45 acp question


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Newby101
July 13, 2008, 08:08 PM
I have been reading and trying to understand the differences between the different 45 acp 's

This is what I have been looking at for purchasing bulk, http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0022868215171a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&QueryText=45+acp&N=4887&Ntk=Products&Ntx=mode+matchall&Nty=1&Ntt=45+acp&noImage=0

Is the fMJ worth the difference in $$ quality / ability vrs cost ?

compared to the LRH ?

What questions should I be asking?

I am new , Go figure..

This is for a Taurus 24/7 45 acp


I purchased Remington UMC 45 Automatic 185 gr MC

Is there a difinitive web site or thread that is basic knowledge with out brand loyality or opinions, rather technical information with regards to the types and descriptors of the Ammos?

As a Gunners Mate I wasn't concerned with what went into the weapon as much as it being operable and clean.

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dispatch
July 13, 2008, 09:06 PM
My opinion- 230 grain hard ball (Full Metal Jacket) is as good as it gets. Reliable and a proven manstopper. Keep it simple.

huff
July 13, 2008, 11:19 PM
Go to Wally world and get FMJ for 30 bucks for a box of 100 WWB, for now.

dmazur
July 13, 2008, 11:29 PM
Well, this isn't really opinion, but rather suggestions of things you can check further -

Some indoor ranges don't allow unjacketed lead bullets. I believe Rainier or Berry's are OK, which are copper plated rather than copper jacketed. (Cheaper) The concern is air quality, lead particles. Not a concern if you shoot at outdoor ranges or gravel pits exclusively.

Other than that, I'm not sure standard velocity loads for .45ACP have much of a tendency to cause leading of the barrel. (The reason for gas checks on cast lead bullets pushed at higher velocities.) Possibly a concern.

The bulk loaded anythings have possible concerns of consistency of loads, so you can run some through a chronograph to remove this worry, or measure extreme spread and guess how it's going to affect accuracy.

poet
July 13, 2008, 11:31 PM
Winchester White box at Walmart is probably the best bargain for brand names, its on the dirty side though.

HisSoldier
July 14, 2008, 12:02 AM
I've never seen the designation LRH, what is that? When I used to roll my own I was constantly trying to get lead out of the rifling grooves. A lot has changed for me since then, I long ago realized that my time is way too valuable to mess with that kind of thing. Of course I may have been using too soft an alloy, but if I remember right it was 30% tin and lubed in a Lyman lube press using the Lyman lube stick. It would be fun to at least have the capability again to make and load my own bullets. The TMJ (Total Metal Jacket) bullets I buy in factory reloads from Outdoor Marksman are plated about .008" thick, and the only time the lead shows is after they splash against a gong. Same price as FMJ, and I don't really know if it matters. I think the FMJ resists deformation a bit better?

dmazur
July 14, 2008, 12:17 AM
I've never seen the designation LRH, what is that?

The Cabela's ad shows LRN (lead round nose), so I think the H is a typo...

If the new shooter isn't reloading yet, I don't know if plated bullets are available. I think they are, and slightly cheaper than FMJ with true jackets.

Wildfire
July 14, 2008, 12:19 AM
Hey there:
Some of the outdoor ranges will not allow FMJ to be used on certian ranges, Steel targets etc.... Some indoor ranges will not allow the use of all lead rounds, feraing some sort of lead poision issues.

Casting or Rolling your own may not be worth the cost and time it will take to get going. Besides 30% tin made those bullets softer not harder.
Any thing over 5 to 8% or in that range will cause cast lead to soften, Not harden.

Good wheel weight lead can work for most 45ACP shooting. Magum alloys are not cheap but are the best mix for the leading problem. I have fire'd many thousands of rounds in IPSC shooting with the mag alloys and never had leading issues that would cause problems . Leading will always be there in useing a lead round.

Finding out about the range rules will help. if you can shoot out back or somewhere none of this matters , then just go for it. And have fun....

1911Tuner
July 14, 2008, 05:57 AM
Slightly off-topic for a minute...

When I used to roll my own I was constantly trying to get lead out of the rifling grooves. Of course I may have been using too soft an alloy.

Actually, it was probably because the alloy was too hard, and/or the bullets were too small. Lead fouling doesn't come from friction. It comes from gas cutting along the sides of the bullet. Softer bullets that are correctly sized bump up and create a better seal in the bore.

I cast mine quite a bit softer than most commercial alloys, and get zero lead fouling beyond a light wash that removes easily with a dry, oversized bronze brush, even in top-end .357 and .41 Magnum loadings.

I use 50/50 wire solder with wheelweight alloy in a ratio of about 45:1 for pistol bullets. Some moulds like 35 or 40:1 for better fillout.

Hard commercial lube doesn't help, either. A softer lube goes a long way toward keeping the heavy fouling at bay. Lennox markets a good 50/50 solder...but it may not be available for much longer. The plumbing supply houses are moving away from lead solder, but they'll probably order it if you're willing to buy 50 rolls at a time.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled programming.

mpmarty
July 14, 2008, 01:10 PM
I've been casting my own 45cal and 30cal bullets for nearly fifty years. Since starting to use the LEE liquid alox tumble lube I have had no leading at all using straight wheel weights in 45acp. In the 30cal I cast 175gr gas check bullets and up to about 2200fps the wheel weights work fine beyond that I use linotype, gas checks and liquid alox. I recently began shooting my cast 170gr 10mm in my 10mm pistols over max charges of #9 and Power Pistol, no leading with wheel weights and liquid alox. you might want to do a bit of research and reading on shooting cast bullets as the prior poster points out, sometimes a too hard alloy is worse than too soft. This is particularly true in revolvers where the chamber mouth may size a bullet down smaller than the groove diameter, hitting the forcing cone will "bump up" a softer bullet to fill the bore better.

GunDoctor
July 14, 2008, 01:12 PM
I would also go with the FMJ

Rinspeed
July 14, 2008, 01:40 PM
Welcome to THR Newby101.

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