cheness cutlery


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snow
July 19, 2008, 10:02 PM
I am looking at a kokatana from cheness cutlery for a begginer sword for learning, fun and backup self defense should the need arise. It will mostly be used for learning how to use a sword and cutting small limbs in the backyard occassionally and serve double duty by the bedside as a backup weapon. I do not want to spend an arm and a leg for learning and something that will possibly get confiscated if ever have touse in a self defense situation. Is this company any good, reputable, have good quality for what I want?

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TimboKhan
July 19, 2008, 10:20 PM
I don't know that I have ever heard someone say they are getting a sword for self-defense and cutting small tree-limbs. Interesting.

snow
July 19, 2008, 10:37 PM
the limb part will be for amusement only rarely, for instance after I have practiced and gotten used to handling the weapon I might lob off a couple of small branches. No real wood chopping,, I save that for my CS kukri machete, the 18 dollar one.

MadMercS55
July 21, 2008, 02:37 PM
I would recommend something along the lines of a Robert Criswell Katana for tree work, they were designed for such applications. I would keep a traditional style Katana for traditional targets and iaido practice. That being said, I've handled a few Cheness pieces and they were all nice quality. Any well made sword would work for self defense so long as you get the training to go with it. Same can be said of the Khukri as well. In practical application, if you plan to use a sword indoors, you might want something shorter than a Katana. Think along the lines of a Wakizashi or similar.

hso
July 21, 2008, 05:08 PM
snow,

You don't lop off tree limbs for amusement with even an entry level katana. They're not designed for that. You'll probably get hurt doing it. Bad idea.

OTOH, if you want to have some fun get a mat roll stand and learn to cut tameshigiri.

As to a katana as a "backup weapon", again not a good choice. The katana is usually too long to swing in the confines of a home. The hallways and cluttered furnishings of the rooms restrict movement. Look at all the threads we've had about using blades in the home and you'll eventually see that. Try cutting a pole the length of the katana and see if you have room to work with it in the house. You'll probably find you don't.

Cool idea, but not very practical in practice.

wheelgunslinger
July 21, 2008, 06:40 PM
Please, if you haven't yet, go to swordforums and read the Public Service Announcement stickied at the top.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
July 22, 2008, 12:20 AM
Can't say that I agree with a lot of stuff here..... :p

You don't lop off tree limbs for amusement with even an entry level katana. They're not designed for that. You'll probably get hurt doing it. Bad idea.

That you would use a Katana for "limbs in the back yard" suggests that you're not ready.

Cheness swords are fully functional - they're designed for cutting and cut they will and do - limbs are no exception and are fine medium to test. You'll hurt yourself if you're stupid; you won't if you're not. This is true whether cutting limbs, tameshigiri, or riding your bicycle down the street. But OK, point taken if it were a cheap decorative sword - would be good advice in that event.

http://www.chenessinc.com/

These are serious instruments properly forged and heat-treated. Serious enough for serious backyard fun, of any type of the owner's choosing.

As to a katana as a "backup weapon", again not a good choice. The katana is usually too long to swing in the confines of a home.

Well, yes and no - he said "Ko-katana". The Ko-katana or chisa-katana is the short one - wakizashi length, with katana 2H handle. 21" in the case of Cheness products. I have the Cheness 9260 Ko-katana and consider it an excellent home CQB weapon. Well, let's say "very good". A gun is "excellent".

Ko-katanas:

http://www.chenessinc.com/ko-katana.htm

Videos of sword dudes cutting all manner of limbs among other things while testing Cheness and other brand swords (with no ill effects - to themselves):

http://www.sword-buyers-guide.com/authentic-japanese-swords.html

In particular, look at the testing of the "Tenchi":

http://www.sword-buyers-guide.com/tenchi.html

Scroll down to the video.

The "Shura" and "Tenchi" Ko-katanas in 9260, through-hardened, are super tough and sharp instruments - the Chenesses are cheaper because they're not as authentic and decorative as other Japanese swords, in the small parts used.

hso
July 22, 2008, 11:31 AM
The waki length blade would fit a modern western home layout much better. Thanks for pointing the differences of the ko-katana out.

I'm still skeptical of the idea of using a japanese style blade for whacking limbs, but it looks like the 9260 blades can withstand this type of abuse. I'd be concerned about bending the blade more than injuring yourself (although a bad stroke ending with the blade embedded in the shin can happen even with a cheap blade).

wheelgunslinger
July 22, 2008, 11:57 AM
blade embedded in the shin
Ouch! You might make one of the ER staff's christmas party stories with that one...

Wouldn't something like a Gladius or short sword be better than a japanese blade for Home Defense?
just curious...

snow
July 22, 2008, 12:00 PM
I thank everyone for the input. I think I am going to give Cheness cutlery a try. I will get the Kokatana in the 9260 steel simply because I am a begginer and need the extra toughness while learning. Over time and after practice I will probably upgrade to a nicer, yet still functional show version to put over the fireplace. With that being said and note that I am no expert whatsoever but if I am reasoning correctly I feel that while the Japanese did not intend on the katana or their swords to be used as axes or brush clearing tools I do feel that many would have been used to cut bamboo, rope, to build temporary shelters and must have hit many of bones, and withstand coming into contact with the wooden handles of other weapons such as the pole axe, spear, javelin in the heat of battle. If a sword won't take cutting a few small limbs (less than 2in in diameter) it is not trustworthy as a battle or self defense weapon anyway. So while I do understand that limb cutting is not what these weapons were made for I do feel limited use on appropriate size is a good measurement to test the quality of the tool intened for use as a self defense weapon. For instance if it won't cut an 1" to 2" limb without damage, what good is it going to do against a 250lb heavily clothed intruder who is hyped up on crack or meth.

auschip
July 22, 2008, 12:07 PM
I still think it would be prudent to look for some training before you start wacking stuff in the yard. Maybe pick up a boken to practice some basic cuts before playing with a sharp blade.

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