ever get flamed for carrying a revolver?


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docmagnum357
July 25, 2008, 10:25 PM
I recently found another internet site that talks a lot about guns. It seems that there is only one bright and shining path over there to bliss when it comes to a carry gun. And it is not an "N" frame smith. or even a k frame. Apparently, they believe in shooting without aiming, and running around shooting at people while they are running from them and trying to get away from them or trying to attack someone else or something. I am not real sure what is going on over there, but I am sure I don't get it, and I am sure that they are sure that I don't get it.

Statistically, there a less than three shots exchanged in a gunfight. I dare not bring that up over there, but it is a fact. Statistics on where someone was hit, and how fast they went down are not available to civillians like us, but if they were, I am sure they would bear out that accuracy, particularly with the first shot or two, generally carries the day. Power is a distant, but important second. Capacity just doesn't concern me that much. I know that if I was hit, particularly with a powerful gun, I would get out of Dodge, if I could. While it might or might not be ethical to shoot someone in the back while they are running away, I am sure it would be legally questionable, even in an enlightened place like west Texas. Here in North Carolina, The law says that force must not be greater than nessesary to stop a deadly assault. In other words, don't shoot them in the back. If someone will stand and take five 44 magnums, or even 357 magnums, I am likely to use number six on myself.

I find revolvers easier to draw, easier to get a first hit with, easier to point shoot, more accurate, and safer for most people. I wonder if there are statistics showing how many officers or concealed carry permit holders were actually killed with an empty gun in their hand? And if they were killed while reloading, how many of their first five or six rounds found the mark at all, much less the vitals? I am really serious here, not just trying to start another Ford Versus Chevy revolver auto thing. I am sure someone keeps up with such things. Also, accidents. Are revolvers really safer? I think so, but I would really like facts to prove or disprove what I feel.

There are a lot of things that i like about the GLOCK 23 I bought to teach concealed carry classes with. It is indestructable. It has a finish that is virtually indestructable. There are accesories everywhere for it. The 40 Smith and wesson is not my first, choice for self defense, but you could do a whole lot worse. It has never jammed after over a thousand rounds. But I just don't like it. For me, the grip angle and size are all wrong. I can carry a longer barreled revolver easier in a pancake holster, which is the most concealable rig I know of. An as far as picking the thing up and shooting it, I can't hit a watermelon at twenty five yards. It's not the gun. the gun shoots as well as any other service type pistol, between three and four inches at twenty five yards. I just cant shoot it that well.

I have three different "K" frame Smith and Wessons. Each has a different barrel length or profile, and different grips. Each one shoots differently. My model 19 shoots very poorly in my hands, although it is very sound mechanicly. It has a set of Pachmeyer grips, And they don't work for me. My model 15 has Houge grips, and it shoots like a brain directed death ray. All I have to do is think, and it hits. My model 14 has bullseye grips, a barrel rib, and special sights. It is single action only, and it will cut the center out of any target That I have shot it at so far. I believe that rabbits sometimes die of fright if they hear me open the case it rests in. Each gun is different, but the same. When i put houges on the model 19, it becomes even more of what the 15 is, instant death to whatever I POINT it at.

I have Houge grips on my 629. It came that way, And heaven is heaven, why change it? I was a little concerned that someone might see me carrying at church,because the soft rubber that the houges are made from snagged on my coat, holding it up. It didn't look like I was carrying a gun, but it sure was obvious that there was something on my belt. So I got a set of beautiful burl walnut grips that were more combat type grips. My finger hit the trigger higher up, and I couldn't hit a pumpkin a 25 yards with one hand. Two handed double action was pretty dismal, too. I changed back after one day at the range. I wish I could do that with a GLOCK.

I got flamed constantly because i believe that If a cartridge won't put down medium game like deer and bear, then i wouldn't trust my life to it. I just can't get it out of my head that if a cartridge doesn't impress a deer, then it sure won't impress a crack head. If anything we need more power for two legged varmints. A deer will run off, a thug might shoot back, if he is able. One fellow in particular kept saying over and over that hunting was nothing like combat shooting. Poor defenseless herbivores don't act like thugs when they get shot. I feel the same way! A deer will run if it can. A thug might stand and fight if he can! Which one needs more power? I certainly don't have a lot of fear about deer being shot to pieces and still coming after me, but I have heard story after story about dopers that keep on coming, after taking hits. I just feel that it is better to put a hole big enough to see daylight thru in them. Preferably three or four holes that big.

I guess I just want some support for the choices that i have made reguarding a carry gun. I know that my reasoning is sound, but that doesn't mean that the next guy, who carries a Kel Tec, isn't just as right as me. Just not the best choice in my circumstances.

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pharmer
July 25, 2008, 10:35 PM
Nope. Joe

MCgunner
July 25, 2008, 10:40 PM
I get flamed on the internet for all sorts of stupid things. I'm used to it. Look at my post count. I've been around. Hell, I've even been flamed for having a high post count! :D

357wheelgunner
July 25, 2008, 10:46 PM
Carry what you shoot well.

A K-frame with a 4" barrel, loaded with 158gr LSWCHP+P .38 is, IMO, a fantastic carry gun and ammo combo. I can shoot it very well, so that's what I carry. In the winter, or in the woods, or on a road trip, I usually load up with 158gr Speer Gold Dot .357.

My 4" K-frames point like a finger, and feel great in an IWB or OWB holster. You can't beat that.

Tomorrow I'm shooting my new Sig P6, if all goes well I'll be packing that for a while to try a semi auto again.

People should carry what they shoot well. As long as it's .38 or 9mm or better, you can't do much else but practice.

W.E.G.
July 25, 2008, 10:50 PM
This guy just won't stop heckling me when I O/C my Model 10 in the old pancake holster.

I've got ammo older than he is.

Pay him no mind.

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/humor/MallNinja.jpg

gregormeister
July 25, 2008, 10:50 PM
Amen

VegasOPM
July 25, 2008, 10:57 PM
The anonymity granted by the internet forum environment leads a lot of people to speak out of turn and beyond their scope. In person, nobody has ever given me grief for my choice of carry. I think that the revolver is considered to be a bit more of an afficianados sidearm, as it is limited in ammo capacity. WIth my 642, I have only 5 rounds to take care of business- which means that aimed fire and familiarity with the weapon is critical. If cartridge effectiveness is critical, that is of obvious importance to you.

Just like no set of golf clubs is going to allow me to play like Tiger Woods. No sidearm is going to turn an unskilled or undisciplined shooter into a master.

Bushwhacker
July 25, 2008, 11:04 PM
Like some said before; Carry what you shoot best, and are comfortable with.


Whats the name of the forum your talking about?

send me a PM if you'd rather not say on a open forum.....

machinisttx
July 25, 2008, 11:10 PM
Yep, the wonderniners and their dependence upon high capacity often causes them to ridicule those who can actually hit something they want to past 3-7 yards, and those who "limit" themselves by carrying a 5 or 6 shot wheelgun(and actually knowing how to use it).

Stick to what you know and are familiar with---and pay those guys no attention.

NCBeagle
July 25, 2008, 11:51 PM
Hey docmagnum357, I am just another revolver guy in NC. I don't feel under-gunned with a J-Frame S&W 442 or Colt Detective Special / Cobra even on the "mean streets" of Charlotte. Sure, on some days I'll carry a 3" 1911, maybe the Glock 19 or Walther PPS...but usually it is some version of a .38 / .357 revolver with one or two speed strips. I am quite proficient with these guns...and I just like them.

Keep packing the wheel gun.

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b78/Prosecutor/DSCN0188.jpg
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b78/Prosecutor/T-Grip.jpg
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b78/Prosecutor/Mod60and36.jpg
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b78/Prosecutor/1975Cobras-2.jpg

The Bushmaster
July 25, 2008, 11:51 PM
Well golly gee...And I carry a mod 19 2 1/2" in the winter...I absolutely do not feel under gunned. Both of the house guns are Mod 10's...The only semi-auto I carry is in the summer...

Tom Servo
July 26, 2008, 12:13 AM
It seems that there is only one bright and shining path over there to bliss when it comes to a carry gun. And it is not an "N" frame smith. or even a k frame.
OK, stop right there. That's just crazy talk. ;)

A few years back, I realized that the S&W K-Frame was the perfect gun for me. It's got a marvelous balance, shoots as well as a Sig P220 (a high compliment), and it handles a load with the word "Magnum" in its name.

I've had plenty of people stare at it and go, "why do you carry a revolver? This is 2008!"

Their objections usually fall into the following categories:

It only holds six (or worse, 5) rounds
It's "heavy"
The trigger pull is too long, or
It's out-dated.


...to which my responses are:

I know several people who've survived gunfights. None of them fired more than two rounds (one was with a .32, the other with a .22 Magnum). Ergo, shot placement is everything.
A K-Frame is really not noticeably heavier than a fully loaded wondernine or steel 1911
A DA trigger is just as accurate with practice. In fact, I've learned to like having that much control. It's like driving a stick.
The design is over a century old, and it's still in service for a reason.


I've never had to worry about FTFs, stovepipes or finding ammo that "the gun likes." I have a wide variety of cheap ammunition to work with, and I can tailor my loads to fit whatever need may present itself.

Of course, if I don't have time to explain all that, I just say, "well, the boss doesn't trust me with a real gun. But, he says if I'm real good, he'll let me carry it with bullets in it someday." Then I pick my nose until they go away. :)

Plus, stainless steel holds up better in hot climates and requires much less maintenance, which is something to consider, since I shoot my carry gun several times a week, and I don't feel like cleaning it every time.

Yeah, I know it's not "tactical (whatever that means)" and that it's not on the cover of all the gun magazines, but it works for me.

armoredman
July 26, 2008, 12:21 AM
I don't often carry it, but it does ride as back up when I can wear a concealing garment. I have absolutely no doubt it is the most accurate revolver I have ever owned, and dead stone reliable.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b13/armoredman/outdated.jpg

45Guy
July 26, 2008, 12:34 AM
I'd carry my SP101 any day of the week if I could. Just because it isn't as "awesome":rolleyes: as a Glock 19 or some-such, doesn't mean it won't get the job done. And at the end of the day isn't that what it's all about?

Stainz
July 26, 2008, 12:40 AM
+1!

I usually feel safe with a 642, but - somedays - I have it's big brother, a 296 (5-shot hammerless .44 Special AirLite Ti.). This is my Sunday pocket carry - made possible by that Robert Mika's pocket holster:

http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u307/Stainz_2007/IMG_0596.jpg

Of course, my range-mates are always telling me I am not 'prepared' for the 'fecal matter impacting the air movement device' scenario. I need more 'capacity', they insist. They generally tell me about their 2-5 mags they have that they keep loaded. I finally had enough - ordered 100 moonclips from Ranch Products ($29 delivered then.). Here is my 625JM atop a .223 ammo can with five separated layers of 21 loaded moonclips - 105 total in that one, albeit heavy, ammo box. I have 34 more moonclips throughout the house - that's 834 rounds loaded. Top that with mags!

http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u307/Stainz_2007/IMG_0585.jpg

Stainz

jad0110
July 26, 2008, 12:42 AM
Just like no set of golf clubs is going to allow me to play like Tiger Woods. No sidearm is going to turn an unskilled or undisciplined shooter into a master.

Nicely said. Carry what you shoot best, and make sure it is reliable.

Other than on the Internet, I can't recall ever taking crap from anyone about carrying a revolver. Probably because I was armed at the time :p .

markk
July 26, 2008, 12:52 AM
Try starting a thread about carrying a Ladysmith and listen to the ridiculous comments challenging your masculinity because your revolver has the word "Lady" on it...

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2252/2431142885_3c84528080.jpg?v=0

Pat Cannon
July 26, 2008, 12:52 AM
You spelled Hogue wrong. Other than that, you are right and they are wrong.

I carry an SP101, and shoot it in IDPA Backup Gun matches with whatever practice ammo I find that somewhat approaches the power level of my carry ammo. Since a lot of guys shoot 9mm or .380 or .32 ACP in BUG matches, I often hear people behind me say things like, "Holy crap!!!" in a tone such that I interpret their meaning to be, "That is freakin' awesome."

freakshow10mm
July 26, 2008, 12:59 AM
If you go through life trying to impress and please other people, you are going to lead a sorry life.

greener
July 26, 2008, 01:02 AM
I don't stay up late at night worrying about being flamed for my choices. When the mood strikes me I carry a 1911, P90, GP100 or an M&P9. Lately, I've been carrying a 442. Somehow, I can't see strapping into the M&P9 with a box of ammo in mags on the belt to go to the grocery store when I can stick the Airweight into my pocket.

FerFAL
July 26, 2008, 01:03 AM
I dont get it why some people packing revolvers feel the need to ridicule those that carry autos.

Carry whatever you want. But is it necessary to flame those that carry autos?

I carry an auto as a main gun an a snubby for backup.
Why auto as primary? For the same reason every army, and pretty much every police department and law enforcement agency and security detail use them.

Heck, packing an auto doesnít mean you canít shoot, where does that come from?

Iím not an instructor, but Iíve taught many people how to shoot, boys and girls alike. They ALL shoot better with autos, specially Glocks.:neener:

FerFAL

Tom Servo
July 26, 2008, 02:35 AM
Just because it isn't as "awesome" as a Glock 19 or some-such, doesn't mean it won't get the job done.
Oh, yeah it is...

http://lonelymachines.org/images/posters/696_poster.jpg

Heck, packing an auto doesnít mean you canít shoot, where does that come from? Iím not an instructor, but Iíve taught many people how to shoot, boys and girls alike. They ALL shoot better with autos, specially Glocks
Nobody's saying that you can't shoot well with an auto. I know lots of folks who do. The OP was concerned with negative attitudes towards revolvers.

That said, an automatic can be "easier" to shoot well with than a revolver in double-action. Lighter trigger and all. I've got nothing against them; autos make up more than half my pistols.

But for me, the revolver is a worthy and rewarding option. FWIW, everyone I've taught on a revolver has been a better shooter for it. The revolver takes patience and concentration to do well, and it's not forgiving of shooter error to the extent that some automatics are.

Drilling with a good wheelgun will teach proper sight alignment and trigger control, and even if the shooter chooses not to use one in the long run (which is less often than you'd think :)), they'll be darn good shots.

loneviking
July 26, 2008, 02:46 AM
This thread reminds me of something funny that happened at my CCW class. We're on the firing line and there's lots of little 'pops' going off from the little .380's and 9 mm's. Down on the other side of the range a guy unlimbers a Thompson Contender. I don't know what caliber that Thompson was, but it would 'boooom', and then you would hear 'pop,pop,pop'. One of the girls sitting next to me, a newbie to guns, looked over at me--pointed to the Thompson and said 'Now that's a real gun'! :D

What strikes me as funny is when somebody with an autoloader makes fun of somebody with a revolver---and then sets up and shoots at targets some 30 feet away! That's point blank range with my Colt .357! At the distance I often shoot at, they tell me I should just use a rifle, that a handgun wasn't designed for that.

Nope, I've had to shoot animals that wanted to hurt me, and I want something absolutely reliable, deadly accurate and that makes really big holes!

Srigs
July 26, 2008, 02:55 AM
I have been carrying my Model 66-1 2.5" more and more as primary and love it. I still like my M&P40c but the 66 just feels right in my hand.

If people don't like it they can pound sand. :evil:

rondog
July 26, 2008, 03:10 AM
I used to have two identical S&W Model 19's, 6" blued. I really miss them. Bought each for $225, and sold 'em for around $200 each. Those days are long gone. When I sold the second one, there was another guy had it in his hands before I got out the door.

def4pos8
July 26, 2008, 08:10 AM
I HATE having to bend down and pick up brass!;)

I once shot my P7/PSP, P-9S (.45), CZ-75 (no suffix) and P89 often. I still have 'em and enjoy 'em on occasion. I carry Smiths -- J-, K-, L- or N-frame as the day demands. --and don't shag brass any more.:D

docmagnum357
July 26, 2008, 10:40 AM
Thanks guys.
All I really want to say in reply is that I hope no one thought I was flaming autoloaders. I have a Browning Buckmark target, And I love it. I will tell you a dirty little secret about that gun. If I had a good holster for it, I would probably feel better armed with it in a real, actual gunfight, than I would with my GLOCK 23. I can hit with that gun. That's not to say that I wish I could undo the trade I made to get the Browning, A 617 Smith and Wesson.

The CZ75 and the SIG p220 both work very well for me, just not as good as a revolver of comparable power. I will say again that I love everything about GLOCKS except that they won't shoot well for me. The problem is my hands, eyes, ingrained muscle memory, whatever.

CajunBass
July 26, 2008, 11:43 AM
I don't carry a revolver. That may change, I've got a Model 19 on layaway but I would no more worry about what someone else thought of my choice of carry gun as I would about my choice of lawnmower. :rolleyes: Who cares what someone else thinks?

strangelittleman
July 26, 2008, 12:16 PM
Yep, a S&W M65 4" for me. When I do carry an auto, it's a Walther P5.

Matt-J2
July 26, 2008, 12:52 PM
I cry myself to sleep every night with the thought that my lawnmower is inadequate in the eyes of my neighbors.
Course, I don't have a lawnmower. Or a lawn. :p



No, I don't get flamed for carrying a revolver. Mostly, because I don't actually carry one. Mostly, because I don't have one that I could conceal well. Mostly(again), because concealing said revolver that I don't own could get me arrested, never mind flamed.

jad0110
July 26, 2008, 05:58 PM
Tom,

That is a sweet 696 (I assume)! What are the stocks you've got on it, they look fantastic!

Meeteetse
July 26, 2008, 06:49 PM
Thought this was a good place to make my first post on this forum.

I've been shooting for over 50 years and have heard all the comments; . . ."why are you using that old thing or that caliber or whatever?". .

It started when I was using a 30/06 when everyone else was using a 7mm atomic, or when I continued to use a 1911 when others had switched to plastic guns.

The same is true when I got my first CCW permit nearly 20 years ago. I decided that if I was going to carry a gun, all day, everyday, it was going to be something I wouldn't leave at home. My first choice was a S&W Mdl. 36 snubby, and except for the fact that I now carry an airweight 442, nothing much has changed. Others ask why I carry a gun of only 5 shots when I could have one that holds 10, 12 or 15. My answer has always been the same. Because I have confidence in it and I can hit what I shoot at. There is no better reason to carry anything different.

I do admit that on rare occasions I have carried a Glock 36, but rarely. The 442, with a couple of speed strips, is my companion. It can get me out of trouble.

Stainz
July 26, 2008, 08:52 PM
My first CCL was for my G21 - which I had for a few years until I sold it ten years ago the first of next month. I never carried it, of course... it was definitely an OWB holster type. Love my pocketable 642 & 296... I carry them, and that's the key.

Stainz

dubious
July 26, 2008, 09:50 PM
I think revolvers are sexier than Semi Autos, and that most of the Pro's and Con's of each balance out. Except for one thing.

That one thing is the DA trigger pulls. They are ridiculously heavy.... I can't say I've really worked hard at getting good with DA. Anyway you slice it though, a heavy trigger is an awful thing. If I was in a self defense situation I think I'd use SA.

crebralfix
July 26, 2008, 10:16 PM
docmagnum357,

Carry a gun...doesn't matter what! Carry it!

Imagine a time when the DA revolver was new as a commercial product. Ed McGivern was flamed for advocating the DOUBLE ACTION revolver. Apparently, he didn't like that, so he set out to PROVE the DA was better...and he did. He applied science to the problem, took many measurements, and did a road show. People got the hint, even if some gun writers never did.

***

But, also remember that fighting is more than just guns. I think that is the deal on the other forum...the skills for someone preparing for a fight are different than those typically taught on the range.

So...what does that mean? Knives, fists, and fitness. Get some skill in all of them (and fitness is a skill because one has to learn the movements).

Proper training techniques and regimens will be argued until the end of time. My philosophy is: "If someone is getting flamed for a particular technique, then it's time to go learn it." I have found that the gun world is rife with "religion" and talking about anything contrary to doctrine means a call to The Gun World Inquisition.

When people talk about:

Apparently, they believe in shooting without aiming, and running around shooting at people while they are running from them and trying to get away from them or trying to attack someone else or something.

...they're really talking about maximizing their chances of survival. The shooting without aiming thing is just a means of getting a fast shot off while keeping the chance of hitting as close to 100% as possible. That means different things to different people...three feet for one person, thirty for another. We certainly don't walk around in body armor, so movement is the primary defense.

It has been demonstrated why movement is a great defense: it causes them to miss! This is fact; there is no disputing it. It's certainly easy to test; just get an Airsoft gun and try it in various ways. Lenny Magill has several demos on his Concealed Carry video, but you can also search around the 'net and find some sources.

What's really interesting is that we can turn to history and find many examples of point shooting and shooting while moving. Look at McGivern's Fast and Fancy Revolver Shooting for hip and drive-by shooting instructions (as well as ads for weapon mounted lights). Check out Fairbairn and Sykes Shooting to Live for detailed information on point shooting and their success with the Shanghai PD--the number of killed and wounded felons says it all. Additionally, Jim Cirillo's material is excellent. Guns, Bullets and Gunfights is a must-have; his DVDs are good.

And, guess what? Mr. Cirillo would have taken a 44 Magnum "Smith and Dan" into his fights (S&W 29 frame with a Dan Wesson barrel) over his issue 38 revolvers. Remember, he killed 17 men and wounded many others in the late 60's and through the 70's in the NYC Stakeout Squad. After retiring, he taught self-defense classes that included point shooting and movement. The man knew what he was talking about.

That said, Cirillo's partner used a 1911. Both men had good results.

So, yeah, your choice of a large bore revolver goes against the grain. But...you're carrying a gun! All that remains is to expand your skill set a bit...not to "ninja" level...but at least be able to fend off a knife and do a nut punch for 45 seconds. It's up to you to determine what the minimum level of skill is appropriate for you.

And, statistics are just math. They may not describe YOUR fight, though your fight will be included in them one year later. Three shots...I hope all our fights end with ZERO shots fired. But, be prepared for the problem that may occur...one more bad guy, from a different direction, with a different weapon. There may be only one needing shooting three times, but you won't know until you're in the situation.

That's what those die-hards on the other forum are talking about. Unfortunately, they can get a bit zealous if they think their "religion" is being challenged.

***

I cannot decide if a revolver is "sexier" than an autopistol. I tend to reserve such judgements for women.

***

People look at me funny when I show up with a $600 hunting rifle and "average" glass to shoot at 1,000 yards. They seem to think that purchasing a $4,000 rifle, $3,000 scope, and $1,000 worth of gear is a requirement. I guess they've bought into all those ads they read in the gun rags and on TV.

***

The neatest revolver EVER made, despite "the lock", is the new Lew Horton S&W Model 27 with 3.5" barrel. Square butt, ball detent, Performance Center trigger job, checked top, grooved front and back straps, neat "retro" lug, chamfered cylinders, adjustable sights...and EIGHT rounds of 357 Magnum goodness! The old 27's are neat, but eight is better than six!

rdrancher
July 26, 2008, 10:19 PM
I wouldn't worry about any dipstick talking smack about me carrying a revolver - on a forum or anywhere else. I've had a revolver pointed at me at close range, and I'll tell ya, It was plenty adequate!

Carry what you want - practice with it a ton - and tell the naysayers to shove it where the sun don't shine if they don't like it.

rd

tinygnat219
July 27, 2008, 12:02 AM
Meh.

The only way I would worry about getting flamed is having too much muzzle blast.

Wouldn't worry about it. If you REALLY want to have some fun though, start talking about how stone cold reliable that model 1873 SAA is. :evil:

You have to have some fun with people who really don't get it it sometimes.

FerFAL
July 27, 2008, 02:14 AM
And, guess what? Mr. Cirillo would have taken a 44 Magnum "Smith and Dan" into his fights (S&W 29 frame with a Dan Wesson barrel) over his issue 38 revolvers. Remember, he killed 17 men and wounded many others in the late 60's and through the 70's in the NYC Stakeout Squad. After retiring, he taught self-defense classes that included point shooting and movement. The man knew what he was talking about.

Crebralfix,
Hate doing this to you but,

Cirillo was a big Glock fan and carried a compact Glock, either G27 in .40 S&W or the G30 in .45 ACP.
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BQY/is_3_54/ai_n24232224
He packed revolvers when Glocks didnít exist. ;)

FerFAL

Sam
July 27, 2008, 03:26 AM
Flame me for carrying a revo?
Mke me laugh some more.

Only one person that ever made a disparaging comment about em to me in person........

Sam
July 27, 2008, 03:37 AM
duplicate

ArchAngelCD
July 27, 2008, 03:58 AM
I carry a revolver every day and I don't feel under-gunned with a J frame. You won't get an argument from me for carrying a revolver, any revolver.

It's my opinion many of those who shoot a semi-auto and consider a snub nose revolver only a last ditch backup gun or a belly gun aren't willing to put in the practice time to become proficient with a short revolver. Like said above, carry what you shoot well. I agree shot placement is critical to surviving an attack.

Here's a scan of a target I shot with a M638 loaded with Federal Nyclad .38 Special rounds from 30 feet out.

http://i116.photobucket.com/albums/o26/ArchAngelCD/Jframetarget10.jpg

Hey, any handgun will do a good job if you do your job, even a .32 Auto. (remember, shot placement) If you practice enough you can shoot any gun well. Here is a scan of a target shot with a Kel-Tec P-32 and 73gr Fiocchi Ball ammo.

http://i116.photobucket.com/albums/o26/ArchAngelCD/keltec_target1.jpg

Carry what you shoot well and carry the handgun you have confidence in! Don't let the little kids on the Internet get to you. They are very brave from behind the safety of their computer screen. Don't worry about people like that. Trust yourself!!

waverace
July 27, 2008, 04:16 AM
I personaly dont like the look or feel of revolvers , but they do shoot good and 357 or 44 has to be more effective than 9mm , read a book once that most gunfights happen at distances inside 5 feet and last less than a few seconds , this was from a policeman with the shanghai police who had to deal with a lot of bad guys .
I would say as others have , use what you feel comfortable with and most importantly use what is going to get you out of the situation alive .

glocksrfugly
July 27, 2008, 04:16 AM
Double action revolvers have been successfully defending military, law enforcement, security personel, and civilians for around 120 years now. someone shot in a vital area with a .38 special in the year 2008 is just as dead as someone who got shot with a .38 special in 1905!
You know the old saying " If it ain't broke don't fix it".
I find it funny how you go into a gun shop and see all these semi autos sold to guys with all the reasons like "its high capacity" or " a forty-five auto, serious knock down power" or "all the cops around her use a Sig in .40 caliber S&W".
But, let a woman walk into that same gun shop and say "The streets are getting bad nowdays, I don't know much about guns but I would like something to defend myself against these creeps". What does the salesman probably pull out of the case?....Yes, A five shot Smith or Taurus J frame! "Here ya go sweetheart' just point it at the B_st_rd and pull the trigger" Kind of ironic isn't it.
Does that mean we have given our Wives and Daughters, our loved ones, the "weaker sex" inferior protection? It's the same creeps and scum out there we are defending against as the ones our ladies are right?
No, it's just that the revolver is a proven tool. just aim and pull the trigger.
I think that Americans can really get caught up in all that "more is better" or "newer is better" ways of thinking.

florida1098
July 27, 2008, 07:51 AM
I've had a moedel 10 Smith issued to me by NYPD in 1983. My wife, a few years later was issued a model 64. They are still in our posession as we are now LEO's elsewhere. When we left NYPD my wife and I were only 2 of about about 3000 of the cops still authorized to carry a revolver with the switch to semi's. This was about 2004. I always believed a revolver was sufficient. But, now I would never leave the house w/o a Glock. Times have changed, bad guys are more savage and rarely alone. There is just no reason for myself or my wife to have limited rounds. I know some will say speedloaders, or strips, but truthfully carrying them is awkward and heavy. I simply refuse to enter harms way with a limited round revolver. Also, that arguement a revolver will go bang everytime is foolish. Just look at all the posts asking "what is wrong with my revolver"? Lock-up, timing issues, main springs, don't ever tell me revolvers don't break. And when they do fail, nothing short of a workbench and handtools can make them operable. To each their own, but if you can shoot and carry either why not take the most rounds available, and in my opinion (Glock) the most reliable.

crebralfix
July 27, 2008, 08:28 AM
Crebralfix,
Hate doing this to you but,

Cirillo was a big Glock fan and carried a compact Glock, either G27 in .40 S&W or the G30 in .45 ACP.
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...4/ai_n24232224
He packed revolvers when Glocks didnít exist.


FerFAL,

I'm not sure I understand your post.

(See previous post) Cirillo mentioned in both his book and his DVDs that he had 38 caliber revolvers when he was in the NYC PD. He spent a bit of time talking about "hacking" the S&W and DW revolvers together and made the comment that he would have taken that to his fights at that time.

After the 10mm cartridge came out, he switched to that. I think it was because the Federal agency he was working for was issued Glocks. I do know that he used a Glock in his DVDs.

crebralfix
July 27, 2008, 08:30 AM
I think that Americans can really get caught up in all that "more is better" or "newer is better" ways of thinking.

So true...which means you need an AK pistol in 7.62x39mm with a 75 round drum!

Lt. G
July 27, 2008, 09:09 AM
Brothers and Sisters,

Carry whatever weapon you want. Be it wheel gun, semi auto pistol, a small howitzer, hand held nuke, (lol), just if you live in a one of our great states that permits , just carry and be happy. Lt. G

skoro
July 27, 2008, 11:58 AM
Nope.

But if I ever was, I'd just totally disregard the dummy. There's no cure for stupid. And trying to have a "conversation" with a fool is impossible. You just have to let them go on their foolish way, making stupid impressions on everyone else but the other fools, who wil be in lockstep agreement wih fool #1. :D

Guns and more
July 27, 2008, 12:06 PM
Why would anyone care what I carry? Simply personal choice. And that works two ways. Flamed? It's the internet, what do you expect?

FerFAL
July 27, 2008, 05:53 PM
Good post florida1098, I feel the same way.;)

You know the old saying " If it ain't broke don't fix it".
I find it funny how you go into a gun shop and see all these semi autos sold to guys with all the reasons like "its high capacity" or " a forty-five auto, serious knock down power" or "all the cops around her use a Sig in .40 caliber S&W".
But, let a woman walk into that same gun shop and say "The streets are getting bad nowdays, I don't know much about guns but I would like something to defend myself against these creeps". What does the salesman probably pull out of the case?....Yes, A five shot Smith or Taurus J frame! "Here ya go sweetheart' just point it at the B_st_rd and pull the trigger" Kind of ironic isn't it.
Does that mean we have given our Wives and Daughters, our loved ones, the "weaker sex" inferior protection?

It’s got nothing to with sex and everything to do with complexity of each handgun platform.
Autos offer more, but they are also more complex to operate. Not much but still more things to mess up or forget about than in a revolver.
For a person with limited gun knowledge like my wife, or someone that hasn’t fired in years like my brother, I generally hand them a nice 38 S&W or Colt.

Crebralfix, sorry my mistake.

FerFAL

Brasso
July 27, 2008, 08:05 PM
Are you sure that website wasn't a bunch of dipsticks who think that Counterstrike is somehow relevant to real life?

pinkymingeo
July 27, 2008, 08:06 PM
A lot of guys seem to have played one too many video games, or at least watched one too many action movies. Get real. I usually carry a 5-shot J-frame without a reload, and don't feel undergunned. No, I don't intend to get into a running gunfight with terrorists, bank robbers or international gem thieves. Or shoot it out with a nest of foreign agents, or a clutch of space aliens. I probably won't get the hot starlet in the end, but that's OK. There's a remote chance I might have to protect myself from a mugger or vicious dog. The J-frame will work for that. Space aliens? Is there a waiting period for ray guns?

tblt
July 27, 2008, 08:34 PM
I like a revolver because if you have a bad round just pull the trigger again

Elvishead
July 28, 2008, 10:36 AM
NO!!!!

Pat Cannon
July 28, 2008, 12:31 PM
I do carry a reload with my 5-shooter, on the assumption that if I have to shoot, it will take me longer to assess the status of threat than it will to shoot him 4 more times. In other words, it seems likely to me that I'll be emptying the gun before I decide how many rounds are necessary. Then I might want to reload.

RugerSAFan
July 28, 2008, 12:43 PM
Of all my sidearms, my favorite are the revolvers.
The Keltec may be comfortable for summer attire, but I don't enjoy shooting it.

I purchased a Colt 1911 70 series because I bought into the mantra that I was supposed to have one. I don't plan on selling it, but I'm not real comfortable carrying it. I just don't trust the reliability (yet).

The two Glocks are VERY reliable, but they just don't do anything for me.

The Taurus 85 is nice and light but my FAVORITE is the Model 60 Lady Smith. Every time I shoot that sucker I smile. Don't mind if it says Lady on it. I've fathered enough children to be okay with my man-hood.

Two additional thoughts -
1> With a revolver, I tend to shoot fewer shots than with an auto, which keeps costs reasonable.
2> If SHTF in a serious way, and I had to grab my "go bag" and head "out" (more likely when living in the D.C. area), I would likely grab one of the glocks (due to reliability) and the Ruger .45lc (due to comfort with) and a whole bunch of ammo.

Good discussion....

jaholder1971
July 28, 2008, 02:06 PM
Gun shops stock what sells and every one I go to has a snubby revolvers well represented in the case alongside the semiautos and handcannons.

They're there because people are buying them and using them. 'Nuff said.

Why would you carry a hunting cartridge for CCW anyway? I'd think the meat would be stringy and laced with crack or heroin. would you have him shoulder mounted for the wall or a full size mount placed right in the middle of the living room?

Rugerlvr
July 28, 2008, 02:46 PM
I'm a revolver guy. I'm waiting on my permit, but when I do start to carry, I'm carrying my new no-lock 642, and I won't feel bad about it.

Strangely, the only auto-pistol I have any desire to own is a 1911, and I have one. I don't even look at autos in the shops these days.

Moonclip
July 29, 2008, 07:09 AM
Yes, I used to open carry a S&W N frame in .45acp in a high robbery risk retail enviroment. I had a backup revolver or two on me and a shotgun and/or a long gun close by as well as well as usually another armed employee.

I had a mall ninja type customer redicule my choice of weapon one time.

I could load the N frame fairly quickly so it's lower capacity plus the other factors I mentioned caused me to not worry about it.

I was in my mid 20's at the time so I think people found it strange in the time period I carried that revolver.

crebralfix
July 29, 2008, 09:08 AM
No worries, FerFAL...this is a fun discussion!

Lots of great posts.

Besides the new S&W M27 Lew Horton 8x357 is the BEST!!! Though, I do like that 3" GP100...and my S&W 625...and....

CSA 357
July 30, 2008, 09:41 PM
Nope Never! Im A Wheel Gun Man, I Do Carry A Colt 1911 Some Times

wheelgunslinger
July 30, 2008, 09:51 PM
I have taken some grief over carrying a wheelgun by either high speed operators who go to taco bell all geared up in cordura or by newbs who think that telling me what I should buy and use they will validate their choices.

One guy actually said to me "why don't you buy a sigma like I have?"

:rolleyes:

Tom Servo
July 30, 2008, 11:17 PM
Are you sure that website wasn't a bunch of dipsticks who think that Counterstrike is somehow relevant to real life?
Wait...you mean CounterStrike isn't real life? :)

I was doing inventory on the collection a few days back, and I realized that I've traded automatics for revolvers, but never the inverse. I wonder if I'm on a roll here...

MadOgre has a nice article on revolvers here (http://www.madogre.com/interviews/revolvers.htm).

Rugerlvr
July 30, 2008, 11:22 PM
http://www.xmission.com/~jdjonsson/images/jframes.jpg
http://www.xmission.com/~jdjonsson/images/m28-2tough.jpg

usmcpmi
July 30, 2008, 11:43 PM
IMO, The most imporntant thing is what YOU are most comfortable with.If you can shoot a revolver, and it feels good to you, then do it. I have both revolvers and autos. From .22 up to my Grizzley in .45 Win Mag. My carry weapon is a series 70 1911. I can hit pretty much anything I can see...That comes from thousands of rounds down range. I don't care what you carry, just as long as you carry something. Never know, your actions at the right time might save the life of someone I care about. Bad people are all around, just waiting for a chance to prey on the weak.....MG

Drgong
July 30, 2008, 11:51 PM
Another North Carolinian here, and have to say that if I was to carry something, it would be a revolver, as if in the heat of action something went wrong, you just pull the trigger again to shoot.

Poor East Texan
July 30, 2008, 11:57 PM
Hmm, when you get right down to it my Dads S&W 36 will pretty much hide in my front jeans pocket while his KT P3AT prints "gun".

Several years ago I did NOT like shooting that 36. Major muzzle jump! I can just imagine touching off magnums in such a gun!

All this does NOT keep me from wanting a nice .357/.38 with a 3-5" barrel....

Kevin3824
July 31, 2008, 05:22 AM
There is something to be said for a high powered snub nose like a .357 Magnum. When I go to the public range here I have literally seen people pack up and leave after hearing how loud my S&W 649 is. Several have changed their minds when they see the groups I put up with this weapon. I was even surprised when I saw the blue flame that comes from the barrel when it is fired.

What it boils down to is I like my gun and use it well. It makes me feel good and safe despite what others may think or say.

I also own a competition Glock which I am not nearly as impressed with and cannot carry as often due to its size and the fragility of the night sites on it.

I guess those flamers just want to be anal retentive and closed minded to revolvers in general which is foolish IMO

plexreticle
July 31, 2008, 08:12 AM
People that dog out other peoples equipment usually have more equipment then skill.

K frame Smith is hard to beat as a around handgun for defense or hunting.

Virginian
July 31, 2008, 10:20 AM
I have owned over 40 semi autos, and I tried, but I just cannot really like them. Honestly, I did try. I even still have a Ruger Mark II 22. But, I still like my Single Six better. And, in a centerfire gun I will take a revolver every time.
It may be a generational thing, too. I grew up watching Roy, Clint, and the Duke wield a six gun, for the last generation and this one it's all semis.

wjh2657
July 31, 2008, 10:44 AM
Love my Glock 23 and my BERSA Thunder. Carried a 1911 for thirty years in USMC. Truth is that I am getting older and crave simplicity and reliability. Over the years I have owned numerous bottom feeders and loved them But even the most expensive and modified have failed me at one time or another, always on the range and not in the field. It is just in the nature of the beast. For those who will scream that they have fired 30,000+ rounds in theirs and it has never failed, they were shooting at a different range than me. I have seen many FTF and FTE among my colleagues, and with professionally reworked guns. I will be EDC as soon as my TN HCP gets to me in the mail and Ihave developed a "Warriors philosophy", as to what that means, I will draw only when there is no other out (run away, hide, etc. ) I have elected this policy because i have served on too many juries (I am 65 years old) and seen how the house, pension plan and kids' college plan is given away by juries to the families of scum bags shot by honest people defending themselves.

In short my piece is going to be like a Samuraii's sword, if it is drawn somebody gets cut/shot. Keeping that in mind I will only clear leather if I mean to shoot and I will not hesitate to shoot once I clear leather. Do the mental work while your hands are still empty. (Make the decision before drawing.) To rebut those who say you don't have the time to think, I say drawing a gun on impulse means you probably are in a situation where the gun isn't the answer or you forgot to stay in Condition yellow and are trying to wing it. Bad idea with a piece!

With that philosophy in place, I need a gun that I know is going to go bang, for sure! Just can't beat a S&W wheelgun for that!

weisse52
July 31, 2008, 02:06 PM
People buy what they see being "sold" in gun mags. They buy what they see the Police carry. They buy what the "guy" at the gun store said too.

No one should every flame anyone for what they carry. If you want to talk about flames, see what happens when you tell them you carry a NAA 22 mag 24/7!

I love 1911's and carry them alot. But I love revolvers and will always have one to carry.

Side note, I just read an article in one of my mags from last year where they ask the "experts" what they carry. All manner of firearms where discussed, but in just about each case they mentioned that they always some type of J frame with them. Makes you wonder what they carry 24/7 in real life???

Evyl Robot
July 31, 2008, 02:20 PM
It may be a generational thing, too. I grew up watching Roy, Clint, and the Duke wield a six gun, for the last generation and this one it's all semis.

Nah, I don't think so. I'm only 29, but you don't see me with a bunch of Romeo + Juliet looking custom pistols. I keep meaning to get me a bottom-feeder, but I always put it off until after that next revolver. They're just so pretty and full of character!

--Michael

bleachcola
July 31, 2008, 09:52 PM
Statistically, there a less than three shots exchanged in a gunfight. I dare not bring that up over there, but it is a fact. Statistics on where someone was hit, and how fast they went down are not available to civillians like us, but if they were, I am sure they would bear out that accuracy, particularly with the first shot or two, generally carries the day.

Statistically, a person will never be in a gunfight in their entire life. Doesn't mean you should play those stats and leave your gun at home. But if you do want to talk stats I have to point out that even trained professionals like police officers land less than half of the bullets shot on target. Even for them a 5 shot revolver is just good enough to handle one person. So what happens if you have to shoot more than one person? But you are right in when mentioning accuracy. Training is the most important thing an armed citizen can have. The firearm itself is secondary, so long as it is dependable. That being said, I'd advise anyone to carry whatever they are comfortable with and can depend on.

jaholder1971
August 1, 2008, 12:57 AM
I've currently have sitting next to me a proverbial "Old School" defensive combination: A Smith and Wesson Model 59 loaded with Federal 80's vintage 9BP 115 grain JHP's.

In my nightstand is a Ruger .357 Security Six loaded with Remington 125 grain JHP's.

Quick, someone drag me into the 21st century!

[/sarcasm]

greener
August 1, 2008, 01:20 AM
've currently have sitting next to me a proverbial "Old School" defensive combination: A Smith and Wesson Model 59 loaded with Federal 80's vintage 9BP 115 grain JHP's.

In my nightstand is a Ruger .357 Security Six loaded with Remington 125 grain JHP's.

Quick, someone drag me into the 21st century!

[/sarcasm]

I'm pretty satisfied with the 20th century: 442 w/lrn; GP100 w/jhp, 1911 with 230gr.

vanilla_gorilla
August 1, 2008, 02:39 AM
Originally posted by bleachcola:
Statistically, a person will never be in a gunfight in their entire life. Doesn't mean you should play those stats and leave your gun at home. But if you do want to talk stats I have to point out that even trained professionals like police officers land less than half of the bullets shot on target. Even for them a 5 shot revolver is just good enough to handle one person. So what happens if you have to shoot more than one person? But you are right in when mentioning accuracy. Training is the most important thing an armed citizen can have. The firearm itself is secondary, so long as it is dependable. That being said, I'd advise anyone to carry whatever they are comfortable with and can depend on.

Now don't go throwing facts into a good nostalgia-fest. I'd really like to see somebody cite some somewhat-current facts for that old "three shots" rule. IIRC, those facts where from some thirty to forty years ago.

Now, I've been known to occasionally carry my Model 27 or Model 28 when I'm out and about, and I feel well-protected. I also tote at least 2 reloads with it, however. I won't venture out without at least 15 rounds for whatever I happen to be toting. Assuming you'll get hits every time you pull the trigger is stupid. Assuming you'll get good hits every time is even worse. I won't even delve further into my thoughts about multiple assailants and those people who don't surf the internet gun sites and don't know that they're supposed to go down with one shot.

Defensory
August 1, 2008, 03:38 AM
Posted by machinisttx:
Yep, the wonderniners and their dependence upon high capacity often causes them to ridicule those who can actually hit something they want to past 3-7 yards, and those who "limit" themselves by carrying a 5 or 6 shot wheelgun (and actually knowing how to use it). Stick to what you know and are familiar with---and pay those guys no attention.

"The second policeman emptied his revolver at Bill without ever hitting him. In return, he nearly severed the lawman's leg with one shot, then walked over and shot him in the head as he tried frantically to reload."

http://ajas29.tripod.com/massbio.html

Gee, somebody forgot to inform the murdered police officer that:

1. WonderWheelie (WW) shooters aren't supposed to miss that many times. After all, they only have six rounds, so they're supposed to "make them count". :rolleyes:

2. Since the "average" shooting incident only requires 2.5 rounds, he was clearly above his "quota" after firing and missing with all six rounds. :scrutiny:

3. WW shooters aren't supposed to miss that many times, because WW's are "more accurate" than semi-autos. :rolleyes:

4. WW shooters are just not supposed to get killed while reloading. That just makes it too obvious that the high cap semi-auto crowd knows what they're talking about. ;)

mavracer
August 1, 2008, 07:11 AM
"The second policeman emptied his revolver at Bill without ever hitting him. In return, he nearly severed the lawman's leg with one shot, then walked over and shot him in the head as he tried frantically to reload."
A: he was out gunned hi powered rifle vs. handgun.

B: what makes you think he would have survived with a hi cap handgun.

pinkymingeo
August 1, 2008, 07:29 AM
Handguns aren't very good for personal defense, just better than nothing. They stink for combat. If you're going into a combat situation, I highly recommend a long gun. I also recommend that you don't engage in combat with a rifle-toting guy when all you have is a handgun. It's like bringing a knife to a gunfight. On the other hand you can carry a high-cap auto, plenty of extra mags, maybe some brass knuckles or a sap, a large knife, dress in fatigues and walk through town if you like. Have fun.

Defensory
August 1, 2008, 07:36 AM
A: he was out gunned hi powered rifle vs. handgun.

No, it wasn't a "hi powered rifle". It was a military style semi-auto.

B: what makes you think he would have survived with a hi cap handgun.

The killer walked over to the officer as he attempted to reload his revolver, and shot him at near-point blank range.

Common sense tells me that if the officer would've had a high capacity 9mm with 16 rounds, the perpetrator wouldn't have been able to simply walk over and shoot him, because the officer would've still had ten rounds left.

In a shootout with a heavily armed and deranged individual, sixteen rounds beats six, 24-7-365. It's just plain common sense.

greener
August 1, 2008, 08:13 AM
No backup gun? No speed loader for the revolver? No other fire power in the officer's car? A gun fight against a bad guy with a rifle who was close enough to casually walk over and shoot him and the officer wasn't reacting to that? Seems like a bunch of questions hanging out there.

Yep, 16 is better than 6, but....

Most of the LEO's I know carry more than one. My son has his service gun (glock) and an Airweight as a BUG. His patrol car has a shotgun and an M16.

What an LEO may elect to carry and what I elect to carry are based on very different potential use assumptions.

florida1098
August 1, 2008, 08:55 AM
The scenario involved an Officer (NYPD) serving a warrant in a basement in NYC with his female partner. There are many accounts as to the level of uselessness she provided but, the fact was the Officer did engage a perp in a gunfight and ran out of Ammo in his revolver. While reloading, the perp did walk right up on him and proceed to shoot at point blank range. I don't know if he would be alive today if he had not had to reload or had 9 more rounds available, loaded, to gain control of the perp. I do know at the time I had a Model 10 issue from NYPD, and began to seriously feel outgunned simply due to capacity. I will carry nothing else these days except a Glock, on or off duty. I still have revolvers in my nightstand and draw, but when I am out on, or off duty, in my opinion this is the time an encounter is most likely to occur, I want the lightest, highest capacity, and most importantly, reliable tool for defense. If I pulled the trigger on my Glock, I am betting my life it shoots. Now, in 24 yrs as an LEO the only single round that did not go off after I pulled the trigger was on a NYPD service issue Ruger revolver. I don't know or remember why it happened, but that gun was gone the next day. When we went to the range with revolvers we needed to combat reload an empty revolver with either speed strips or speedloaders in a 3 second window. The range Officers would attempt to put pressure on us as might well be the case in a reload scenario. I don't think alot of people know how hard it is to reload with a speedloader, trying to find the hole sequence, all the while keeping your eyes on the approaching perp with intent and possibly shooting at you. Standing at the range window, aiming slowly and shooting single action, or even double, is a lot different than a rapid fire under pressure, save your life scenario. I love revolvers, the same way I love old cars and bicycles, but my opinion, a semi is in everyway superior to a revolver, except maybe when it comes to striking someone physically,(not joking) to subdue them. To all, be safe and I hope we never have to prove ant of these thoughts.

mavracer
August 1, 2008, 09:15 AM
No, it wasn't a "hi powered rifle". It was a military style semi-auto.
sorry, didn't mean to confuse generic terms it was a mini 14 in .223
Common sense tells me that if the officer would've had a high capacity 9mm with 16 rounds, the perpetrator wouldn't have been able to simply walk over and shoot him, because the officer would've still had ten rounds left.
common sense he would have died ten rounds later.
In a shootout with a heavily armed and deranged individual, sixteen rounds beats six, 24-7-365. It's just plain common sense.

NO only one round matters you can't miss fast enough.

BTW I'm dedicating this thread to you Defensory as you are one of the biggest flamers on THR.

Scoutsout2645
August 1, 2008, 07:02 PM
"I find revolvers easier to draw, easier to get a first hit with, easier to point shoot"

The whole revolver vs. semi-auto thing is ridiculous. The "right" gun is one that fits your body, shoots instinctively and allows you to accurately place follow-up shots if necessary. Then you need to PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

If you're a civilian CCW, practice drawing from under your zippered winter jacket while carrying a bag of groceries in your left hand. You HD shooters with kids, practice working your triggerlock or safe. Now do it with your eyes closed. Shoot at targets in the dark using a flashlight in your offhand. Both shooters: sprint 100 ft, do 15 pushups (to simulate the adrenaline rush of an armed confrontation) then do these tasks. I would much rather face a fat wheezing videogame hero with a .44 automag that he can't shoot at 5 yards than the disciplined, fit shooter that can empty his .22 revolver, under stress, into the 10 ring at 15 yards in 4 seconds. And to support an earlier post commenting on fitness--if you can't find your holster under your belly or if your arms are skinnier than your barrel it doesn't matter WHAT you carry (we've all seen one at the range...don't be that guy)

Ultimately, pick the strongest gun that you can shoot accurately and quickly, and that fits your hand and shooting needs. What works for me won't necessarially work for you and vice versa. After shooting Berettas, Sigs and S&Ws (all of which are "the best" to someone else) I love my Glock 23 as a great CQB/combat pistol without reservation. Other people may hate it as too big/small/thick/skinny/choose your adjective. Find YOUR gun, get proficient with it, and don't spit on another gun just because it's not YOURS.

On a side note, I see a lot of anti-(either) posts using LEO scenarios. LEOs have different missions/responsibilities than a civilian in a self-DEFENSE situation. Unless you do high-risk things like routinely doing large cash bank drops, you are most likely never going to face multiple attackers who will press an attack instead of flee when confronted with deadly force. Remember the mantra of self-defense: Train; react aggressively; do the most damage in the least time; get the hell outta Dodge. A wheel gun will accomplish this task just as well as a semi-auto.

crebralfix
August 1, 2008, 08:49 PM
Second the notion of differences in Law Enforcement! I'm sure many cops are comforted by the fact that their weapons were picked by a committee of "concerned" politicians who know next to nothing about guns but certainly understand budgets and liability. Just think! The gun they get cost less than the one that they didn't get!

DougDubya
August 1, 2008, 09:29 PM
I love Mavracer, but I especially cherish those who won't flame someone for carrying a revolver.

Mall ninjas, go home and continue duct taping armor plates to your back.

chrisf8657
August 1, 2008, 11:47 PM
People buy what they see being "sold" in gun mags. They buy what they see the Police carry. They buy what the "guy" at the gun store said too.


I can attest to this fact - first gun I bought was a Glock 22, because that's what the Police carry. Fast forward, my Model 60's and SP-101 are what I carry. I have always prefered a revolver to a auto, even though I own several auto's.

Defensory
August 2, 2008, 06:10 AM
Posted by Mavracer:
sorry, didn't mean to confuse generic terms it was a mini 14 in .223

The Mini-14 is a military style semi-auto, NOT a "high powered rifle". As usual, I was right and you were wrong.

common sense he would have died ten rounds later.

Sheer conjecture on your part. 16 rounds would've given him a MUCH higher chance of scoring a hit. Plus the perpetrator was a retired librarian who wasn't a very good shot.

NO only one round matters you can't miss fast enough.

^Hogwash. Both LEO's and the military carry significant amounts of extra ammunition with them. Many cops these days carry a loaded semi-auto with two extra full magazines, plus a "New York Reload". Even cops who carry a revolver usually have two extra speedloaders. Because they know MORE is BETTER in a gun fight! Plain common sense.

BTW I'm dedicating this thread to you Defensory as you are one of the biggest flamers on THR.

Mavracer the Pot calling the Kettle black! As is virtually always the case, YOU drew "first blood" in this thread, by attacking me. Your hypocrisy REEKS! :D

Defensory
August 2, 2008, 06:26 AM
Memory of a Fallen Officer

Published: May 31, 1992

"For police officers on the street, the strongest argument for letting them have semiautomatic weapons is the memory of a fellow officer who died while trying to reload his gun.

Officer Scott Gadell, armed with the standard six-shot revolver, was killed during a 1986 shootout in Queens by a man carrying a 9-millimeter gun that held more than a dozen bullets.

"Every cop knows about Scott," said Officer Robert James Evers of the 71st Precinct in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. "He's an example of a cop who did everything he was supposed to but ended up dying because of second rate equipment."

Leaping for Cover

On a humid June day Officer Gaddell, 22 years old, and his partner chased a gunman in Far Rockaway, Queens. As Officer Gadell reached an alley behind a rooming house, the gunman, crouching in a recessed basement entry, opened fire. Officer Gadell, leaping for the cover of a stoop, returned it.

The gunman fired a total of nine shots from his 9-millimeter semi-automatic gun.

Officer Gadell fired all six bullets in his .38-caliber revolver and was reloading -- and momentarily vulnerable -- when he was struck by gunfire. The officer, who was wearing a bulletproof vest, was shot on the left side of the forehead, just above the ear.

The assailant, 35-year-old Robert Roulston, who was described as a low-level drug dealer, was eventually captured, found guilty of second-degree murder and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison.

"If he had the 9-millimeter he wouldn't have had to reload," Officer Evers said. "And maybe he'd still be alive.""

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CE4D7103BF932A05756C0A964958260

pinkymingeo
August 2, 2008, 07:22 AM
Based on what I read, the bad guys win more gunfights than they lose. An FBI analysis I read a while back suggested that the BG's often get more practice and are more proficient with their weapons than the cops. The reports I've heard of gunfights involving LEO's indicate that their hit ratio is miserable. Hit what you shoot at instead of spraying and praying, and you have a decent chance of surviving a shootout.

mavracer
August 2, 2008, 09:25 AM
Mavracer the Pot calling the Kettle black! As is virtually always the case, YOU drew "first blood" in this thread, by attacking me. Your hypocrisy REEKS!
You are on a thread about people who flame people for carrying revolvers flaming people for carrying revolvers.
Wake up man we're talking about you.

BTW.
A. .223/5.56 is a legal round for NRA high power.

B.I read the facts from the case (not from some counter strike forum.
quoted from Florida SC
The defendant shot at Officer
Johnson, wounding him in the leg (R 2 1 2 4 ) . He then stalked
Officer Johnson into the parking lot, and upon finding him, fired several
more shots into the policeman's body, killing him

Pat Cannon
August 2, 2008, 10:23 AM
Based on what I read, the bad guys win more gunfights than they lose. An FBI analysis I read a while back suggested that the BG's often get more practice and are more proficient with their weapons than the cops. The reports I've heard of gunfights involving LEO's indicate that their hit ratio is miserable. Hit what you shoot at instead of spraying and praying, and you have a decent chance of surviving a shootout.The disadvantage of have less practice than your opponent can be a big one, true.

The disadvantage of not being the one that starts the gunfight is huge.

Poor East Texan
August 2, 2008, 02:39 PM
Accuracy trumps caliber. Whether Revo or Bottom Feeder.

We are not Police. We aren't Supposed to get into the stuff they do. Ideally we live in condition yellow and stay out of gunfights.

That said, hit center mass or poke 'em in the eye. That'll slow 'em down.

RX-178
August 2, 2008, 03:02 PM
My first time carrying concealed was with a revolver. With the exception of my NAA mini, I haven't carried one since. I always try to have an auto pistol on me when I go out.

And I think the revolver haters are NUTS.

The only reason I carry autos is because I can draw and shoot condition-1 faster and more accurately than with a double action. If I shot that well with a revolver, I sure as hell would carry one.

My weapon holds 12+1 rounds, and I carry a spare magazine, not because I have any misconceptions about needing a ton of ammo, but because I carry one mag of low-pressure ammunition, and one mag of full power ammunition. It's a paranoid habit that came from early fears of hearing damage ever since I started shooting. To this day I still find myself referring to these loads as 'indoor' and 'outdoor' ammo.


Bottom line is, nobody is realistically going to NEED 12+1 rounds in a self defense situation while carrying. Your best weapon is something you can shoot accurately, and shoot first. For me, that weapon just HAPPENS to hold 12+1 rounds of .45ACP. For other people, that weapon happens to hold 5 rounds of .38Spl.

jad0110
August 2, 2008, 03:13 PM
The only reason I carry autos is because I can draw and shoot condition-1 faster and more accurately than with a double action. If I shot that well with a revolver, I sure as hell would carry one.

Good post RX, I can certainly respect your position. I do best with 1911s and wheelies, so that's what I gravitate towards. Buy the hardware that integrates best with your software! :cool:

420Stainless
August 2, 2008, 04:07 PM
No. But I've been flamed for stating that five rounds provide enough security for me.

I carry semi most of the time simply because I prefer them for that use. But I don't feel more vulnerable or less comforted in the times I do chose to carry a revolver.

fastbolt
August 2, 2008, 04:13 PM
ever get flamed for carrying a revolver?

Why in the world would I ever care what someone else thought about my choice of firearms? :scrutiny:

I extend the same respect to others. I don't commonly question the choices, or make uninvited comments regarding the choices, made by our folks when it comes to off-duty weapons or folks coming through CCW classes.

I grew up shooting revolvers and pistols. The revolvers were mostly single action until I reached my late teens.

My first issued service weapons were revolvers, a M66 4" and then a M686 4". I carried a number of different revolvers as off-duty weapons during the early part of my career.

As a LE firearms instructor I've often wished that the newer & younger LE folks I help train had received the benefits to be gained from learning to properly use a traditional double action revolver. Mastering a DA revolver can often make for some very good foundation skills when it comes to using a handgun.

My commonly chosen off-duty weapon of recent years has once again become a revolver, one or another J-frame, and I suspect it will continue to be so when I retire.

I balance the considerations of ergonomics, capacity, balance, handling & manipulation, controllability, practical accuracy, and ease of lawful concealment (carry method and overall weight) against the anticipated circumstances involved in my everyday activities ... and choose the weapon design/platform accordingly.

Choosing from among the different designs & platforms requires careful consideration of the inherent advantages & disadvantages of each, in the situations & circumstances anticipated, as well as the familiarity, knowledge, skills and abilities of the individual making the choice.

Naturally, my risk assessment & decision-making process is influenced by the experiences, knowledge and training received during my career in LE, and it may differ from a lot of other folks, even other LE. Not surprising.

Not something which keeps me awake at night, either. ;)

jaholder1971
August 2, 2008, 06:05 PM
Memory of a Fallen Officer

Published: May 31, 1992

"For police officers on the street, the strongest argument for letting them have semiautomatic weapons is the memory of a fellow officer who died while trying to reload his gun.

Officer Scott Gadell, armed with the standard six-shot revolver, was killed during a 1986 shootout in Queens by a man carrying a 9-millimeter gun that held more than a dozen bullets.

"Every cop knows about Scott," said Officer Robert James Evers of the 71st Precinct in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. "He's an example of a cop who did everything he was supposed to but ended up dying because of second rate equipment."

Leaping for Cover

On a humid June day Officer Gaddell, 22 years old, and his partner chased a gunman in Far Rockaway, Queens. As Officer Gadell reached an alley behind a rooming house, the gunman, crouching in a recessed basement entry, opened fire. Officer Gadell, leaping for the cover of a stoop, returned it.

The gunman fired a total of nine shots from his 9-millimeter semi-automatic gun.

Officer Gadell fired all six bullets in his .38-caliber revolver and was reloading -- and momentarily vulnerable -- when he was struck by gunfire. The officer, who was wearing a bulletproof vest, was shot on the left side of the forehead, just above the ear.

The assailant, 35-year-old Robert Roulston, who was described as a low-level drug dealer, was eventually captured, found guilty of second-degree murder and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison.

"If he had the 9-millimeter he wouldn't have had to reload," Officer Evers said. "And maybe he'd still be alive.""


Of those 6 shots that he fired, how many hit the perp before he had to reload?

Just because you can shoot 9 more rounds than a revolver doesn't mean you won't miss another 9 times.

Topeka PD went from Model 66 .357 Magnums to 5906 9mm pistols around 1991. Despite going to a lower recoiling weapon the scores on the range dropped and 1-2 shots fired per street shooting went to 4-6.

Lesson learned: Go with what you can hit with. Wheel gun, semi auto, whiffle ball bat.

papajohn
August 2, 2008, 07:12 PM
My PD training time included the changeover from revolvers to semi's, and I begged the chief to double the practice ammo budget, to no avail. So I asked for more range time for our officers, and he said no. Our revolver qualification scores averaged 92% with the Smith 681's we were issued. When we were done training with our new Beretta 92's, the average was 74%. I asked if those who wanted to could revert back to carrying revolvers, and he said no. To hell with officer safety.........:mad:

I shoot both types and own several of each, but in general revolvers are easier to teach and learn, easier to manipulate, and easier to fit to an individual's hand. Anyone who sneers at someone for carrying a sixgun probably ought not mock his ability to hit with it!

Papajohn

EMC45
August 2, 2008, 07:42 PM
I have both revolvers and autos. I shoot both quite well. I would stake my life on my shooting abilities! Now the folks who bash revolvers are often the young and the inexperienced. Don't get me wrong, I am kind of young (31), but I know the merit of a Wheelgun! I would much rather tote a S&W J frame than a Glock hicap any day! I have seen the young guys at the public ranges with their hicap pistols spray the target and get a "pattern" and not a group and I have seen them snicker as I pull out a couple Wheelguns. They don't snicker after I'm done shooting though!

bleachcola
August 2, 2008, 07:44 PM
But then I show up at the range and group a tight pattern with my hi-cap autoloader and both sides bow down before my awesomeness.

bleachcola
August 2, 2008, 07:46 PM
For the record I'm not bashing revolvers though. I own both and love both but for personal defense against humans I'll take a reliable hi-cap autoloader over any of my wheelies any day.

PuntoQuatroCinco
August 2, 2008, 07:59 PM
By far my favorite thing about my snubby 642 is that in the winter I carry it in a pocket holster in my jacket. It will fire from inside there, I can have my hand on it ready to go without freaking people out and it wont jam when it ends up getting screwed into a potential attackers soft parts. These are strengths that are often overlooked. Several times I have been approached by crack heads in Wal Mart parking lot and have been able to discretely cover them at their 3 or 4 foot distance without them having a clue, while politely telling them to to :cuss: off...
This being said: When Im wearing a jacket Im also wearing my Sig 220.
In short: When able carry both...

docmagnum357
August 25, 2008, 10:44 PM
Gosh,
I said I didn't want to start another one of those Ford versus Chevy, 9mm versus 45 things. There has been a lot of wisdom here, both first hand a second third hand. Personally, I don't trust anecdotal evidence, even if it is personal, because anecdotal is close to anomolie (wher's the spell check button). I am going to keep on carrying my 629, because it works. Not every time, not in every circumstance, but it works. I tend to be real cool while things are going down, and shaky afterwards, as evidenced by car crashes/ near crashes, and fist fights. It's not that I'm fearless, I just don't get rattled until later....Some people just have a slower adreneline rush, or else they handle it better.
I have aquired a second model 29, with a four inch barrel. While doing church security work, I sometimes have high profile people in a low risk situation to worry about, and that makes me nervous enough to carry both, one in a shoulder holster, one on the belt. Any fights I am likely to get into in this situation are likely to be the kind wher i must stand my ground, and couldn't possibly get to cover or concealment if I wanted to.
Church security, in a greast big open sanctuary, predetermines two things; Your shots may be long, because other team members may not be able to shoot because of innocents running around, and you absolutely MUST put the bad gut down NOW. This being said, I understand that the Secret service is rumored to have bought a bunch of FN 5.7s. Go figure.

In my private life, I work outside all the time, and I have more to worry about from rabid animals and stray dogs/ black bears than i do from two legged varmints. Same scenario, where would i run to, and how could I get there fast enough anyway? The worst thing I have to fear from people is when i am on the farm, and there the likely scenario is a rifle toting poacher or dope grower. Again, no place to hide even if i wanted to. Shoot and scoot is good if you can do it. Just plain scoot is the best. But I can't see my self ever having that luxury. Same for the bad guy. where would he run to? He would have to stand and deliver, too. That could get ugly if I shot him with a "service "calibre, even a 45. A carbine would be better, but how would I work with a carbine IN MY HAND? Same with church security. I have a friend, who has a friend, who is a south African national. Once upon a time, His job was to guard the offering in church , with a pump shotgun. Things are a little different in the U.S., and thank God they are.

When my wife and i go to town, I have the luxury of being able to get behind a car or other cover if we were ever assaulted in a parking lot, etc., but My wife has type two diabetes, and she can't run, period. Walking fast in a low light situation is iffy for her. While I love her dearly, and would gladly lay down my life for her, I had rather punch three or four inch and one half holes in a bad guy and trust accuracy, speed and power in all these situations.

Add to this the fact that i am a big dude, and can carry two "n" frames concealed under a sport coat, and you see why, maybe, I have made the choices that I have. I may switch to carrying A GLOCK 23 for a BUG, with an extra magazine, but for me, primary will always be a 629 or a 29.

scrat
August 25, 2008, 10:53 PM
The only thing i get is "Where the heck did you get that cannon and what do you plan on doing with that":what::what::what:

http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q77/scratm3/jklhjkj1.jpghttp://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q77/scratm3/4Apr-31.jpg
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q77/scratm3/IMG_1899-1.jpg
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q77/scratm3/IMG_1895.jpg
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q77/scratm3/DSC03609.jpg

Drgong
August 25, 2008, 11:14 PM
Nice gun Scrat... what is it?

Poor East Texan
August 25, 2008, 11:33 PM
That IS an interesting beast!

And Nagant means "Tough as Nails" in Finnish.

scrat
August 25, 2008, 11:49 PM
The smaller ones are 1851 Navy .44. Then one is a 1860 Army again .44 then the biggie is Walker. Biggest baddest and the second revolver ever made in history.

Fact 1847 Colt Walker
Shoots .44 size .454 Round ball 60 grains of black powder Biggest load ever made for a revolver in its time.

Pull the side wedge take out the cylinder. Put in an r&d cylinder and it shoots 45 Colt.
presto 2 guns in one.

The gun is 16 inches long and weighs in at 4 1/2 lbs. Just as big as a 500 S&W. When shooting full loads of Black powder its just as loud as a 500. But with a big puff of smoke.

The smaller guns all have 7 1/4 inch barrels. the Walker has a 9 inch

Man that gun is heavy though. So no i dont have any problems when i go to the range. i usually get a lot of open space once i start shooting. usually a good 5 feet on each side. Go figure.

DrDeFab
August 26, 2008, 01:07 AM
Let me start by saying I certainly won't flame anybody for their carry preference, and I fullly agree with "carry what you're comfortable with."

But I'm going to have to take issue with this:

Statistically, there a less than three shots exchanged in a gunfight. I dare not bring that up over there, but it is a fact.

Nope, not a fact. As far as I can tell, it was one study (NYPD SOP-9) that came up with that number, on data from 1970-1981, and the method of computing it has some methodology problems.

Here are links to some articles with more recent info:

http://www.theppsc.org/Grossman/Farnam/NYPD.htm
http://www.theppsc.org/Grossman/SOP9/2000.htm
http://www.theppsc.org/Grossman/Main-R.htm

Where I work, we take statistics pretty seriously. The data in those articles isn't sufficient to make any real conclusions. Too few observations and too homogenous a sample space, for one thing. Some key variables are missing, too - like outcome. (As far as I have seen, that is. I don't have access to the raw data.)

Some things I would love to know, but probably never will:

In what percent of incidents did an officer fire more than 6 shots?
Is there a correlation between # of shots and a positive outcome? If so, in which direction?
What was the malfunction rate during the incidents for officers carrying semi-autos?
Are these numbers reflective of other regions? non-LEO incidents?
Is there a significant difference in outcome in cases where the officer reloaded/switched to BUG?

...and so forth.

So I'm stuck with my gut feel. :uhoh:

For me, in an urban/suburban environment, it says the odds of needing more than 6 shots, while low, feels substantially higher than that of having my carry pistol malfunction.

YMMV. In fact, I would be surprised if it didn't for many of you. ;)

scrat
August 26, 2008, 01:20 AM
Carl Levitian
Senior Member



Join Date: 06-03-08
Location: Maryland
Posts: 150 Why a revolver.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Most people who know me, also know I have a very strong bias toward the revolver. At the present time, the only auto pistol I have is an old Ruger standard model I bought new for 39'95. That tells you haow long ago it was bought new by me.

I wasn't always this way. At one time I was a fan of the 1911, and owned a nice Colt series 70, with the Colt manufactured .22 conversion unit for it with the floating chamber. I sold it off in 1977.

The year 1977 was a pivotal year for my gun preffernces. I had just joined the Trinidad Colorado police department, under Chief Denis Demsey. In Colorado back then, a police officer could use any gun of his choice, as long as it held at least 6 shots, was of at least .38 caliber, and had at least a 4 inch barrel. Since I had served in the U.S. Army, the 1911A1 and I were old friends. When I went off to the C.L.E.T.A. (Colorado Law Enforcement Training Acadamy) I took my .45 with me. I was planning on qualitfying with it as my service weapon.

Plans change.

In the thrird week of the acadamy, the range instructor was a Sgt. Tom Crowe, and our head training officer was Sgt. Ralph Smith, with a Captian Stewart as commanding officer. Sgt. Crowe remarked that he saw some of us had plans on using an auto pistol for our service weapon. Okay, he said, but first he wanted us to listen from somebody. Sgt Crowe was a die hard revolver man, Smith and Wesson being his God. He must have been good, as he was a champian PPC competitor.

This morning in question, he went over and opened the side door to the classroom we were in, and a young guy in his 20's wheeled himself in. He was in a wheelchair. He addressed the class.

He had been a Pueblo police officer, and had been carrying a Smith and Wesson model 39. One day he had stopped a car for blowing a stop sign, and unknown ot him, the guy had just robbed a gas and go. It had not gone out on the air yet. They guy jumps out with an old M1 carbine, and opens fire on the officer. The officer returns fire, or tries to, but this model 39 jams on the first shot, with a smokestack. While the officer is trying to do the tap rack bang drill, the guy with the carbine runs up to him and shoots him three times. Two of the bullets do little damage while going through the second chance vest he has on, but one of them severs his spine at the waist.

He sat there telling us of the incident, and how he would never walk again, go anyplace without that wheel chair, never make love with his wife again, never get to play ball with his young sone again. It was a very thought provocking afternoon. He told us if he had the chance to do it over again, he'd be carrying a revolver.

They let us go early that day, and I went out and sat in my jeep for a while. I did some thinking, and I knew what I was going to do. I traded in my old .45 auto and .22 conversion kit on a new Smith and Wesson model 64, and the gunshop tossed in a set of pachmier grips and some HKS speed loeaders. I shot that 64 for many years, and I still have it. Over the last 31 years I've not had a single malfunction from it, or the model 60 with the bobbed hammer that was my duty back up and off duty gun. I loved my 1911, but like most auto's, it would bobble once in a great while. I deceided not to gamble, and went with a gun that would not let me down. To this day, niether revolver has yet to malfunction, no matter what type of bullet or load goes through it.

I remember Sgt. Smith telling us that the averige gunfight is a couple yards, a couple shots, in a couple seconds. Close, fast, and its all over one way or the other.

I love my revolvers.

We can go round and round on revolver versus autoloader

GlowinPontiac
September 16, 2008, 11:53 PM
I love my revolvers. When I carry a wheelgun it's either a snubnose .357 or a snubnose .38 (both S&W's).

Several friends have suggested that I carry my semiauto instead of the revolver but i just enjoy the wheelguns more!

mtngunr
September 17, 2008, 12:51 AM
in answer to the original question, not after someone watches me shoot my revolvers.

BikerRN
September 17, 2008, 05:01 AM
On Duty it's "Autoloader Only".

Off Duty I can carry what I want, and do. Normally I carry three Revolvers, a 3" GP100 and a 2 1/4" SP101 with a J-Frame to back up the first two. That takes care of the capacity issue of Revolver vs Autoloader for me. I also carry a couple of reloads.

Up close it doesn't matter to me if I'm shooting an Autoloader or a Revolver, but when the distance starts getting longer I'm better with the wheelgun. There is something to be said for accuracy. Two of three times I have seen my Front Sight in real life situations. The one time I didn't see my front Sight was when I was busy deflecting a blade.

Revolvers work, period. Autoloaders are "pretty" reliable, but do I want to stake my life on "pretty"? If I were to carry Autoloaders on my own time I would still be carrying three guns, as I like having a gun accessable no matter what hand I have available to draw with or position I may find myself in.

The Revolver handles a wider range of ammo and power levels than an Autoloader, is easier in terms of "Administrative Handling", and forces one to concentrate on the fundamentals of shooting. All those are positives in my book.

I may switch it up next year and carry a pair of Glocks, either a 19/26 combo or a 32/33 combo, but I also have a J-Frame as well. The reason I may switch is for training/teaching purposes, not because I don't think the Revolver is up to the task. As far as the original question, no, I don't catch too much flack for carrying a Revolver as I tend to hit what I aim at.

Some of my younger co-workers kid me about the "old man" guns, but when we compare groups they usually quiet down.

BikerRN

ferretray
September 17, 2008, 10:40 AM
To answer the OP:
I can't recall getting any grief for choosing a revolver. Awhile back I was at my FIL's place shooting a 1911 and he said something about six shots of .357 being "Enough". I agreed with him. My very first firearms purchase was a S&W 66, many moons ago.
Time spent in the USMC/USN introduced me to the 1911. I have a serious case of "Coltitis". They can be a money pit, and I ain't rich.
I tote a .44 Mag. Mountain Gun now and will soon have a .38 snubbie in an off-side pocket. I suppose a .357 would do for a primary, but I really like the versatility of the .44. I'm hoping to add some feral pork to some freezers with the hand cannon.
I've probably had one of just about everything over these many years. For personal self defense, the revolver will do. As far as the arguments ref. capacity, many a southwest Lawdog survived border fighting with a sixgun. Jim Cirillo took out three for three with a .38 in one of his gunfights. I seem to remember something about a good guy doing something similar in a Wells Fargo office around the turn of the century. I'd say alot of it has to do with the person behind the trigger.

Drgong
September 17, 2008, 10:46 AM
Thanks Poor East Texan, think I will have to borrow that :)

As for revolvers, I am a LOT more accurate with a revolver then a Semi-auto. I trust Jframes a lot more then the small semi-autos of that size.

MCgunner
September 17, 2008, 10:54 AM
I get flamed, but for my affection for my Taurus revolvers from the S&W koolaid drinkers. :rolleyes:

Drgong
September 17, 2008, 11:17 AM
MC, why would you buy a crappy Taurus ;)

Kidding of course, even if I am a S&W fan. ;)

MCgunner
September 17, 2008, 11:26 AM
Ahhh, it just gets old. :D A significant portion of my nearly 10K post count is defending Taurus. Hell, if it weren't for that, I might not have broke a hundred, yet. :rolleyes:

BTW, a Nagant is a "chick magnet"? Who knew? LOL

PRM
September 19, 2008, 06:31 PM
Flamed for carrying a revolver - There is an old saying if you can't stand the heat get out of the kitchen. In 1990 I qualified for a Distinguished Expert Badge. To get this, I had to shoot a perfect score on 5 consecutive approved courses. When I participated in this event, My revolver of choice was an original # 3 Smith & Wesson, chambered in 44 Russian. The old break top was in NRA excellent condition and I was shooting custom loaded BP cartridges with the original factory specs. Model 29 speed loaders fit the old work horse perfectly. Flamed for carrying a revolver - sometimes you just have to consider the source.

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