Rattling inside S&W 28-Not the Hammer Block


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zplug123
July 14, 2008, 08:55 PM
Just got my Model 28 ('74-'77 manufacture) back from the store after they looked at a unrelated problem (binding cylinder=carbon buildup) and for the first time I noticed a distinct rattling noise inside the works. Opened up the sideplate carefully and discovered it still existed after removing the hammer block, visual inspection shows everything is still functioning and solid, so I'd have to removed the internals before finding the culprit...

Should I retreat and forget about it, or is there an easier solution?

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earplug
July 14, 2008, 09:12 PM
The factory put in a little steel rod inside the rebound spring. This is the part that pushes the trigger back after you release the trigger. The rod acts like a trigger over travel stop. This might be your rattle.

machinisttx
July 14, 2008, 09:16 PM
The factory put in a little steel rod inside the rebound spring. This is the part that pushes the trigger back after you release the trigger. The rod acts like a trigger over travel stop. This might be your rattle.

I've heard of those being used on newer S&W revolvers, but I have yet to encounter an older one that had one in it.

zplug123
July 14, 2008, 09:25 PM
The funny thing is, I've got another Model 28 that's about a decade older (1966), no funny noises at all. So perhaps I should compare the innards?

Big B
July 14, 2008, 11:03 PM
My model 28-2, 1980, has the same rattle. I can't figure out where it's coming from, but it doesn't seem to affect it's performance. The gun is tight feeling, and is in great mechanical shape.

zplug123
July 14, 2008, 11:44 PM
Still annoying nonetheless, how am I suppose to carry this monster of a revolver without sounding like maracas? -_-

Joking, but I still have that warm fuzzy feeling...seeing as how I've got two of these great pieces and am planning for a dual carry shoulder holster set-up. For field work, of course >_>

Oro
July 14, 2008, 11:57 PM
..seeing as how I've got two of these great pieces and am planning for a dual carry shoulder holster set-up. For field work, of course

I like your attitude. I'm trying to come up with a shoulder design that let's me carry a 3.5" 27 on one side and my 629 3" on the other. I find when I'm "in the field" I switch between one gun one day and another the next. Why not just take both?

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd275/kamerer/S-W/IMGP2536.jpg

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd275/kamerer/S-W/27-2/IMGP2975-1.jpg

zplug123
July 15, 2008, 01:13 AM
Well at the moment I've got a nylon shoulder holster, seeing as how leather empties the wallet much faster. Plus, for having a small build, I find that carrying a 6" requires some counterbalance, otherwise I've got a drooping carry no matter how much I adjust it.

Working on my 'New York reload' wouldn't be such a bad idea either:neener:

Oro
July 15, 2008, 01:45 AM
Again, I like your attitude. A New York reload is my preferred method, too!

here is a rig I carry a 6.5" N frame in. It's old and I got it for like $30 at a gun show. But the key thing is the cross-body strap, that helps the droop and the stability on longer barrels (ont he gund) or smaller frames (of the person). I carry this .455 with .45 LC in it sometimes when not in grizzly country (which we only have a small amount of).

Another option, not as cheap, is the "Doc Holliday" rig from El Paso. It slings it down low, almost cross-draw fashion, with a stabilizing belt around above the waist. Very low, stable, etc. Not cheap, but very nice.

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd275/kamerer/S-W/455%20HE/IMGP2506.jpg

rcmodel
July 15, 2008, 12:31 PM
I've heard of those being used on newer S&W revolvers, but I have yet to encounter an older one that had one in it.Actually, I think it was the other way around.
The trigger stop pin was used in the higher grade Magnums & Target guns back in the 50's & 60's?

Early 19's even had them for awhile. But it was found they could bind the gun up in fast DA fire, and they were done away with throughout the line.
Most knowledgeable revolver folks had them removed on duty & SD guns.

I don't think the 28 Highway Patrolman ever had them, as it was an "economy" version of the 27 and that was one cost cutting step they took.

However, that is not to say someone didn't put one in your gun at some point in an effort to improve their Bullseye scores.

Anyway, that, and the hammer block are the only two things I can think of inside a S&W revolver that could be loose enough that they could rattle, and still have a working gun.

rcmodel

Hawk
July 15, 2008, 01:32 PM
There was a little steel rod that came sliding out of the rebound slide spring when I opened up my 28-2. It's a 1977 according to the dealer - I'll check it now that I've got my spanky new copy of Standard Catalog but that's what the dealer was using - 1977 is probably correct.

I had the Jerry Miculek DVD running in front of me while I was disassembling the thing and didn't notice the rod in the model 10 starring in the production. I didn't know what it was but it wasn't hurting anything so back in she went.

I believe I'm the first one into the innards of the thing but that would appear to be unprovable. I doubt anybody had put the thing in to make it into a bullseye gun as it would have been the only thing done along those lines.

One thing stands out in my memory from the Kuhnhausen manual (shhh - don't let Fuff know I'm actually reading it) and that was that the screw type trigger stop sucked out loud. Kuhnhausen's writings don't generally betray much in the way of personal likes and dislikes but I'd submit that other trigger stop as an exception.

I didn't know what it was or notice that it made a noise when one shook the revolver fore and aft until this thread. Now I hear it but I can't say I'm much troubled by it. I don't notice it dry-firing and sure as dickens don't notice it when non-dry firing it. I'm still new to all this revolver stuff but if it's a trigger stop it isn't much of one - there's plenty of travel on that puppy.

Seems pretty harmless in any event. My uneducated wager was that it was original equipment in my 28-2. Guess I'll go home and shake my 27-2 just for grins now.

rcmodel
July 15, 2008, 01:36 PM
My take on the S&W rattle is, if you can still hear that good, you haven't been shooting .357's nearly enough! :D

rcmodel

Hawk
July 15, 2008, 02:22 PM
I have no doubt whatsoever that I'd have gone to my grave without knowing about that rattle had I not:

1. stumbled across this thread - on the same day that
2. I had the 28-2 in the range bag.

Agreed - some people must have better hearing than I do.

zplug123
July 15, 2008, 07:27 PM
Seeing as how it's not just in my head, I've just decided to give the insides a quick wipe down and replaced the sideplate. Other then that, nothing like the heft and intrinsic power of a High Patrolman...doubled

If I keep my earplugs on, then the rattling problem is solved ;)

Hawk
July 15, 2008, 08:05 PM
And I've been given a whole new type of S&W arcana to track down and ponder over. Probably a smidgen dangerous as the basics have yet to yield to my edumacation.

Honesty compels me to note that I had guessed the thing to be something to inhibit the rebound slide spring from kinking up - along the lines of a 1911 guide rod.

Not even close...
:o

The only thing I can offer in my feeble defense is that the part in question is about as sorry an excuse for a trigger overtravel adjustment as I've ever seen. Had I not seen it explained here I would not have believed it, much less guessed it.

Maybe I need to go back to my mutant 1911s for a week or two...

earplug
July 15, 2008, 11:49 PM
After you pick up your 1911 brass, you can ponder moon clips and why all wheel guns arn't made for them.

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