S&W 629 Issues


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Flynt
July 29, 2008, 09:23 AM
I just bought a beautiful, new-to-me, S&W Model 629 classic (6.5" barrel). I don't know anything about revolvers, but it was apparent that, while the gun was dirty, it seemed to have been fired very little. Almost pristine.

Last night I removed the grips and noticed a little rust on the frame, just where it contacts the outer edge of the grips. Also some very faint indications of rust on the big leaf spring. I easily brushed off the rust, and polished down the pitting on the frame. Now I'm wondering if there's rust in the guts of the gun.

How can I disassemble the gun and check? I noticed several screws on the side plate, but I'm hesitant to just barge in there and possibly have a bunch of springs jumping out. What do you guys recommend? Thanks.

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macadore
July 29, 2008, 11:34 AM
The S&W Model 629 classic with the 6.6 barrel is the only revolver I own. I bought it new back in the Stone Age. It is a great handgun. I do not believe anything will jump out at you if you take off the side plate. Just be sure to note where everything is before you take things out. You might want to take a picture or find one on the internet. If you have reasonable mechanical skills there should be no problem. The only problem I have had is the ejector rod backing out. You can put Loctite on the threads or periodically tighten it by hand. IIRC, it is a left handed thread, but it has been a long times since I had that problem.

harmonic
July 29, 2008, 11:56 AM
Remove the sideplate screws carefully. You want to use a hollow ground screwdriver so as not to deface the screw heads. Buggered screw heads are probably the most common cosmetic imperfection with Smith revolvers.

Also, remember the order in which you removed the screws. The sideplate screw farthest to the front is especially ground (extended tip) to hold the yoke/crane in place, so it differs from the other two. (At least with the Smith revolvers I've fooled with; YMMV?)

Once the screws are removed, open the cylinder and carefully slide the yoke/crane/cylinder forward, thus removing it/them.

Then, with grips removed, sideplate screws removed, cylinder/yoke removed, use a wooden hammer handle and "rap" the bottom of the grip frame. It's all steel, so you're not going to hurt anything. "Rap" it until the sideplate dislodges and then pull the sideplate off.

That will give you a look at the innards.

Edited to add: you want to hit the bottom of the grip frame on the same side as is the sideplate. I.e., you're smacking the frame downward, so that inertia will pull the sideplate "upward."

You say you "polished" down the pitting on the frame? I hope you didn't use ordinary steel wool, as the particles from ordinary steel wool lodge in the stainless steel and will themselves cause rusting. You either use stainless steel steel wool or something like Flitz.

Good luck. If you decide to completely disassemble your gun, be advised that some of those springs are under pressure and are hard to find once they become airborne.

Steve C
July 29, 2008, 12:07 PM
Then, with grips removed, sideplate screws removed, cylinder/yoke removed, use a wooden hammer handle and "rap" the bottom of the grip frame. It's all steel, so you're not going to hurt anything. "Rap" it until the sideplate dislodges and then pull the sideplate off.

Make sure you remove the side plate as Harmonic describes.

DO NOT pry it up with the screw driver as you'll ding up the plate and mess up the perfect plate to frame fit.

Flynt
July 29, 2008, 01:22 PM
Thanks, guys. (I used Osso to polish out most of the pitting.)

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