip-joint knife:
http://www.fieldandstream.com/article_gallery/The-20-Best-Knives-Ever-Made/12

I have seen articles of his claiming the 30-06 is obsolete, if not dead, the M1911 was a bad pistol, and then him calling Elmer Keith a liar for claiming to hit a deer at 600 yards with a 44 Mag.


You puke, but you remember those articles, right? I have seen at least one of the articles in which he says that auto pistols are crap, and that article was specifically written to raise the hackles. Controversy sells magazines and stimulates discussion. Hell, if you read Craig Boddington's articles in G&A, you would think that each individual species of animal requires a specific cartridge to effectively slay. I would also add that Haskins wasn't the only person to question if Elmer Keith hit that deer, and there are plenty of writers that debate to this day about how ethical that shot really was.

It's also worth noting that in the comments, it's pretty clear that there is a wide range of disagreement as to what the top 20 knives were. One guy even says that the Glock Field Knife should be on the list.

kBob
June 23, 2008, 12:36 PM
During the 1970's and early 80's THE most common non issue knife found on the belt of US Infantrymen was the Buck 112 "Ranger".

The little black leather pouch was some how invisable to anti privately owned weapons crowd. Commonly AIiborne or 'skeeterwings were pinned to the flap and occassionaly medics badges or the pin portion of weapons qualificarion badges.

The squarer/bulkier grip/body (than the scelt 110) of the 112 was easy to hang on to when wet or when wearing gloves or mittens.

I saw them used as pry bars, wire cutters and even can openners (P38 Shellby tool worked better for that though) Dressing out small game ('rad will never miss a few Hasen here or there), splitting up ammo crates for kinding, slicing 1000Kg test repel line, used as a hammer, and for whittling whether to make useful camp accessories or to blow off time while waiting.

They occasionally got used as a fighting knife. The guys were constantly trying to come up with new one handed opening techniques.

Never hear zipp about them from the x-spurts.

Technology has moved on, but they are still great little folders.

-Bob Hollingsworth

HoosierQ
June 23, 2008, 02:45 PM
Kind of surprised not to see Puma on the list. I would have put it in place of the Leatherman (great tool...not really a knife though).

I'd swap out the Woodsman's pal for the best machete ever made...the Collins Legitimus! I have two.

Browning
June 23, 2008, 02:56 PM
TK: Doesn't that mean it's incomplete then since it doesn't list them by name?

A Leuku isn't a Puukko or a Mora.

It's Scandinavian to be sure, but that's not the same thing.

rcmodel
June 23, 2008, 03:33 PM
Maybe not the best, but certainly memorable, and trend-setters for their time:
1920's & 30's = Marbles Woodcraft.
1940's - WWII = Navy MKII (Kabar by Camillus) Randall #1 Fighter.
1950's = Stanley 99 Retractable Utility Knife.
1960's - Vietnam = Buck 110. Gerber MKII.
1970's = Spyderco Delica. (and all other one-hand openers with pocket clips that came after them) Loveless Drop-Point.
1980's = Emerson Tanto. Any number of custom makers.
1990's = Any number of factory made custom maker designs.

Others you have to include would be the Victronox Swiss Army knife, and the Rapala fillet knife.

rcmodel

TimboKhan
June 23, 2008, 03:34 PM
Well, like I say, the Leuku sort of pays tribute to that type of knife. Plus, I don't know that you would list all three on a 20 greatest knife list. Are they really so different as to be deserving of individual placement? I personally would say no, but I do agree that at least one Scandanavian knife should be on any great knives list.

ScottyT
June 23, 2008, 03:49 PM
Though my field knife didn't make the list (the SOG Seal Pup), I really enjoyed that little article. Thanks for the post.

ImARugerFan
June 23, 2008, 04:20 PM
I thought it was funny that the author said he isn't a fan of folding knives because they tend not to be big enough for hunting. How big of a knife do you need to dress a deer? I usually find a 4" blade is about the biggest I would want to use, although I have used bigger ones, they're just not ideal.

MISTER MOON
June 23, 2008, 05:17 PM
This one should appear in first place ...

Mister Moon for WWW.M9M4.COM

Valkman
June 23, 2008, 05:46 PM
I agree that there should be a "best of" for customs and productions. A list with Loveless and Leatherman both in it is ridiculous. I guarantee SAK and Leatherman tools get much more use than Loveless knives, because at $3500 and up any use of Bob's knives stopped long ago. Now they are museum pieces, even what few new ones appear.

Omaha-BeenGlockin
June 23, 2008, 08:32 PM
No mention of Spyderco or the BM Axis lock loses big points in credibility.

LAK
June 27, 2008, 05:18 AM
RE: the Buck 110. When I mentioned the Buck 110 it was more in the context of a knife of somewhat generic type and design. Sort of like the Randall model 7 - everyone makes one (roughly the same), with differences mainly of exact blade length, profile, materials and handle/guard types.

Just offhand, my picks for the 20 "best" knives ever made would start with the standard kitchen paring, utility or "petty" knife. My pick is the Kikuichi 4" damascus steel with "western style" ebony handle.

And like the example of the Buck 110, many people might pick a similar knife to the Kikuichi; different maker, minor blade difference, blade steel, handle etc being of the opinion it is better than the others.

Mongrel
July 1, 2008, 12:18 AM
There is 'useful' and there is 'controversial' or 'provocative'.

Definately falls in the category of the latter.

A useful article would simply give a description and examples of the best knife patterns and types. A step further and we could reflect specific uses. A third article might show the evolution of steels used and how that may impact your choice depending on need.

The article seems to be indicative of our current culture. Years ago we would consider ourselves lucky (or blessed) to have ONE good knife. Today we are choking on good knives and still not satisfied.

I've mulled it over enough to convince myself that I could get by on:

18" Ontario Military Machete
good short saw
Kabar
4" folder
Leatherman type tool
small three bladed slipjoint
scalpel blade in the first aid kit
good whetstone
small bastard file
oil (hahah)

Add to that a small axe and an entrenching tool, and you could tame the West. Oh, and please make them all in 'old fashioned' American carbon steel.

Honestly, if I couldn't get it done with that list-all hope is lost.

LAK
July 1, 2008, 04:02 AM
The article seems to be indicative of our current culture. Years ago we would consider ourselves lucky (or blessed) to have ONE good knife. Today we are choking on good knives and still not satisfied.
Very true; and this could be applied to other items. The question is not so much which can be proclaimed the absolute best, than how long will it take to pick a few from the literally hundreds of very good to excellent available.

T.R.
July 1, 2008, 02:22 PM
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/coldsteel.jpg

I've had great luck with common knives such as Schrade, Camillus, Buck, Ka Bar, and others. But this new (to me) COLD STEEL knife with Carbon V steel is likely to become as favorite. Size, weight, shape: all perfect for wilderness and rough country hunts. This older model was made in USA.

TR

Mongrel
July 1, 2008, 06:30 PM
ahh...the Cold Steel SRK!

Never owned one but have handled them and been impressed. As you said, it's a great combination of size, weight, and blade shape. A very utilitarian piece indeed.

My disease has come full circle over the last several years. After lusting after blades of all shapes, sizes, and especially high prices, I have contented myself with one or two knives made by John Greco and a few 'over the counter' pieces.

When I realized that 'I' a committed K.I.S.S. (and cheap) disciple had started to become a collector and not a 'user' I made a decision to let the collection go (not quite finished yet with that) and start enjoying actually using knives I could afford.

Anyway-the SRK is a great choice in my opinion.

JShirley
July 1, 2008, 06:59 PM
Some serious blade folks have reprofiled the SRK, cause, while tough, the edge is darned thick.

thegoodfight
July 1, 2008, 07:10 PM
I REALLY like the newer zero tolerance line of knives. I love cheap knives like SAKs and Moras too. I've never been a big fan of Chris Reeve. The steel they use is extremely brittle. Of course I love busse and rangers knives, swamp rats etc.

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