Interesting article


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Tomahawk674
July 17, 2008, 01:11 AM
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BTT/is_173_29/ai_n7578405/pg_1?tag=artBody;col1

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Voodoochile
July 17, 2008, 05:29 AM
I've seen that article about a year or so ago, it just gives you more respect for those old loadings that is conciddered obsolete by todays standards.

Loyalist Dave
July 17, 2008, 08:47 AM
Pretty neat test, BUT unless he went and had custom 1" boards milled, his boards were only 3/4" thick. (1 x 4 is really .75 x 3.5) So, the .31 penetrated a bit beyond 1.5", the .36 went a bit beyond 2.15", the .44 Army went through 3" of pine, and the Russian or S&W round went through 3.75" etc etc.

Not that I'd refute BP revolvers would do the job, and mine is amazingly accurate..., just his "test" was a bit scewed.

LD

Tomahawk674
July 17, 2008, 11:27 AM
Hmm, I wonder if there's a ballistic gelatin test around the net somewhere... *Googling*

scrat
July 17, 2008, 05:27 PM
wow that is some good reading just got finished with it. awesome

mykeal
July 17, 2008, 05:41 PM
Rough sawn 1" pine lumber is easy to get. Any sawmill produces it daily. Custom work is not necessary.

barneyrw
July 18, 2008, 01:02 AM
<<"Butler says the U.S. Army's 1874 Ordnance Manual listed ballistics for the .45 S&W cartridge as fired in the Colt Single Action Army revolver--which, incidentally, had just been adopted for cavalry service. That manual said the load launched a 230 grain bullet from a 7.5" barrel at 730 fps,">>

What did they measure that velocity with back then, a pocket watch?

Tomahawk674
July 18, 2008, 01:17 AM
excellent question! Now let's see who comes up with an answer...

ojh
July 18, 2008, 05:37 PM
What did they measure that velocity with back then, a pocket watch?

Most likely with a ballistic pendulum, which was invented in 1742. There were other methods too: shooting through rotating paper disks, or through fine wire meshes that start and stop an electromechanical clock. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballistic_pendulum .

barneyrw
July 18, 2008, 10:55 PM
<<"Most likely with a ballistic pendulum, which was invented in 1742. There were other methods too: shooting through rotating paper disks, or through fine wire meshes that start and stop an electromechanical clock.">>

That's really amazing.

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