What is the deal with the Dash for S & Ws


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Old School
July 8, 2008, 07:59 PM
I have seen several threads where people refer to pistols as "no dash" models. What is the significance of this?

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Thernlund
July 8, 2008, 08:04 PM
Dashes are revisions on the original. A "no-dash" model would signify a "first edition", or "first generation".


-T.

Old School
July 8, 2008, 08:39 PM
Thanx Thernlund,
Does S&W or any other source have a webpage that details any feature differences?

Thernlund
July 8, 2008, 08:41 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Standard-Catalog-Smith-Wesson-Supica/dp/0873492722

Not a web page, but it's the most definitive.

Wikipedia might also be some help. I don't really know of any other sources.


-T.

csmkersh
July 8, 2008, 08:44 PM
Here's another data source.

http://www.handloads.com/misc/Smith.Model.Changes.asp

Matt-J2
July 8, 2008, 10:42 PM
It's a secret code amongst S&W owners. It helps all of them feel superior to non-S&W owners, and amongst each other it's a ranking system, secret handshake, and ice cream sundae ticket all rolled into one.

metrotps
July 8, 2008, 10:54 PM
Prior to 1957, S&W handguns did not have model numbers (hence, the term Pre-Model 29 for example). In 1957, all existing models were assigned a model number, as were new guns as they were introduced. As engineering changes were made the company stamped the frame of each revolver with the model number and a -1, -2, -3, etc. to show the change was implemented on that paraticular gun. For example, the Model 27 became the Model 27-1 when the threads on the extractor rod were changed from right-hand to left-hand to reduce the chance of the rod loosening from recoil, and this model became the 27-2 when the new cylinder stop was implemented with the elimination of the cylinder stop plunger screw.

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